Posted in cost map

Liberty University *ONLINE*

Homeschooling for College Credit at Liberty University (Online)

Listen to a brief introduction to this cost map:


Rack Rate Tuition: $46,800 ($390 per credit x 120 credits)

Resourcefully Planned:  $16,780 (78 credits in homeschool,  42 cr. taken through Liberty online once enrolled)


Degree:  Bachelor of Arts, Pre-Law  (note, Liberty University also offers law school that can begin after completion of the bachelor’s degree for a seamless transition.)

Note:  Liberty University requires 25% of the degree to be earned through Liberty University online, thus 75% of the degree can be completed during or after homeschool and transferred in before starting classes with Liberty.  Students who do that will save the most money and begin their studies at Liberty University Online as a college senior.

What is a resourcefully planned degree?  In short, a cost map shows you how Homeschooling for College Credit in high school can be transferred into a specific college to save money.  We’ll use alternative college credit sources that are accepted by this college to devise a strategic plan for your student.  The cost map is a general outline that gets you headed in the right direction.

What a Resourcefully Planned Cost Map is NOT:  It’s not a guarantee.  This is an informed DIY plan using the college’s advertised transfer and credit acceptance policies.

Why DIY?  As the parent of a high school student, you won’t have access to academic advisors or the registrar of a college, in addition, colleges don’t specialize in helping you avoid taking their classes!  But, college transfer protocol and transfer policies are often available to the public, allowing teens to start earning college credit NOW that can be used LATER.

Where is Dual Enrollment?  Since some families have free tuition through dual enrollment, while other families may not, dual enrollment has been completely left out of the plan. If you have dual enrollment available to you, you may want to use it.

NOTE:  Liberty University Online has a dual enrollment program currently $550/course. If you are certain that your teen is pursuing a degree at Liberty University, you can save considerable money completing some of the “25% required” Liberty courses by using dual enrollment, specifically the Christian Life core (12 credits).  This is only available during 10th-12th grade.  High school graduates will have to pay full tuition.

Other costs:  Colleges will have other costs beyond the scope of our basic tuition calculation.  Application fee, graduation fee, technology fee, etc. are all fees that you should plan for when your teen eventually enrolls.  To keep the playing field even, the rack rate listed above doesn’t include fees either – the numbers shown are straight tuition.


Rack Rate Tuition:  $46,800

Resourcefully Planned:  $16,780

$400 would be paid throughout high school for the first 78 credits (cash). 

The remaining  42 credits will cost $16,380 at Liberty. (apply for scholarships)


How to avoid student loan debt

  1. Reduce the number of credits your teen must complete by doing as many of them as possible in high school.
  2. Secure scholarships, apply for Federal work-study and use savings/cash to cover the balance of tuition once you’re an enrolled student.
  3. Only after you’ve exhausted options 1 & 2 should you consider borrowing money.

Cost Map for Liberty University (Residential Program)  (12/2018)

Requirement Homeschooling for College Credit Approximate cost taken during homeschool

$400

Cost if taken through Liberty University online

$46,800

ENGL101 CLEP College Composition $0* $1,170
Communication Elective DSST Tech Writing $100 $1,170
Math 114 or higher CLEP College Math $0* $1,170
Natural Science CLEP Biology (+3 cr. overage) $0* $2,340
INFT110 CLEP Information Systems $0* exam attempt $0

$1,170

Cultural Elective DSST Anthropology $100 $1,170
American Govt. CLEP American Government $0* $1,170
Composition Elective DSST Advanced English $100 $1,170
Info Literacy Ele. CSIS110 DSST Mgmt. Info Systems $100 $1,170
Electives CLEP US History 1 & 2 $0* $2,340
Electives CLEP American Literature (+3 cr. overage) $0* $2,340
Literature CLEP Analyzing Interpreting Literature w/ESSAY $0* $1,170
Social Science Elective CLEP Social Science and History (+3 cr. overage) $0* $2,340
Add’l electives choose any AP or CLEP not previously listed** $0 $5,850
12 cr. Christian Life and Thought Series If waived, replace with CLEP/AP** Waived  when transferring in >60 credits $0*

or

$1,650 through dual enrollment

$4,680
42 credits Pre-Law Major Govt. NA NA $16,380
$400  $46,800

*Modern States is currently awarding vouchers to cover CLEP and AP exam fees as well as testing center fees.  You can obtain a free voucher through their website. 

