ASU Earned Admissions Course Reviews

Arizona State University offers a unique program called Earned Admissions that allows students of all ages anywhere in the world to take college courses. Students sign up with just an ID, no need to send transcripts or take placement tests. Each course costs $25 to start, and you only pay $400 at the end if you like the grade. If you don’t pay, there is no record of the course or grade. It’s an amazing low-risk high-reward method of satisfying many common general education requirements, with a high likelihood of transferability to other colleges.

Following is a list of the courses offered by ASU’s EA program and course reviews primarily by homeschoolers in our community. There is also a short FAQ at the bottom. Want to join the discussion? Join our ASU Facebook Group!

AST 111 Introduction to Solar Systems Astronomy (3cr lecture, 1cr lab)

Ann D. 5/16/20

The labs are long and deal with long, drawn out conversions of units. Pretty simple algebra or even straight forward conversions between things like light years and miles. The rest was interesting and the exams were learnable. I think Cerego was used. This was the first science I’d taken in 30 years and so much better/easier than my last science class. Ymmv. The lab projects are awesome and used household materials you’ll want to share with the younger ones.

No papers; a smart, hardworking math lover who is beyond Alg I will have no problem cranking out the problem sets! This class does need daily attention, and I’ve seen it done in one day a week (blush), but it’s best done in 4-5 days per week.

For almost every one of these open enrollment, non-writing classes from ASU, you can expect cerego homework (flashcards), a weekly quiz, open book, due basically at midnight Monday; a midterm or paper after the 3rd week, due the same time as week 4 quiz, and a final which does not include the info from weeks 1-3.

Ann D. 3/2020:

EA/ASU’s Astronomy class appears on the transcript as a 3 hour class and a separate 1 hour lab class. It’s very cool, too. I’ve had several of my kids take it at full price ($400). Here’s what it looks like on the transcript:

Ann D. 5/22/20:

(Someone was looking for a STEM course for a  non-STEMy student) The astronomy class is the easiest way through a college lab course The formulas for the test are given to you on a sheet that you take into the exam. The homework that is math based is long, but if you take a couple of hours a day you will get done with the week’s work. There is no risk and you can take it again. My daughter took this class knowing she needed 1 lab for her college degree. She is greatly relieved she’s not had to take the usual freshman bio or chem with 1000 other kids. Try astronomy!

Andrea L. 6/2/20: 

My family is enjoying this course. The videos are interesting, Cerego is helpful for retention (flashcard type thing), the homework is easy – just multiple choice questions from the lectures/reading. The labs so far are multi-step word problems – 12+ questions per Lab (there’s 2 labs, the second one is much shorter- 5ish questions so far). If you haven’t had math in a while, you may need to do a little refresher. Following is a document to help prepare a student for the math to start the ASU Astronomy course. There are links to math review videos and practice problems: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1EbJrqWBnrGPaqXa8x1Qe7X-RmmwCJloPd-gtiZLJlt0/edit?usp=sharing

Update 7/26/20: The course proceeded pretty much like the early weeks, though I think the labs got easier as we got used to everything by week 3. The scientific calculators in our home were in high demand and (bonus) everyone learned to appreciate and use them during this course! We also used the Discussion forums extensively! I miss my summer cohort already! If a student posted a problem, often several others in the group would give hints or explanations, and Professor Timmes was highly responsive to questions. He answered a question I posted at 1am once! My family was mixed on the labs – the guys didn’t enjoy the labs (math problems) but enjoyed the content and got really creative with the design project at the end. I loved the content AND the labs. Also, don’t let the math freak you out! The quizzes and tests only have 3-6 lab style math questions on them, and a student can pass with an A or B, even if he bombs the math questions on the final exam, provided the rest of the class grades were relatively high. There is so much other work to balance it out. An A is still entirely achievable for a student with math anxiety! I highly recommend the course and it was a great bonding experience with the family, at the right price!

Kali P. 7/3/20

We have been very pleased with my son’s ASU class so far. My 13 year old is taking Astronomy with a little over a week left and it is a great mix of not too hard and quite challenging coursework (the labs are tricky). The format is fantastic and the extra accountability built in with timers and such makes it so simple for a teen not used to the college world. The only thing I don’t care for much is the professor can’t be contacted privately and the course can not be worked on ahead. We plan on my son taking their Programming course in August.

MAT 210 Brief Calculus: Calculus for Business and Economics

Ann D 4/2020:

Calculus for social science is real calculus. Don’t underestimate it.

Calculus for Engineers 1: (for science/engineering) MAT 265

Susan P. 5/2020:

My son (age 19) had to take this twice in order to pass with a low C, and he had taken Calculus previously in high school. He did very well on the assignments (outside of the final), and he thoroughly enjoyed the class and the Gradarius format. (I don’t know enough about Calculus myself to judge whether or not he could have done better by studying differently. He’s not a great tester.)

Louisa 7/29/20
This was a good class with the workload being about what you would expect for a calculus class.

CHM 114 General Chemistry for Engineers:

Ann D. 4/2020:

Chemistry was very hard, lots more math, and has fantastic simulated labs I really appreciate. 

7/2020: It’s trig heavy. However, my kid took it concurrently with calculus and we may have covered some of those topics in our precal course which were used in chem. Unsure.
9/2020: My college-age son (with excellent math skills and a B in intro chem at a different university) took Chem for Engineers right before he was admitted to ASU Online. We both thought that the midterm would be sufficient to convince most people to *drop* the course. This class was far harder than calculus and I believe went into the weeds of trig. 

I loved the labs- I thought they were so much more understandable than the actual experiment. …There are angles between atoms in molecules you have to learn.

