Fall HS Online Course: Forensic and Investigative Science

Aspiring forensic scientist at home? Here’s a great option that is open enrollment for any teen. No high school transcript required, no placement testing, and no calendar. All fully self-paced courses you can plug into your teen’s fall schedule. These courses are approved by the International Association for Identification (IAI) and International Association of Bloodstain Pattern Analysts (IABPA) and accredited by the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement (TCOLE) and are open to teens in all 50 states.

The Texas Forensic Science Academy is offering self-paced online courses for high school students that lead to a recognized credential in preparation for their career in forensics.

The Forensic and Investigative Sciences program is designed for high school students and will give graduates a recognized credential that can translate into greater recognition in a future career in forensics. After completing the required courses offered through the Texas Forensic Science Academy graduates will have an intermediate understanding of forensics topics.

The Forensic and Investigative Sciences Level I is designed for high school students and will give graduates a recognized credential that can translate into greater recognition in a future career in forensics. Recommendation: 1/2 high school credit

The Forensic and Investigative Sciences Level II After completing the required courses offered through the Texas Forensic Science Academy graduates will have an intermediate understanding of forensics topics. Recommendation: 1 high school credit


BONUS: Career in Forensics

If you’re considering signing your teen up for the courses above, it’s a good idea to include a little “career exploration” in the process. You can do this informally or work it into their homeschool, but this research will help your teen decide if this is a career they’re interested in pursuing.

The best resource for any occupational information is The Department of Labor Occupational Outlook Handbook. It’s online and free to access, and it gives you the real nuts and bolts about any career. It’s my “go-to” trusted resource for learning what a career is really about, what it really pays, and what type of education you really need to get into the field.

US Department of Labor Forensic Science Technician Entry

Quick Facts: Forensic Science Technicians
2020 Median Pay$60,590 per year
$29.13 per hour
Typical Entry-Level EducationBachelor’s degree
Work Experience in a Related OccupationNone
On-the-job TrainingModerate-term on-the-job training
Number of Jobs, 201917,200
Job Outlook, 2019-2914% (Much faster than average)
Employment Change, 2019-292,400

How to Become a Forensic Science Technician

Forensic science technicians

Forensic science technicians usually have a background in natural sciences.

Forensic science technicians typically need at least a bachelor’s degree in a natural science, such as chemistry or biology, or in forensic science. On-the-job training is usually required both for those who investigate crime scenes and for those who work in labs.

Education

Forensic science technicians typically need at least a bachelor’s degree in a natural science, such as chemistry or biology, or in forensic science. Forensic science programs may specialize in a specific area of study, such as toxicology, pathology, or DNA. Students who enroll in general natural science programs should make an effort to take classes related to forensic science. A list of schools that offer degrees in forensic science is available from the American Academy of Forensic Sciences. Many of those who seek to become forensic science technicians will have an undergraduate degree in the natural sciences and a master’s degree in forensic science.

Many crime scene investigators who work for police departments are sworn police officers and have met educational requirements necessary for admittance into a police academy. Applicants for civilian crime scene investigator jobs should have a bachelor’s degree in either forensic science, with a strong basic science background, or the natural sciences. For more information on police officers, see the profile on police and detectives.

Important Qualities

Communication skills. Forensic science technicians write reports and testify in court. They often work with other law enforcement officials and specialists.

Critical-thinking skills. Forensic science technicians use their best judgment when matching physical evidence, such as fingerprints and DNA, to suspects.

Detail oriented. Forensic science technicians must be able to notice small changes in mundane objects to be good at collecting and analyzing evidence.

Math and science skills. Forensic science technicians need a solid understanding of statistics and natural sciences to be able to analyze evidence.

Problem-solving skills. Forensic science technicians use scientific tests and methods to help law enforcement officials solve crimes.


Author:

Executive Director of Homeschooling for College Credit

4 thoughts on “Fall HS Online Course: Forensic and Investigative Science

  1. I can’t figure out what is entailed in Level I and II. What are all the courses in the yellow box? How many weeks is each Level?

    1. Hi Headplanter, the courses in the yellow box are available individually but when you complete the set for each level, you earn that certificate. The number of approximate hours needed to complete a course is given, the number of weeks is personal preference. Hope that helps!

  2. I don’t see on the site how it is self-paced? It looks likely each section has to be completed in 45 days? Just making sure I’m not missing where to sign up for the teen program?

    1. Hello Ann, you’re in the right place to register teens. Self-paced means they can work at their own speed as opposed to a teacher having them do chapter x by Friday or whatever. In these classes, you enroll whenever and then you just have to finish by the deadline (45 days or whatever they say). Keep in mind many of these classes are very very short- like 1 or 2 hours TOTAL so you’d have 45 days to do that. If you’re doing the certificate, the longest classes for LEVEL 1 are 16 hours (again, over that timeframe). To use the 45-day deadline as an example, you could create a “pace” guide for your teen that divides the course into days or weeks. 3 hours per week would be an example, or you could assign 30 minutes per day, etc. The two longer classes (40 hours) allow 90 days. It’s the shorter classes that allow 45. If you have specific questions, I think they’ll be able to help you better than I can, but I hope that helps a bit. 🙂 Thank you, Jennifer

Comments are closed.