Liberty University Catalog

List of approved general education electives for online students

**Liberty’s CLEP exam list

Liberty’s DSST exam list

Liberty’s AP Exam List

Need help from scratch?   Start here –> Homeschooling for College Credit

Want to know more about the types of college credit used in this chart? –>  Take me there.

See more Cost Maps

Posted in financial aid, Scholarships, Transfer Credit, working

Saving and Shaving: Debt-Free College

Debt free college, is it possible?  It is- but it won’t be easy!  Debt-free college isn’t a matter of just having a huge bank account, rich uncle or perfect SAT scores.  Average parents with almost no college savings can send their (large) homeschool families to college debt-free, but it takes planning and exceptional motivation!

Who has time?  You have to make time.  As a homeschool parent, you’re in a prime position to dedicate an extra two or three hours per week to your new “job” as a high school guidance counselor and college financial aid planner.  If you need an extra nudge, know that those extra three hours per week (150 hours per year) can save you $50,000 or more per child! This might be the most important (and best-paying) part-time job you’ve ever had.


Important Steps to Debt-Free College

Make a commitment to avoid loans.   Not to be glossed over, some may be tempted to think “yeah, we’ll do what we can, but if we have to borrow, we will.” That approach almost always undermines your determination to go hard at a goal.  If you absolutely set a conviction to borrow ZERO dollars, you’ll be amazed at how resourceful you can become.  Plus, you need to know it’s possible – it is.

Calculate the tuition.  For a bachelor’s degree, your teen will earn 120 college credits.  Credits cost money, so figure out what the college expects you to pay per credit.  If it’s $200 per credit (x120) you’re looking at $24,000.  If it’s $500 per credit (x120) you’re looking at $60,000.  If it’s $2000 per credit, you’re looking at one of the most expensive colleges in the country- and there are about 50 in that price range!

Inexpensive tuition does not always equal an inexpensive degree. Saving the most money is usually dependent upon how many credits you can transfer in- keep reading.

Homeschool for college credit.  Homeschooling parents can align their teen’s high school courses with college credit opportunities, many of which are free or very low cost. College credit earned in high school costs about $35 per credit – roughly $100 per class.  There are more and less expensive options, but by paying for 1 college credit course each semester of high school, a family may pay only $200-$300 (cash) per year in tuition.  The average family who homeschools for college credit will graduate a teen with 1 year of college already complete.  A few very motivated families have graduated teens with 2 or more years, and a few have aligned their entire high school education to result in a bachelor’s degree at high school graduation.  Remember that homeschooling for college credit isn’t successful without a motivated student too.

Exploit transfer policy to the max.  Whether in high school or out, before your teen sets foot on their campus, be sure you’ve shaved off the maximum number of allowable transfer credits.  A good number of colleges (about 25% of them) allow you to transfer in 75% of your degree before you start!  The majority of colleges (about half) allow you to transfer in half your degree, and the remaining 25% of colleges have tight transfer criteria or don’t allow transfer at all.  Schools with tight / limited transfer policy will always require you to spend the most money.  While I would encourage you to reconsider your college choice, if you’re determined to attend a limited transfer school anyway, your teen will need to focus on earning everything through scholarships (see below).

Why transfer?  Because whatever the rack rate tuition is for your target college, you can find transfer credit for less money.  There are 30 ways to earn college credit on this website, and all are significantly less money than what your target college will charge for tuition.  Max out the transfer policy first!   If you want to see what this looks like, be sure to check out our Cost Maps – maximizing transfer credit is my superpower.  Before you write a single check, you should have the maximum allowable transfer- only then can you see what you *really* have to pay for.

Rack rate: $100,000 – max transfer (50%) = $50,000 left to pay

Rack rate: $80,000 – max transfer (30%) = $56,000 left to pay

As you can see, the rack rate is part of the math, but it’s not the full picture.  Assuming you will take advantage of max transfer (and pay a fraction of the cost) you can sometimes attend a more expensive college for less money.  This is before scholarships!