The course is listed on the transcript as a 4cr chemistry course:

KD 9/2020

I have a 15 year old son in ASU Chem for Engineers. It takes MANY hours a week so far for him to complete the requirements, but he’s getting it done!..and staying the week-ahead-of-schedule that he needs to in order to have the last week to study for the final. He knows it [midterm] is closed-book and that it is timed (but unproctored). He’s put in almost 30 hours a week so far….

The first week that was released wasn’t due for two weeks, and they continue to release new content each week that also is due two weeks out, but if you wait until the due dates to turn things in, you’ll wind up trying to complete the last assignment in the midst of studying for the final.

Question from MH 11/2020

I’m considering this for my 17yo. He is finishing up college algebra with ASU next month. Would he need more math before starting this class? He enjoys science and has chemistry in high school this year (I believe it is algebra based).

Answer from SP 11/2020:

My son, who took it last semester, says it should be just fine with college algebra under your belt. 

Answer from AD 11/2020:
My son took this class after having an amazing high school course and making a good grade in intro chem at another university. He found it hard – you had to use trig to calculate the angles of bonds. Since this is chemistry for engineers, and engineers are expected to be **very** strong in math, I believe he should take the precal class first for the best chance of a good grade.

The course description says “MAT 170 is strongly suggested as a prerequisite for success in this course.” That’s precal. https://ea.asu.edu/courses/general-chemistry-for-engineers-chm-114

CIS 105 Computer Applications and Information Technology:

AD 3/2020:

Cis 105 was not well done. The assignments and tests seemed disconnected from the lectures. 

9/2020 Update: I see why my son said CIS was hard. The spreadsheets are a piece of cake, but the lecturer is dreary! The readings make up the bulk of the class and mainly teach what business buzzwords mean. Not hard, but convoluted. Ugh.

….I talked to my DD who took the equivalent at her college. She said it’s about the same there and strongly advised getting through it any way possible. So I doubt there can be any changes. I play a game when the spreadsheets are explained by another person: I look for formatting differences which are different in his area of the world. I posted one I found unfamiliar on the discussion board. It keeps my attention. 🤫 A positive: the instructor for the class, not the one in the videos, had a live you tube to answer questions & discuss topics. Something of an office hour like experience. She’s interesting since we had not seen her before. 

10/1/2020: My son, junior in high school, just finished up this course. He was disappointed it was not quite what he would have expected – his expectations were to learn more about hardware, software, applications, in general. He found it very business-focused, and for him, that was not interesting content. He enjoyed making the spreadsheets, to a point, but I think due to this disappointment with content, did not really apply himself, but just struggled through it. He ended up doing quite poorly on the final, but still squeaked out a ‘B’ in the class, so we will pay for it and more on. When compared with self-study through CLEP vs. taking this course, I think he’s still happy he took it (definitely more expensive than a free clep through modern states voucher though, yikes – BUT, it’s still a ton less expensive than taking it when he has graduated high school). ~Laura Devick 

MAT 117 College Algebra  

Danika 4/2020: 

College Algebra and Precalculus are self-paced, and are just ALEKS math. College Algebra roughly equates to Algebra 1, Algebra 2, a little Geometry, and some Precalc. There’s not an exact match between it and other high-school math courses.

Ann D 3/2020:

Aleks gives a placement test at the beginning of the class. You will only work on what you don’t already know – one of my kids whizzed through College Algebra since she was already in Precal, but did have some extra since her precal did not cover everything in CA.

AL 6/2020:

It’s Aleks math with videos supplemented by ASU staff. Do the placement test and you start from where you know. Be aware 100% of the grade is the proctored final at the end of the course. I believe you have to get the Aleks pie chart to 90% to test (double check that!). Many colleges use Aleks math, but will include other grades like homework, quizzes, etc, so the full grade is not dependent upon the final. Just something to consider. You have up to 1 year to complete the self-paced version, however the current covid deal for $99 ends 10/25/20, so if you finish after that it’s the normal price of $400 if you like the grade and want it on an ASU transcript. 

Louisa 7/29/20
This is actually ALEKS!! The portal takes you right to the ALEKS website, but it is all nicely integrated with Khan Academy videos. It was a complete at your own pace course. Overall it really clicked for my student.

KD 7/2020
I have two in College Algebra and one in Precalculus. We have not had experience with the ALEKS platform before, and they are LOVING it. This is a great opportunity to earn regionally-accredited “real” credit vs. just a CLEP credit. The two students in College Algebra have also done College Algebra via Modern States and Sophia [for CLEP prep, which we abandoned to do ASU instead], and they are picking up far more in ALEKS so far. CLEP prep for College Algebra was difficult for my older three…REA tests were far harder than the test was, and Peterson’s tests were far easier than the test was, so it was hard to practice and gauge readiness. Hoping for a better solution with ASU for these two kids!

KS. 7/28/20

I really hope the $99 fee will be extended as well. These classes and the opportunity is amazing. My kids LOVE them (one has taken College Algebra, another has taken this Eng Comp class and LOVED it and they are all taking Western Civ currently. They are each signed up for various classes beginning Aug 17. They are actually wishing there was a US History class…we can only hope more will be added. For now, LOVING ASU!

PS 9/2020
For what it is worth . . . My 14-year-old daughter completed Saxon through Algebra II in February. She then completed Sophia’s College Algebra, Foundations of Stats, and Intro to Stats, prior to starting ASU’s College Algebra course via ALEKs. The ALEKs pre-assessment placed her at only 57% of the course mastered, I believe. Meaning that she lacked 43% of the knowledge gained during College Algebra. This addition knowledge would help her successfully transition to Pre-Calc.

