Posted in ASU EA, Dual Enrollment, HS4CC, Transfer Credit

Insider Tip: Choosing Your First ASU Course

We are often asked which course to start with from Arizona State University’s Earned Admissions (EA) lineup. This isn’t a “one size fits all” answer, but there are a few things to keep in mind as you consider your options.

  1. Choose something that interests your student. Personal interest is a great motivator, especially if this is their first class.
  2. Choose a general education course (English, Math, Humanities, Social Science, Science). General education courses have the highest likelihood of transfer toward a degree plan later.
  3. Choose easier classes to build confidence. College classes are going to require work, make no mistake, but some ASU classes are considered “easier” by our HS4CC parents, and an early win goes a long way for motivation later.
  4. Choose a course not available through local dual enrollment. ASU’s EA catalog offers a lot of special and interesting courses you may not have access to locally. If you have free dual enrollment locally, use ASU courses to supplement your plan.
  5. Check the “high school graduation” box. If your state has high school graduation requirements, each ASU course = 1 high school credit. You can accumulate a lot of high school (and college) credit this way in half the time.

3 Strong Candidates to Consider

ENGLISH

If this is the student’s first attempt at a dual credit course, some suggest choosing a course that interests the student. Students who enjoy writing may enjoy ENG 101 English Composition, which has self-paced or teacher-led options. This course is likely a great transfer candidate for most colleges and it may replace the need for placement exams. English 101 is worth a full high school language arts credit and 3 college credits.

MATH

Students who are finishing Algebra 2 and enjoy math may wish to start with MAT 117 College Algebra, which also has self-paced or teacher-led options. Like English Composition, this course may also fulfill the placement test requirement for entry to other colleges. College Algebra is also a common general education requirement for many degree plans. Like many colleges, ASU utilizes Aleks math as their math platform. ASU also added extra video tutorials and a Discussion Forum to answer questions. College Algebra is worth a full high school math credit and 3 college credits.

ELECTIVE

EXW 100 Introduction to Health and Wellness has had great reviews from our members and is frequently recommended by those who have taken it as a great first course and confidence builder. Health is a teacher-led course. This course could be classified as a health course or elective worth one high school credit and 3 college credits.

” Super common sense. I don’t want to say “easy”. The student still has to study. But, it will help the student get used to the weekly pace of discussion questions, quiz, case study, interactive and Cerego (their review tool), without overwhelming them. My son has all of his work done by Wednesday evening, the material is so clear. He’s getting 98% in the class. I wish it had been his first class.”
– member CL 11/2020

As with all of ASU’s EA courses, students pay $25 to take the course, and $400 at the end if they like the grade. If students do not pay the $400 at the end, there is no record of failure. Students may retake courses as many times as is needed, until they get the grade they want. For more information:

Overview of ASU’s Earned Admissions Program

How to Sign Up for ASU’s Earned Admissions Courses

ASU Course Reviews Page

One more thing!

If you enroll in one of ASU’s EA courses, be sure to join our ASU Homeschooling for College Credit Facebook group! You’ll learn how to get the most out of the program with us!

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