Rack rate:  $80,000 – max transfer (75%) = $20,000 left to pay

Rack rate:  $80,000 – max transfer (90%) = $8,000 left to pay

The trick is finding a way to earn college credit as early as possible (high school) for as cheaply as possible and max the transfer policy as fully as possible.  Remember that credit earned in high school averages about $35 per credit.  After high school, you can still keep earning transfer credit, and you can use the community college if necessary (averages about $100/credit).  No matter how you slice it, you want to get your “left to pay” amount as low as possible.

The amount you have left to pay is your starting point for funding!

Apply for scholarships.  Like any good extremist, I don’t mean applying for “a” scholarship, I mean applying for scholarships like it’s your job.  Every week. Every. Single. Week.  From now until your teen is walking across the stage and being handed their degree.  My good friend and scholarship guru Jocelyn Paonita Pearson is exceptionally skilled at teaching parents how to win with scholarships. She runs a company called The Scholarship System. If you’d like to hear what she’s all about, I highly recommend listening to her being interviewed on  Higher Ed Parthenon podcast (episode #22).  She has skills!! In short, no matter what your tuition balance after maxing out your transfer, you can probably cover it with scholarships.

Apply for financial aid.  I realize that this seems like it should happen “before” you apply for scholarships, but I want you to focus all of your effort on lowering your “left to pay” portion by getting it down to zero or close to it before you’ve ever filled out a single financial aid form.  Since high school students are not eligible for federal financial aid anyway, most of the credit earned toward your transfer max happens in high school or before enrollment.  In other words, Mom and Dad’s homework starts in high school!

The typical time to apply is October of their senior (12th grade) year.  You’ll begin by filling out the FAFSA. It’s an online form that everyone fills out and is used by all colleges.  The application is then sent to your selected colleges (assuming you have selected colleges) and a “package” is created by each college.  The package may include scholarships issued by the college based on SAT scores or other academic merits, and it may include a Pell Grant (up to $6,000) based on financial need – but the rest of the “package” is loans!  So when people say they don’t qualify for financial aid, they’re wrong- everyone qualifies for student loans (short of having a criminal history).

Refuse the loans.  Believe it or not, student loans are so common, that your college will create a “budget” for your student that not only includes tuition, but also their “living expenses” for the year.  When they’ve computed this (inflated) total, they’ll happily provide an opportunity to take a student loan to cover all the costs (real or imagined).  Refuse the loans! Debt free means no acquiring debt to pay for college, and if you accept the loans, you are taking on debt.  You can, however, accept any grants or scholarships that the college has to offer- these do not need to be repaid, they are gifts. You can also participate in a work-study or college-sponsored internship program (instead of a paycheck, the wage goes toward tuition or college credit).

Working, it’s what adults do.  If you’ve resourcefully planned your teen’s high school years, and you’ve maxed out their transfer credit allowance, and are applying for scholarships every week, I hope your balance left to pay is zero, but if it’s not, it’s time to go to work.  Work isn’t a punishment, it’s the entire point of earning a degree- to launch a career!

If your teen is studying to become a chef, they should work weekends in a restaurant.  Future nurses should work weekends as a CNA.  Computer specialists should work the help desk, and future anythings can work weekends as temporary anythings.  In short, working is for everyone.  If you can find a way to tie it into a future career, all the better.  If not, do it anyway.  A teen working weekends (15 hours) at minimum wage can contribute almost $5,000 per year toward tuition.  A summer working full time (at minimum wage) can generate another $3,000.  If your teen chooses carefully, some employers will pay a portion of their tuition too! 


recipeRecipe for Debt Free College

From the kitchen of Chef Jennifer Cook-DeRosa

Amount Ingredient
5 minutes Commitment
5 minutes Tuition calculation
3 years Homeschool for College Credit
   
   
Method of Preparation

 1.  Blend your commitment and tuition calculation in a large bowl.

2.  Homeschool for college credit while resourcefully planning and correcting for time, talent, and temperament.

3.  Bake for 3 years.

4.  During the final year of baking, apply for scholarships and financial aid.  Be sure to refuse the loans, or they’ll ruin your recipe!