FM 9/2020

…I am nervous for her college algebra test. I don’t like that the whole grade rides on one test. I’m trying to help her now with the silly mistakes so she can lessen that for her test. When she misses something on ALEKS it’s usually because she entered it wrong.. 99% of the time her answer is correct on her paper but wrong because she wrote it wrong or mixed up her y’s and x’s🙄 so I’m worried about her final exam that she’ll do the same. ( she just turned 16)

AD 9/2020
My son has taken both CC classes and ASU’s. He felt like ASU’s were harder.

MH 9/2020

My son started the self-paced College Algebra when he was halfway through Saxon Algebra II.  He really enjoyed ALEKS because he does not require a lot of repetition.  He studied any concepts that he had trouble with by youtubing the concept on Khan Academy.  In this particular class, the whole grade is your grade on the Final (check your syllabus as I believe the Instructor paced is different), so that was a lot of pressure.  But, if you master the practice tests, you should have no problem with the Final.  

Another son started this class midway through Saxon Algebra I.  He requires more instruction in math.  But, if you are willing and able to teach math concepts, this can be a good fit for a student that is not confident in math because they have a whole year to complete the course, and if they don’t like their grade, they can repeat it.  

SM 9/2020
The Aug 2020 ASU EA MAT 117, College Algebra Fall 2020 Syllabus for the Instructor Lead course now gives some credit for quizzes and Active Learning Assignments.  The final exam is now only 70% of the final grade. The Self Paced & Instructor paced courses have different syllabi. The most significant difference is that you CAN retake the exam in the Self Paced.  The final exam is 100% of your course grade in the Self Paced course.

DL 11/2020
My son is 14. He has only taken 1 class. it was the self paced Math 117 College Algebra and Problem Solving. This was on the ALEKS platform. He had no interaction with a professor at all (or really anyone at ASU). I had already done Algebra 1 and Algebra 2 with him (Math U See). Math 117 covers some Trig and some Pre-calc so there were new things for him to learn. He did the class in 8 weeks with about 20-45 min a day’s worth of work. He did the proctored exam and scored a 93%. So if the child is solid in math and can work very independently, this would be a decent 1st class.

SM 9/2020
FYI – we noticed changes to this course from previous posts/other terms. The Aug 2020 ASU EA MAT 117, College Algebra Fall 2020 Syllabus for the Instructor Lead course now gives some credit for quizzes and Active Learning Assignments.  The final exam is now only 70% of the final grade.  Additionally, The new syllabus doesn’t say anything about being able to reset the final exam and re-take, but I’m still searching other areas of the course to see if that is possible;). If anyone is currently in the course and finds info about resetting final exam & taking again, please share☺️.  I set my daughter up thinking she could reset & retake based on previous course info and I just want to manage her expectation if that has changed.  Final exam is due by December so I have some time to prep her either way❤️. Thank you to EVERYONE for your help on navigating these courses at ASU.  YOU ARE ALL PHENOMENAL INDIVIDUALS ❤️❤️

**UPDATE: The Self Paced & Instructor paced courses have different syllabi. The most significant difference is that you CAN retake the exam in the in the Self Paced.  The final exam is 100% of your course grade in the Self Paced course.

Q from RPD 9/2020
Does ASU allow the quizzes to be re-set? We are debating between CC and ASU for math. He is able to skip College Algebra & Pre-Calc from his Accuplacer scores, but he states he does not remember a lot of Algebra and wants to have what is needed for ACT/SAT. I also want to help him build math confidence & lessen his hatred of the subject. He is very strong at it, but he dislikes it and, despite great scores, he lacks math confidence. He is a sophomore.

A from SM 9/2020:
The self paced course allows you to ask to have the final exam reset. In the instructor paced course, it states in their, “About Exams,” video that you can only take the final exam once.

I don’t know if this will help you, but if you purchase an ALEKS subscription, not the ASU route, you have access to SAT & ACT prep courses. You can switch around into any of the courses they offer. My son is using that now for his SAT in December.

COMM 100 Intro to Human Communications

Ann D. 5/14/20:

Comm 100 requires 2 500 ish word responses every week which is checked by the computer to see if it meets word count requirements and then graded by a real person. .

The final was based on the included free e textbook. Proctoring is through the usual way ASU does this- video and audio monitoring where you show your room by swiveling your puter and showing the desk and both sides of paper plus showing your ID at the beginning. One of my children considered it but it transfers to Clemson as a free elective; the other is now an ASU online student (free success coach included!). It’s not a speech class – we just had one kid finish an online speech class from a TX community college and that was 3 speeches during the semester + final on readings (was supposed to have 5 people in the audience at home, until Covid came along. The 2nd speech required no audience and #3 was a group project on zoom, each with a 2 min part). Clemson student is taking it from C and that’s also 3 speeches with a group project + final on readings. I suggest you have your people take speech online from a community college.

Ann D. 5/15/2020:

Just checked Texas A&M – Com100 transfers as COMM101; Tx Tech takes it as COMS 1300. UGA counts it as COMM1500. If all these places take it, there’s a good chance another school may count it as your communication requirement.

CS 7/2020

It’s literally about “human communication” and covers everything from body language to advertising. There are two essays due each week… appx 300 words. It’s what I would consider easy for most people. He’s autistic so it’s been very hard for him. (The communication part, not the writing part. He loves writing.) …[tests] cover exactly what’s in the content. No midterm. Just weekly quizzes and a final.

AD 11/2020
There’s writing every week- I think 2 or 3 300 word posts. MC quizzes weekly and midterm & final. It’s been a year since my son took that class.

ENG 101 English Composition

*see combined reviews below also

AE 8/2020
Instructor paced. The English class was a big time commitment for my son, but he’s pretty terrible at writing. Health he absolutely whizzed through. I’d say he spent at least 10 hours per week on English. But he gets hung up all the time and frustrated a lot.

…There is no reading, it’s nearly all videos. Just a lot of writing. I have a dyslexic 9 year old and I think (in the future) these classes would be great for him.

…You can also do “talk to text” and eliminate the actual writing…

LB 9/2020

My daughter, 16, gets tired of the writing prompts for the writers journals in Eng 101

AL 9/2020

My son hates the prompts too – he also hates writing in general, so that’s a factor in any writing program, but it’s good to hear it from others too. (I’m still grateful for the controlled grade on this class though!! )

FM 9/2020

We actually like the writing prompts for journals because one: my daughter doesn’t want to have to think of what to write. Two: it mostly had to do with the upcoming paper which made writing that paper a lot easier since you had already been writing somewhat about it. I do wish the minimum 500 words would change. A lot of times you can get your point across in 300 . 

….she’s 15 so she’s needed a little more explanation from me with the big wording and such but they do a great job providing a rubric for each writing assignment so it hasn’t hindered her.( I watch the videos as well)

They have around 20 journal assignments and 5 big papers. What I have her do to go faster ( she’s not a fast typist) she uses voice to text on Word….They also show them different methods to get your thoughts on paper which has helped her tremendously. She’s signed up to take 102 next.

….the journals have questions you answer. For instance, one was something like..when was your first writing experience and how did you feel about it.. how do you feel about it now, etc. The minimum words recommended was 500 but I’d let her get to 400 and be good😁 because after that she’d be rambling on some journal entries. ( if she was comfortable with a subject she’d get passed 500) Another was after they did a writing method called looping being timed.. the journal topic was something like .. have you ever used this technique, what did you think about it, etc. all their journals and writing projects had good rubrics or tasks to follow so you weren’t left wondering what to do

…in a sense they’re writing about writing but the different aspects and how you use writing; if that makes sense. This course isn’t that you read a book and analyze it, if that’s what she’s looking for. You have a literacy narrative, context analysis, audience analysis, purpose analysis, and then the last one you combine all of the above with a rhetorical analysis. You find your own topic that fits with their rubric. Like the context analysis my daughter wrote about her use of Instagram and how it works and how it works for her business.

….the discussion boards are used more if you have a question or want more clarity but nothing that counts as a grade. They have two peer evaluations but also don’t count as part of your grade. You participating in peer evaluation counts for a bit of your grade, journals, projects and quizzes do. The instructors don’t grade your work either, you self analyze. Which was ok, but I wish they provided feedback at the moment. I did read on one of the teacher’s comments to a student asking about grading that they routinely check the eportfolios so you don’t want to give yourself an excellent grade, but they happen to look at it and see you didn’t actually write according to the rubric or write close to anything they were asking you to write, they could drop you from the class and you don’t get credit due to lack of honesty integrity.

R.A.-
Both of my 10th grade daughters took Eng. Comp. 1  and enjoyed it.  They especially liked the online writers’ journal they had to create. The course consisted of 20 journal entries (app. 500 words each) and 5 major writing pieces.  So, from my perspective, there was a great deal of writing and my daughters spent an enormous time on the assignments (perfectionists lol). Peer and self review were a big part of the course.

RA 11/2020

There were 20 journal entries of app 500 words, 5 major writing compositions of I believe 1,000 (the 5th had to be longer, maybe 1,500-2000?). The rubrics were extremely well organized and clear. In addition to the papers, there were shorter assignments (lots of reflection on your writing, peer reviews, etc.) throughout the course.

There wasn’t a traditional final exam, more like a final project which was the last main composition and the website that includes all the writing pieces that the kids create throughout the course.

Question by E.S. for R.A. 11/2020

Q. Were the subjects ok for a 15 year old as far as you are concerned?

  1. The context was not what I expected lol. It was pretty much all writing about writing. For example analysing the pathos used in a written piece. Not you standard assigned topics like write a persuasive composition.

VG 11/2020
My more literary leaning child took English 101 this summer as a 13yo. She enjoyed it, and we just needed a little bit of help getting signed up and logged in, and she did it all quite independently!

ENG 102 English Composition: Research and Writing

*see combined reviews below also

English Courses combined:

Ann D: 5/7/2020

The computers check to make sure there are adequate word counts, but I remember the self graded portion being a fraction of the final grade. The idea here is to make a good website of what you have created during the course, writing with the lessons covered. Self graded portion was basically an effort score. My kids did receive graded feedback. One of my kids even wrote to the professor and received answers the same hour! I have had 3 kids take ASU’s English 101 and it helped them overcome their fear of college English. 102 is much harder because it involves research. One of my kids took it right after the other took my state’s standard English 1102, same goals. The ASU class allows the kids to choose their own topic of concern, while the state class was very motivated by political correctness. The contrast was stark. My kid with ASU had a good experience and would have enjoyed more weeks of class; my kid in the state class was “done.”

Susan 5/7/2020:

He did work and had to turn it in and he may have received grades for completion. There were peer review grades but I don’t know if their grades were input into the final grade. But no feedback from any ASU staff in 101. If a student hadn’t had much writing and/or was motivated to learn, the course would be helpful. My son did the work and checked the boxes for the grade. He is definitely working in the 102 class.

DR. April 2020:

English Comp I is an 8wk course (although I think there’s a 15wk option as well). Imagine a 16wk English course crammed into 7 ½ weeks; after week 1, there’s an essay due every week. Multiple other smaller projects for as well, including going through modules of info and then taking a quiz. No late work is accepted.