5.  Adjust for seasoning to taste with a little bit of hard work.

 

 

Posted in cost map

Liberty University *RESIDENTIAL*

Homeschooling for College Credit at Liberty University (Residential Program)

Listen to a brief overview of this cost map


Rack Rate Tuition: $95,200 ($23,800 per year x 4 years)

Resourcefully Planned:  $26,066 (88 credits in homeschool, 32 cr. taken at Liberty)


Degree:  Bachelor of Arts, History

Note:  Liberty University requires 25% of the degree to be earned at Liberty University, thus 75% of the degree can be completed during or after homeschool and transferred in.  Students who do that will save the most money and begin their studies at Liberty as a college senior.

What is a resourcefully planned degree?  In short, a cost map shows you how Homeschooling for College Credit in high school can be transferred into a specific college to save money.  We’ll use alternative college credit sources that are accepted by this college to devise a strategic plan for your student.  The cost map is a general outline that gets you headed in the right direction.

What a Resourcefully Planned Cost Map is NOT:  It’s not a guarantee.  This is an informed DIY plan using the college’s advertised transfer and credit acceptance policies.

Why DIY?  As the parent of a high school student, you won’t have access to academic advisors or the registrar of a college, in addition, colleges don’t specialize in helping you avoid taking their classes!  But, college transfer protocol and transfer policies are often available to the public, allowing teens to start earning college credit NOW that can be used LATER.

Where is Dual Enrollment?  Since some families have free tuition through dual enrollment, while other families may not, dual enrollment has been completely left out of the plan. If you have dual enrollment available to you, you may want to use it.

NOTE:  Liberty University Online has a dual enrollment program currently $550/course.

Other costs:  Colleges will have other costs beyond the scope of our basic tuition calculation.  Application fee, graduation fee, technology fee, etc. are all fees that you should plan for when your teen eventually enrolls.  To keep the playing field even, the rack rate listed above doesn’t include fees either – the numbers shown are straight tuition.


Rack Rate Tuition:  $95,200

Resourcefully Planned:  $26,066 

$700 would be paid throughout high school for the first 88 credits (cash). 

The remaining  $25,366 due to Liberty once enrolled (apply for scholarships).


How to avoid student loan debt

  1. Reduce the number of credits your teen must complete by doing as many of them as possible in high school.
  2. Secure scholarships, apply for Federal work-study and use savings/cash to cover the balance of tuition once you’re an enrolled student.
  3. Only after you’ve exhausted options 1 & 2 should you consider borrowing money.

Cost Map for Liberty University (Residential Program)  (12/2018)

Requirement Homeschooling for College Credit Approximate cost taken during homeschool

$26,066

Cost if taken through Liberty Residential

$95,200

ENGL101 CLEP College Composition $0* $2,382
Communication Elective DSST Tech Writing $100 $2,382
Math 114 or higher CLEP College Math $0* $2,382
Natural Science CLEP Biology $0* $2,382
INFT110 CLEP Information Systems $0* exam attempt $0

$2,382 course

UNIV101 NA $794 $794
INQR101 NA $794 $794
Composition Elective DSST Advanced English $100 $2,382
Info Literacy Ele. CSIS110 DSST Mgmt. Info Systems $100 $2,382
Info Literacy Ele. NA $2,382 $2,382
Research RSCH201 NA $2,382 $2,382
Literature CLEP Analyzing Interpreting Literature w/ESSAY $0* $2,382
Social Science Elective CLEP Social Science and History $0* $2,382
Philosophy elective DSST Ethics in America $100 $2,382
12 cr. Christian Life and Thought Series If waived, replace with CLEP/AP Waived  when transferring in >60 credits $0* $9,528
 12 cr. same foreign language CLEP French, German, or Spanish $0* $9,528
Integrative Elective NA $2,382 $2,382
Western Civ 1&2 CLEP Western Civ 1&2 $0* $4,764
US History 1 & 2 CLEP US History 1&2 $0* $4,764
History elective DSST Vietnam War $100 $2,382
US History elect. DSST Civil War $100 $2,382
Euro History ele. DSST Soviet Union $100 $2,382
Electives 9 CLEP overage from biology, literature, social sciences $0 NA
GEOG200 AP Human Geography $0 $2,382
History Major (21 cr. remain) NA $16,632 $16,632
$26,066 $95,200

*Modern States is currently awarding vouchers to cover CLEP and AP exam fees as well as testing center fees.  You can obtain a free voucher through their website. 

 

Liberty University Catalog

List of approved general education electives for residential students

Liberty’s CLEP exam list

Liberty’s DSST exam list

Liberty’s AP Exam List

Need help from scratch?   Start here –> Homeschooling for College Credit

Want to know more about the types of college credit used in this chart? –>  Take me there.

See more Cost Maps

Posted in CLEP

CLEP Revisions: Now What?

So, you’ve possibly heard the news:  CLEP revised 1/2 of their catalog on December 1st – leaving many of us a little shocked and asking the question, “now what?” 

Don’t worry, this is not bad news, it’s just news.  More importantly, every revision appears in this post, so going forward, you’ll have all the tools you need to have your teen ready for their next CLEP exam (revised or not!)  Resourceful high school planning means that flexibility is our friend, and we’ll adapt without missing a beat!  So, we’ll dry our tears and march forward!!

What didn’t change

  • Content:  Content is content is content.  The “meat” of the exam is content, and no matter what subject or what test we’re talking about, the content is the same.  If you’re part way through a US History textbook or finishing up French 3, you’re going to be fine with content.  Keep learning.
  • Structure:  The testing structure has remained the same.  CLEP is still a multiple choice exam offering pass/fail college credit for a passing score.
  • Cost:  CLEP exams currently cost $87 and generally carry a small testing center fee of around $20.  The revised exams brought no change to the cost.  One thing to note, you can currently take CLEP exams for free when you earn a voucher through Modern States.  We strongly suggest you pay $0 for ALL of your CLEP exams!
  • Passing Scores:  Passing an exam still requires a scaled score of 50.  It’s possible that the number of questions required to hit a 50 may have changed, we’ll never know because that remains confidential.  (individual colleges may ask for higher scores)

What changed?

  • Distribution of topics:  This is the biggest change for a few exams, and it refers to the breakdown of what is covered.  You’ll see examples below, but in short, an old exam may have dedicated 3% to a certain topic, and the new exam may now dedicate 6%.  If you’re taking an updated exam with a new distribution, you need to be sure your test prep aligns well.
  • Questions:  We can assume all new exams have added/revised/removed questions from the question bank.

Distribution Comparison

To compare the “old” exam distribution of topics against the “new” distribution, I’ve turned to my 2016 Official CLEP Study Guide and am comparing it against the CLEP Official Website’s overview page which shows current distributions.

I’ve done a careful comparison of all exams from 2016, and found that 3 exams have had distribution changes.  To save space, I’ve not copied the entire exam distribution, just the changes.  Refer to CLEP’s official website for full exam distributions and read how to use CLEP in your homeschool here.

Intro. Business Law 

Category:  Contracts OLD 25%-35% –> NEW 30%–40%
Category:  Legal Environment OLD 25% -30% –> NEW 20%–25%


History of the United States I 

Category: Political institutions, political dev, and public policy OLD 35% –>NEW 30%
Category: Social developments OLD 25% –> NEW 30%
Category: Cultural and intellectual developments OLD 15% –> NEW 20%
Category: Diplomacy and international relations OLD 15% –> NEW 10%


Human Growth and Development 
NEW TOPIC –> Biological (in Theoretical Perspectives)
NEW TOPIC–>Ecological (in Theoretical Perspectives)

Category: Research Strategies and Methodology OLD 5% –> NEW 6%

Category: Biological Development the Life Span OLD 10% –> NEW 12%

NEW TOPIC –> Genetic disorders (in Biological Development, moved from atypical dev.)

Category: Perceptual Development Throughout the Life Span OLD 7% –> NEW 6%
NEW TOPIC –> Habituation (in Perceptual Development)

Intelligence Throughout the Life Span OLD 4% –> NEW 6%
NEW TOPIC –>Giftedness (in Intelligence, moved from atypical Dev.)
NEW TOPIC –>Intelligence tests (in Intelligence)
NEW TOPIC –> Reaction range (in Intelligence)

Social Development Throughout the Life Span OLD 10% –> NEW 12%
NEW TOPIC –> Social learning and modeling (in Social Development)

Schooling, Work, and Interventions OLD 5% –> NEW 6%
NEW TOPIC –> Operant conditioning (in Schooling, Work…)

Category Renamed –>  Developmental Psychopathology OLD 5% –> NEW 6%
NEW TOPIC –> Anxiety and mood disorders (in Psychopathology)


 

We observed no change to the distribution for:

French Language

English Literature

College Composition (essay)

College Modular (no essay)

American Government

History of the United States II

Intro. Educational Psychology

Intro. Psychology

Intro. Sociology

Calculus

Chemistry

Natural Sciences

Humanities


Other important information about CLEP exams

7 Ways to Fail Your CLEP Exam

College Level Exam Program (CLEP)

CLEP for 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th Grades

Member Question: CLEP Registration before 10th grade?