KS. 7/28/20

I really hope the $99 fee will be extended as well. These classes and the opportunity is amazing. My kids LOVE them (one has taken College Algebra, another has taken this Eng Comp class and LOVED it and they are all taking Western Civ currently. They are each signed up for various classes beginning Aug 17. They are actually wishing there was a US History class…we can only hope more will be added. For now, LOVING ASU!

ASM 246 Human Origins

Ann D 4/2020

Human origins is obviously an evolution course; this was a better class than my intro anthropology class at Duke. If you are a creationist, you can teach your child the other side as they go along.

RP 7/2020

No written assignments. Everything so far has been multiple choice. Watch videos, a little bit of supplementary reading which hasn’t really been necessary (the video lectures are sufficient), some online drill assignments that go over key points in a multiple choice format until you get them. That is graded on completion, not score. This is his first ASU course, but I would say that he spends less than an hour a day 5 days a week to complete the work. He will probably increase that a little to study for the proctored final at the end.

GF 7/2020

We found it took more time than Health & Wellness, similar time to Western Civ, and far less time than Astronomy. Very straight forward format with predictable time requirements.

AD 7/2020

…no writing at all. The first of my kids to take the class did this on Sunday afternoons only. That convinced 2 others in the family to give it a shot this summer. I have one kid who is taking ASU’s Human Origins and Ex & Nutrition, and English Lit at another college and spends 5x time on English Lit (already took Western Civ). The best part is she will be exactly a year ahead when she goes back to school in the fall.

…Homework (Cerego) and a weekly quiz due Mondays, after 3 weeks, there’s a non-proctored multiple choice midterm; then a final during the last week covering only weeks 4-7 when a short amount on that week’s quiz.

MB 7/2020
My daughter just finished this class and really enjoyed it. Not a lot of work and she found the material interesting.

Laura D. 7/31/20

My son really enjoyed it, and it led him to some deeper questions, and paired nicely with Western Civ, which he took concurrently. It was harder for him than Western Civ – those are the only ASU courses he’s taken so far.

AK  7/2020
My rising 9th grader and I both took this course. I absolutely loved it! The professor is a well- respected paleoanthropologist who discovered the “Lucy” skeleton in the 70s as well as other more recent finds. He has done PBS specials back in the 80s and his voice sounded so familiar. These were very professional lecture videos and enjoyable to watch. Now from the viewpoint of my son, this was his first college level class and he has dyslexia, he was able to score a B with putting in about 18hrs a week. This was also his first biology class in high school so there were several scientific terms he needed to learn and for a dyslexic discerning between very similar scientific terms like, Australopithecus afarensis and Australopithecus africanis was a challenge but I am so glad he took this class. We used it as a way to learn note taking skills, and try out different study methods for each quiz and see what worked best with his learning style. A few tips, There is a short introductory video before each weeks lecture and I didn’t notice that there is a study guide attached to this until week 4. Very handy to help study for the quizzes. Also we found out at the very end of the course there are study flashcards already created by different students on Quizlet for this exact course. Which might be another way to get a little practice in before a quiz or test.

HEP 100/EXW 100: Introduction to Health and Wellness

NOTE: Course number changed to HEP 100 for 2021

Q: Does this course require weekly discussion posts, signing into the course at particular times, and weekly assignments?

A: No discussion required (it’s optional). There are interactive modules, homework questions and quizzes. The syllabus tells you what is due each week. Right now it’s been 1 or 2 each week from those categories. He enjoys the class and is learning a lot.

Q: Seeking feedback for Western Civ and Health?

A: (Amy B 5/18/20:) My son just finished both of those courses, and did very well. They were pretty polished and put together well. He found both courses interesting.

Gordon F. 5/22/20:

Completed the Health & Wellness course.  It was very enjoyable and a possible “confidence builder” as far as the grade was concerned.  There WERE discussion board posts required in the class (I believe 5% of the grade) so this may have changed from earlier versions.  It is also an interesting course for any parents that may want to take a course, I found it informative.

SK 11/2020
EXW 100: Introduction to Health and Wellness. My 16 yr old daughter did this class this summer. It was her first and she scored an A and liked the class. She did the instructor led version so it had due dates. However no late assignments allowed… she misread the due date one week and missed getting the assignments in by a few hours and was devastated… but fortunately she worked hard to recoup and ended well.

CL 11/2020

Health. HEP 100. Super common sense. I don’t want to say “easy”. The student still has to study. But, it will help the student get used to the weekly pace of discussion questions, quiz, case study, interactive and Cerigo (their review tool), without overwhelming them. My son has all of his work done by Wednesday evening, the material is so clear. He’s getting 98% in the class. I wish it had been his first class. But, ASM246- Paleoanthropology was also great. It was a lot more studying, though, because it wasn’t common sense. It was new material he had to learn and memorize.

1 discussion question per week with a 100 word response and then responding to two peer posts with at least 50 words. The writing requirement has been super easy. It does go through Grammarly review and I read it, as well, before he posts it. Be careful of this. Some of the kids are not having grammar checked and aren’t capitalizing, using periods, commas or even complete sentences. If a TA or professor reads it, they may get docked points, because the syllabus clearly says that grammar matters.

AD 11/2020
Interestingly, the course was changed to HEP 100 for 2021, which is in the Health Education & Promotion department. For those who have already taken the course, nothing will change on your transcript. It’s the exact same class.

FSE 100:  Introduction to Engineering: Imagine. Design. Engineer!