CLEP Expiration / Revision Dates (see when the next changes are expected)

Posted in Uncategorized

CLEP Spanish *Perfect Score*

It’s one thing to pass a CLEP exam, it’s another to crush it!  Homeschooling for College Credit parent Scarlett has agreed to share her feedback about the exam with you.  At the bottom of the post, I’ve added links and additional info you’ll find helpful if this test is on your schedule.  Don’t miss the link to Modern States – they are giving out free CLEP vouchers, allowing you to take this exam for free!

College Level Exam Program (CLEP)
Good transferability
Official CLEP Spanish page


Scarlett C.

“I took the Spanish exam and passed with an 80. [editor’s comment: 80 is a perfect score].  Even though I’m very happy with my score, I did find some pieces to be more difficult than expected.

I had two segments of listening questions followed by 72 written questions. The first listening segment was fairly easy basic comprehension. You’re asked to complete the phrase or provide an answer that makes the most sense. Here’s an example (in English)

Speaker: How will you be getting to the theater?
A) I’m watching a great movie at the theater
B) Pablo just went to the theater
C) I’ll take the bus
D) It’s cold outside

I found that a good majority of questions in the first section were like this, easy, but they would throw in a few tricky questions to confuse someone who barely understands Spanish. In the above example, the novice speaker would hear the word “Theater” which is first-year Spanish, and then be tempted to answer with the same familiar word. There would also generally be one ridiculous answer.

The second audio section was a challenge. To give you some background, I am a non-native speaker that lived in Mexico for six years. The last two years I was there I spoke almost no English, even at work.

In the second section, a paragraph or a dialogue was read and then we had to answer questions related to the discussion. The audio was very clear, but the accents in each piece were very different. I didn’t hear many Mexican accents, which made things a bit more difficult.

There were also a few tricky questions. My advice would be to take notes if you can possibly do this while still paying attention to what you’re hearing. I found that when items were listed such as “I went on vacation to England, France, and Germany,” you could guarantee that you would be asked which countries they went to. This doesn’t sound difficult, other than the fact that the dialogue would contain quite a bit of information and I had trouble remembering everything that they said even though my comprehension is almost perfect.

The written portion started off easy and then got progressively more difficult. You’ll really need to know your verb tenses and also be comfortable with lo, le, las, les…

There’s really not a lot that you can do to study for this if you don’t have a good grasp of the language. If you’re a good reader but have trouble listening, I would say to try and join a Spanish club or make a Spanish-speaking friend. Watching Spanish TV might help, but the listening was much easier and more clear than anything you’ll hear on TV. So, if you can watch Telemundo and understand, you’ll have no problems.

One last point: This was my first CLEP and I sat through the on-screen tutorial. My testing center guide mentioned that the tutorial was more important on the Spanish CLEP than for other tests. This is because there are many different types of test questions and you’ll need to know how to answer them. Watching the tutorials were very helpful and don’t take time away from your test.

Buena Suerte!  -Scarlett


Score Information

Credit-Granting Score for Spanish Language

Score range:  20-80

Level 1
ACE Recommended Score*: 50
College Credits Awarded: 6

Level 2
ACE Recommended Score*: 63
College Credits Awarded: 9

Each institution reserves the right to set its own credit-granting policy, which may differ from that above.


From the CLEP Official Spanish Page:

Overview

The Spanish Language exam is designed to measure knowledge and ability equivalent to that of students who have completed one to two years of college Spanish language study.

Material taught during both years is incorporated into a single exam, covering both Level 1 and Level 2 content.

Exam Structure

The exam contains approximately 121 questions to be answered in approximately 90 minutes. Some of these are pretest questions that won’t be scored. There are three separately timed sections. The three sections are weighted so that each question contributes equally to the total score. Any time that test takers spend on tutorials or providing personal information is in addition to the actual testing time.