Louisa 7/29/20
Even though this is only a 2 credit hour class there was a huge amount of work. Simple enough but it covered a lot of ground across all types of engineering. This could be helpful if you didn’t understand the differences between different types of engineers and didn’t really know what an engineer does. There was an assignment that utilized an Arduino simulator for a programming assignment. That assignment could have been difficult if you didn’t have any previous experience with Arduinos or similar devices.

ECN 212 Microeconomic Principles: Decision Making Under Scarcity

ECN 211 Macroeconomic Principles

KS 9/2020

Honestly-not an easy [class – Macro]. For me at least…my son feels the same although admittedly I don’t think he was really ready.

Tips: Taking notes, super helpful. Start off by really understanding each and every term and being able to explain it. There are a LOT that are used throughout the course. If you just understand the concepts and not the terms it can bog you down deciphering everything as the weeks go by. The professor has live office hours (virtual obviously). Make sure a list of questions is kept so you can ask them. He’s super approachable and really wants to help. I had hoped to take more notes to be more helpful to those coming after me but with moving day one of class and all that entails it was REALLY bad timing to take a class!! It’s actually one I might drop just because I’m constantly behind and my son just told me he wants to go to a local school-so now there’s applications, transcripts and the like!! Remind me as time goes on and I’ll see if I can think more on other hints!

SM 10/2020

For Macroeconomics, the professor has also offered live Zoom meetings. Students must submit questions in advance and the professor answers questions. They record the session for students who can’t attend.

The TA’s (staff) have been highly responsive in this current session of Macroeconomics AND the Professor has also answered frequently on the discussion boards.

Micro and Macro Econ reviews combined:

Ann 4/2020

I was an econ major but took one of the econs for fun to see how it went. I was very impressed and learned more about sugar subsidies I never knew about. Both econs do a good job of teaching the subject but they are hard.

CS 6/2020

My son started it in March. He’s NOT mathy at all. He thought it was very dry and difficult, so he dropped it. I think he could’ve done well in it, but it just wasn’t his thing, and I knew it wasn’t necessary for his potential majors (it would’ve been an elective if anything). 

AD 6/2020

I was an econ major at Duke and I signed up to take the class with my kids. I thought it was incredibly well done and taught the material better than my class at Duke. Two of my kids made As in both classes, one made Bs in both classes, and all are equally mathy. I can’t explain the difference.

…I actually found the explanations of the graphs in ASU’s classes to make so much more sense than the way I was taught 30 years ago.

…What I learned for the first time in the ASU class was all about sugar subsidies. I had no idea that sugar was so highly subsidized by our own US government so that it is cheaper than the world price. It’s just not efficient to grow sugar in the US. Yet we eat so much of it and have such a high rate of obesity – this part is not brought out.

PAF 112 / CPP 112 National Service and American Democracy 

The course number changed to PAF 112 for 2021

Chrystal 5/19/20

Contrary to popular belief, this is NOT a civics course.  This course requires a ton of writing and uses MLA style.  It is centered around your current involvements (your civic club memberships, religious organizations, etc., which might be difficult for a very young student) and how you can get involved with serving your community. There is a final research paper that is 5 pages (including the title page and citations – approximately 1000-1500 total words). My 14 year old son got an A in the course and really enjoyed it, but it was a lot more work than his other courses, and it was not what he expected.

FSE150 Perspectives on Grand Challenges for Engineering:

MAT 170 Precalculus:

Louisa 7/29/20
We are in progress on this one. It is also through ALEKS. My student tested in really high after taking the MAT117 course above. We are not certain but the ALEKS AI seems to get confused and keeps asking questions in the same category. We’ll let you know how it ends up.

LB 9/2020

I like how the pre-cal tests them every so often to make sure they don’t forget a topic and will add that topic back into their practice work.

Question from MiH 11/2020:
My son is taking the algebra class now and pre- calculus would be next. I understand that this class is also using ALEKS. How much do the two classes overlap? Meaning during their initial placement test, would they score considerably better after just taking the algebra class, making this a faster class if they are already familiar with some of the concepts?

Answer from MaH 11/2020:
My son tested at 39% complete after just finishing the College Algebra test. He got to 50% very quickly. He has slowed down now some as he is getting more into Trig and Geometry concepts(which are completely new to him), but this class is definitely going faster than CA.

Answer from LK 11/2020
From my experience the overlap is about 50 percent. One with 100 percent of the prior class should have 50 percent of the next class.

CSE 110 Programming for Everyone: Introduction to Programming 

CC 9/2020

So far it’s going well. He really enjoys the challenges. I can definitely see where the algebra requirement comes in. They are need to understand the math concepts well enough to build a program using them. My son is thrilled that he can make the computer do the math for him now, LOL.

AL 9/2020

I read a great review for this course last night, by an experienced programmer. He needed the course credit for his degree, so he’s taking it this semester. He said he felt the course was very well done and he wished he had taken this class as his first programming course.

High praise from him!

PS 9/2020

She is really enjoying the programming course. It’s her 1st exposure to the topic. While she did not think she would be into it, the way she is so logically wired, it is a good fit.

LB 9/2020

my daughter, 13, loves her programming course

PS 10/2020

Mad Props for ASU’s programming professor.

Last week my 14-year-old daughter, because she did not want to give away any answers on the discussion board, asked the prof if she could email him some questions. She included a short 16 second video and pictures to go along with each of her three questions. In less than 4 hours the prof responses with a link to a 24 minute youtube video that he created to walk her through each of her questions. Can you say IMPRESSIVE!!!

…She really likes the class. Sometimes I will find her playing around on some of the programs during free time or even showing other family members what she is learning.

Question from SC 10/2020:

Does the professor respond that way, on the discussion board? Or is it run by teaching assistants?

Answer from DD 10/2020:

Both. And the responses have been incredibly timely, like within a few hours of posting the question.

Remember that you can “follow” posts. And then checking the posts becomes even more straightforward, as you’ll be following the ones and getting updates on them.

MF 11/2020
[in response to a question asking for first course recommendations] I would steer clear from the programming class for the first class. My three kids are doing it now, and it is a LOT of work.

My oldest did Econ for her first class. I think it was a really manageable amount of work and the content was taught very directly. My middle child took the sociology class first and it was also a very easy first class, although some content is more mature. I also agree that the Writing courses are a good choice. There is a large volume of work, but it’s almost all self-assessed, so you are virtually guaranteed a good grade for the effort.

HW 11/2020
My 13 year-old took this [Programming course] as his first class and has done well. His personality is very organized and has pretty good time management habits. I think it definitely depends on each individual student! He would not have liked a class with lots of writing as his first experience though!

SOC 101 Introduction to Sociology

Ann D 4/2020

I have one taking sociology currently, which is required by the college major of choice. A sibling recently took sociology on a state college campus and felt like it was an indoctrination class; this one is also dealing with those topics but at least we can talk about our family world view and where we differ.

CEE181 Technological, Social and Sustainable Systems 

HST 102: Western Civilizations / Europe and the Mediterranean: Ancient and Medieval  

(note the name of this course changed to Europe and the Mediterranean Ancient and Medieval in the Fall of 2020, it was previously called Western Civilizations)

Ann D 4/2020:

Western Civ was great! I took this when the kids did and learned a bunch. 

Cali O. 5/18/20

There are 7 modules but 8 weeks with a final exam. Plus one self assessment designed project.

Non-proctored midterm half way thru. Final exam proctored based on weeks 4 thru 7

There are two live sessions offered thru YouTube with Dr. MOULTON, The recording of the lecture is posted after. There are quizzes for the 7 weeks. And there is also content mastery, gives you time lines and cities and battles, you can access that over and over for studying.

Q: How much writing was in the two classes? [Western Civ and Health and Wellness]

A: (by Ann D and Chrystal S 5/18/20: None for western civ.

Q: Seeking feedback for Western Civ and Health?

A: (Amy B 5/18/20:) My son just finished both of those courses, and did very well. They were pretty polished and put together well. He found both courses interesting.

A: (Cali O. 5/18/20) 

There are 7 modules but 8 weeks with final exam.  Plus one self assessment designed project.

Non proctorerd mid term half way thru.  Final exam proctored based on week’s 4 thru 7 

There are two live sessions offered thru YouTube with Dr. MOULTON,  The recording of the lecture is posted after.  

There are quizzes for the 7 weeks. And there is also content mastery, gives you time lines and cities and battles, you can access that over and over for studying. 

Gordon F. 5/22/20:

My son took Western Civ and enjoyed it.  He is 14 and the greatest challenge was helping him to realize that it is imperative that he gets as many “freebies” in the course as possible so he can reduce the pressure of the proctored exam at the end.   He often wanted to quickly “answer” the quiz questions at the end of each week.  We reminded him that you only get one shot at it, and if he wasn’t sure, there was only a little bit of extra effort involved in looking up the answer. That being said, he did very well, all on his own.

AB 7/2020

She enjoyed the class, thought it was interesting. There was great attention to trade and economics. The Jewish culture has longer videos and lots of information. She learned a lot.

She did do instructor led.

…she did not believe she would’ve done as well on the finals without Quizlet. It was a tremendous help for her.

https://quizlet.com/376790998/hst-102-final-exam-asu-hst102-weeks-4-7-flash-cards/

KS. 7/28/20

I really hope the $99 fee will be extended as well. These classes and the opportunity is amazing. My kids LOVE them (one has taken College Algebra, another has taken this Eng Comp class and LOVED it and they are all taking Western Civ currently. They are each signed up for various classes beginning Aug 17. They are actually wishing there was a US History class…we can only hope more will be added. For now, LOVING ASU!

10/1/2020: My three oldest, rising junior, freshman, and eighth grader, took this course over the summer. They really enjoyed it, found the material good, thoughtful, thorough, while still being attainable (my 8th grader is pretty advanced, and my 9th grade struggles with reading comprehension) – they all passed with flying colors. It was fun for them to have a design project – they like things like that. We found it also paired well with Human Origins, if you’re looking for your next class (Human Origins was much more difficult, however). 

JK 11/2020
The Western Civ class is pretty easy with Final accounting for 20 percent, so if they do well in class, quizzes they could be going into final with a B 🙂 my son usually bombs important tests so this allows him to work hard and then not have to put too much pressure on himself at the end.

Question 11/2020: This is probably our next class. Are there any maturity concerns for younger students taking this class? I’d also like to hear opinions of anything to watch out for more conservative, young earth Creationists. 🙂 I’m not opposed to them hearing differing perspectives. I just like to be aware and ready to discuss.

I think this one would be safe, but I’ve been surprised a few times.

Answer: from DD 11/2020: We are in it now. Ancient times were barbaric. There has (thus far) been discussion about violence on women, sex/birth by age 14, incest, and circumcision, mature topics, but nothing completely jaw dropping in nature.

I’m not a YEC, so nothing re: that specifically stands out to me (as opposed to AST111, which is a class I know for certain that a YEC would be confronted with some conflicting information)

LF 11/2020:
We’ve been enjoying The Great Courses entitled, “Warriors, Queens, and Intellectuals” along with The Western Civilization course. There are lectures on Hilegarde of Bingen, Anna Comena, Eleanor of Aquitaine and Empress Theodora.