There are two listening sections and one reading section. Each section has its own timing requirements.

Listening Sections

  • The two listening sections together are approximately 30 minutes long.
  • The amount of time you’ll have to answer a question varies according to the section and doesn’t include the time you spend listening to the test material.
  • Timing begins after the section directions are dismissed.
  • You can change the volume by using the Volume testing tool.
  • The audio portions of the listening sections will be presented only once.

Reading Section

  • The reading section is 60 minutes long.

Knowledge and Skills Required

Questions on the Spanish Language exam require test takers to comprehend written and spoken Spanish. The subject matter is drawn from the abilities described below. The percentages next to the main topics indicate the approximate percentage of exam questions on each.

Section I (15%)
Listening: Rejoinders

Listening comprehension through short oral exchanges. Choose the response that most logically continues or completes each conversation. You’ll have 10 seconds to choose your response before the next conversation begins.
Try sample questions

Section II (25%)
Listening: Dialogues and Narratives

Listening comprehension through longer spoken selections. You’ll hear a series of selections, such as dialogues, announcements, and narratives. Each audio selection is accompanied by a graphic or picture and is followed by one or more questions.

The questions have various formats. Some questions offer four possible responses, each with an oval to click to indicate your answer. Other questions ask you to select part of a graphic, fill out a table, or put a list in the correct order. For some of these questions, you’ll have to click in more than one place to complete your response. Be sure to follow the specific directions for each question.

You’ll have a total of 12 minutes to answer the questions in this section. Note: The timer is activated only when you’re answering questions.

In this section, you may adjust the volume only when a question is on your screen. It will affect the volume of the next audio prompt you hear. You can’t change the volume while the audio prompt is playing.
Try sample questions

Section III (60%)
Reading

16% Part A: Discrete sentences (vocabulary and structure)

Each incomplete statement is followed by four suggested completions. Select the one that is best in each case by clicking on the corresponding oval.
Try sample questions

20% Part B: Short cloze passages (vocabulary and structure)

In each paragraph, there are blanks indicating that words or phrases have been omitted. When a blank is shaded, four completions are provided. First, read through the entire paragraph. Then, for each blank, choose the best completion, given the context for the entire paragraph.
Try sample questions

24% Part C: Reading passages and authentic stimulus materials (reading comprehension)

Each selection is followed by one or more questions, incomplete statements, or commands. For each question or incomplete statement, select the best answer or completion. For each command, click the appropriate area of the screen according to the directions given.


Take this exam for FREE when you complete the FREE online CLEP Spanish course through Modern States.


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Posted in Breaking News, CLEP

BREAKING NEWS: Half the CLEP Exams were just revised

Big news-  we just saw a MAJOR revision of half of the ENTIRE CLEP CATALOG.  16 of their exams set to expire November 30, 2018, just appeared in the ACE catalog as revised and updated!!  Only after we start hearing back from parents will we have a better idea of “how” these changes impact content.  Please share in your CLEP communities immediately.

UPDATE:  This post outlines the specific changes within specific exams.


American Government 7/1/01- 11/30/18 –> REVISED EXAM  12/01/2018 -11/30/23

Calculus 10/1/12 – 11/30/18  –> REVISED EXAM 12/01/2018 -11/30/23

Chemistry 7/1/01- 11/30/18  –> REVISED EXAM 12/1/2018 – 11/30/2023

College Composition (essay) 7/1/10 – 11/30/18 –> REVISED EXAM 12/1/2018 – 11/30/2023

College Modular (no essay) 3/1/15 – 11/30/ 18 –>REVISED EXAM 12/1/2018 – 11/30/2023

English Literature 3/1/15 – 11/30/18  –> REVISED EXAM 12/1/2018 – 11/30/2023

French Language 3/1/15 – 11/30/18–> REVISED EXAM 12/1/2018 – 11/30/2023

History of the United States I 7/1/01- 11/30/18 –> REVISED EXAM 12/1/2018 – 11/30/2023

History of the United States II 7/1/01- 11/30/18 –> REVISED 12/1/2018 – 11/30/2023

Human Growth and Development 11/1/06 – 11/30/18  –>  REVISED 12/1/2018 – 11/30/2023