All Courses

Ann D. (5/7/2020):

Western Civ was great! I took this when the kids did and learned a bunch. I was an econ major but took one of the econs for fun to see how it went. I was very impressed and learned more about sugar subsidies I never knew about. Both econs do a good job of teaching the subject but they are hard. Communication was a writing class-. 500-750 words per week, plus exams on the readings/lectures. Astronomy was fun and math intensive. Chemistry was very hard, lots more math, and has fantastic simulated labs I really appreciate. Calculus for social science is real calculus. Don’t underestimate it.

Cis 105 was not well done. The assignments and tests seemed disconnected from the lectures. Human origins is obviously an evolution course; this was a better class than my intro anthropology class at Duke. If you are a creationist, you can teach your child the other side as they go along. I have one taking sociology currently, which is required by the college major of choice. A sibling recently took sociology on a state college campus and felt like it was an indoctrination class; this one is also dealing with those topics but at least we can talk about our family world view and where we differ.

Question and Answers:

Question from Susancan you tell me anything about the ASU courses? 

Answer by Danika R.: They are all different, so it’s hard to say. I can give you info on 3.

College Algebra and Precalculus are self-paced, and are just ALEKS math.

English Comp I is an 8wk course (although I think there’s a 15wk option as well). Imagine a 16wk English course crammed into 7 ½ weeks; after week 1, there’s an essay due every week. Multiple other smaller projects for as well, including going through modules of info and then taking a quiz. No late work is accepted.

*********************

Question from Angela B: the classes that are NOT self-paced, are there specific times of the day to be present during class?

Answer from Danika R

no, there are weekly deadlines (at least there was for the English Comp 1 course).

Answer from Susan:

Deadlines, but no specific class meeting times.

Ann D. 3/2020:

All the other (not self-paced) EA ASU classes are by the week. You watch/read when you can, and things are due essentially Monday night (time is in UT, and in Eastern Time, is usually about 3 am Tues.)

**********************

Proctoring:

Ann D 5/14/20: 

Proctoring is through the usual way ASU does this- video and audio monitoring where you show your room by swiveling your puter and showing the desk and both sides of paper plus showing your ID at the beginning. 

What colleges accept ASU Credits?

Ann D 5/2020:

My DD has transferred 24 college credits from ASU to Clemson. They also transfer to UofAlabama, UGA, U South Carolina, Auburn.

Carla B 5/2020:

I have checked several colleges across the country in my searches for understanding of this college acceptance game. ASU credits are widely accepted . BUT , as is the case with any colleges, they pick and choose which apply toward a degree or fulfill Gen ed’s. I checked Virginia Tech yesterday . Sure enough they accept a ton of ASU credits. However, there were many not on their list. It makes searching such a pain.

Andrea L 4/2020:

DCCCD (Dallas CC) confirmed they will accept ENG 101 English Composition 1 for 1301 English Composition 1, and it replaces the need for the writing TSI as long as it’s a C or better. (ASU won’t transcript less than a C)

Ann D 3/2020:

The big southern football schools take almost all of ASU’s offerings and they fulfill many requirements of freshman year that I would not want to take on campus – 2 English clases and sociology fit in that category! (We have not tried ASU sociology yet, but freshman kid’s big state U sociology class was very PC, and Eng 102 at a different state school she said should have been entitled “Writing about Feminist Theory.”)

Transcript Fee?

ASU charges $20 per transcript

Ann D 5/16/2020:

Using Parchment for transcript transfer we have only paid $15 for official transcripts from ASU. 

Question: Is there an age limit?

Answer: No age limit. They just need a government issued ID w/Photo. 

ID’s people have used that we know of:

Driver’s license/permit

Passport

DoD dependent ID

Public School ID w/photo and name on it (ASU’s help line suggested this)

Umbrella School ID (made w/permission from the umbrella school admin, since they don’t normally have a photo ID)

Homeschool ID w/name of Homeschool, photo and student’s name ( I’m surprised they accepted it. It looked very official and we are considered Private Schools in TX, so maybe that’s why. Ymmv!  May the odds be ever in your favor!)

When the class is over, does the student still have access to the course content?

Chrystal S. 7/24/20

Answer: When it’s finished, but not paid, it still shows up. After it’s added to the transcript, no.

Q: ASU Admissions Requirements for Lab Credits (if you are homeschooled and want to attend as a regular student, not applicable to the EA courses which do not thave this requirement):

A: Home Schooled students can earn credit for the three years of lab science required for admission to ASU the following ways:

– three years of a different lab science taken through home school or online but evaluation of lab science forms will be required

– three dual enrollment lab science courses taken at comm college in different subject areas – no lab form required if comm college transcript is submitted

– take three of the following four tests and get the minimum required score:

  1. ACT Science (20)
    SAT Biology Subject Test (590)
    SAT Chemistry Subject Test (600)
    SAT Physics Subject Test (620)

In regards to the Chemistry for Engineers course you would want to speak with someone from ASU Earned Admission to see if that course is accepted as a lab science requirement for admission to ASU. (later confirmed this is fine)

He can combine many different modalities to obtain the three years of lab science needed for admission. For example, he could have the ACT science score of 20 or above, have taken a homeschool lab science course and we approved the lab form and taken a comm college science course as dual enrollment as he would be good.Please remember though that the three years have to be different lab sciences (1 year each from biology, chemistry, earth science, integrated sciences or physics)

Hope this makes sense. Please let me know how else I can assist you.

Thanks, Corey

Lab form from ASU:
https://admission.asu.edu/sites/default/files/general/science_form_home_school_applications-fillable.pdf?fbclid=IwAR0X2K-lqW1VhU9OLzuqIxyaMbzI_iZXi9KCpagKQ4kbR7cY-M9mzGFS6Ps