Humanities 3/1/15 – 11/30/18 –> REVISED 12/1/2018 – 11/30/2023

Intro. Educational Psychology 10/1/12 – 11/30/18 –> REVISED 12/1/2018 – 11/30/2023

Intro. Business Law 5/1/02 – 11/30/18 –> REVISED 12/1/2018 – 11/30/2023

Intro. Psychology 10/1/12 – 11/30/18 –> REVISED 12/1/2018 – 11/30/2023

Intro. Sociology 10/1/12 – 11/30/18 –> REVISED 12/1/2018 – 11/30/2023

Natural Sciences 7/1/01- 11/30/18 –> REVISED 12/1/2018 – 11/30/2023


ACE is the third-party review organization that colleges use to decide if a class or exam is “worth” college credit or not.  In other words, CLEP exams are worth college credit because they have undergone review by ACE.

When ACE reviews an exam, they always assign a date range for that review.  At the ending date, the exam must be reviewed again or removed.  The exam can be renewed and extended when there isn’t a significant change in content.  As an example, we’ve watched the Biology exam renew since 2001.  As such, we can feel confident that the exam has not changed that much since 2001 because the date simply keeps getting extended for another 3-year cycle.  (indicating no change)

If an exam is revised, it must be assigned a new date range.  For instance, United States History 1 has remained unchanged since 2001, but just received a new date range renewal  “12/1/2018 – 11/30/2023” which tells us that the exam was revised this time. (indicating significant content change)

It’s an imperfect system, but one that we can use to watch what the College Board is doing behind the scenes.  They don’t usually announce exam revisions, but we can figure it out if we watch the dates in the ACE database.

Some exam revisions are significant (when Social Science and History completely changed their content in 2016) or slight.  We don’t know what is coming, but we can report what we learn as a group.  This kind of feedback loop helps all parents help each other.

All date ranges and the history of date ranges are available by searching the ACE Database.

Currently, 33 exams are evaluated for college credit.  


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Posted in MOOCs

Philosophy & Ethics Courses

This post was inspired by our member Sandra, who sent me one *heck* of an amazing list of free philosophy and ethics courses!  So, naturally, I went to work finding ways to turn this list into something we all want:  college credit!  Thanks, Sandra!

This list falls into the category on my 30 ways to earn college credit list as a MOOC.  A MOOC is a source of free learning – books, classes, audio lessons, videos, etc.  To understand the principle of a MOOC, think of it like a giant library.  The content is there, and what you choose to do with it is up to you.  Some MOOCs are great, some are good, and some are bad – but all are free and available for you to consider for your homeschool.

Most colleges require at least 1 course in philosophy or ethics 

College Credit in Philosophy & Ethics

If your teen has access to dual enrollment, that’s one sure-fire way of earning high school and college credit in philosophy or ethics.  For those that want a credit by exam option (study on your own, then take 1 test) this is harder subject to find than most.  Unlike most college subjects, you can’t test out of philosophy or ethics using CLEP and AP, but there are other options!  The following break-down allows you to study independently (using the list of free resources at the bottom), and then take the correct test for college credit.

  • Saylor Academy has 2 exams:
    • Introduction to Western Political Thought (3 lower level credits)
    • Moral and Political Philosophy (3 lower level credits).
    • Note:  Saylor Academy provides course content, but you are not required to complete it prior to attempting an exam.  Each exam is free if taken through local proctor, $25 if taken online.
  • UExcel offers 3 exams:
    • Bioethics: Philosophical Issues (3 upper-level credits)
    • Business Ethics (3 upper-level credits)
    • Ethics: Theory & Practice (3 upper-level credits)
  • DSST offers 2 exams:
    • Ethics in America (3 lower level credits)
    • Business Ethics and Society (3 lower level credits)

High School Credit in Philosophy and Ethics

Generally, the parent determines the composition and length of any homeschool course, so if you’d like to build a simple elective for a half-credit or a full robust intensive course for a full-credit, the choice is yours.  If you follow the model used by rigorous high school Advanced Placement courses, your student would study the content fully over the course of the school year (roughly 120 hours of learning) and would conclude the semester with a college-credit eligible exam.  That model works well with any of the exams given above.


Free Philosophy and Ethics Courses

(source:  Open Culture)