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TEEX Cybersecurity is Back

Texas A&M Engineering Extension Service (TEEX) offers ACE-approved courses recommended for 1-2 credits each. These are DHS/FEMA funded and therefore free for the general public to take.

Around Christmas, we “lost” access to these credits when their ACE evaluation expired. (ACE is the third party approval process that decides if/when non-college courses are worth college credit)  I’m happy to report that TEEX Cybersecurity courses are back, and they’re worth more college credit than before!

Previously, we could earn 6 college credits for completing their 10-course sequence.  Now, under the new revision, you can earn 11 college credits – one of them is even upper level!!

Note:  anyone can take a TEEX course- there is no age restriction, testing requirement, or GPA needed.  Courses are pass/fail and you’ll have to add their credit to your teen’s ACE transcript.  Later, when they apply to college, you’ll send their ACE transcript (with all their ACE courses- including TEEX) to their college for evaluation.

If you’re unfamiliar with ACE and what it’s all about, this will get you started:  Understanding ACE Credit  (#7-18)

TEEX mini-courses are now all worth college credit individually!  This means you can complete as many or as few of the mini-courses, and submit each one for college credit- you choose!

Here’s the snag- you have to choose between the umbrella courses (old way) or the individual courses (new way) because you can’t do both…but they still offer both, making it seem like there are more options than there are.    If you choose the old way, you’ll walk away with 10 lower level college credits, but if you do it the new way, you’ll walk away with 11 college credits, and one of them is upper level,  for the EXACT SAME amount of work.   Choose the new way!

I’m pretty sure TEEX made a mistake by creating routes through the same courses that end up with different totals, but until they work that out on their end, I’m going to make sure you get the most credit available on your end, so be sure you choose the (New Way) options below and you’ll get the MOST CREDIT when you complete all 10 courses!

  • (Old Way)  Cyber 101 – Cybersecurity for Everyone  before 12/18 worth 2 lower level (LL) college credits, after 12/18 worth 4 LL college credits when you complete all 3:
    • AWR168 Cyber Law and White Collar Crime
    • AWR174 Cyber Ethics
    • AWR175 Information Security for Everyone
  • (New Way) up to 5 credits when taken individually
    • AWR168 Cyber Law and White Collar Crime, 2 LL credits
    • AWR174 Cyber Ethics, 2 LL credits
    • AWR175 Information Security for Everyone, 1 LL credit

 

  • (Old Way) Cyber 201 – Cybersecurity for IT Professionals  before 12/18 worth 2 lower level (LL) college credits, after 12/18 worth 3 LL college credits when you complete all 4:
    • AWR138 Network Assurance
    • AWR139 Digital Forensics Basics
    • AWR173 Information Security Basics
    • AWR178 Secure Software
  • (New Way) up to 3 credits when taken individually
    • AWR138 Network Assurance  ***and*** AWR139 Digital Forensics Basics, 1 LL credit
    • AWR173 Information Security Basics, 1 LL credit
    • AWR178 Secure Software, 1 LL credit

 

  • (Old Way) Cyber 301 – Cybersecurity for Business Professionals before 12/18 worth 2 lower level (LL) college credits, after 12/18 worth 3 LL college credits when you complete all 3:
    • AWR169 Cyber Incident Analysis and Response
    • AWR176 Disaster Recovery for Information Systems
    • AWR177 Information Risk Management
  • (New Way)  up to 2 LL and 1 UL credits when taken individually
    • AWR169 Cyber Incident Analysis and Response, 1 LL credit
    • AWR176 Disaster Recovery for Information Systems, 1 LL credit
    • AWR177 Information Risk Management, 1 UL credit

To signup, use the following link and make sure you complete each mini-class in each main class before submitting to ACE.   TEEX

After you are enrolled, use this login URL to take the classes: https://my.teex.org

Course consists of reading long modules and taking many quizzes.  Approximate time needed to complete EACH mini course:  1 day-3 days.

Sources of Free College Credits

BONUS:  currently, the Modern States Online Test Prep Program is offering a voucher to anyone who completes their online CLEP or AP prep course.  The voucher will pay for your exam cost and reimburse you for your testing center fee if you have one.  You can take an UNLIMITED number of CLEP and AP exams right now for $0.  When this voucher program ends, or if you don’t use a voucher, AP and CLEP exams cost about $100  each.


 

Besides the current CLEP/AP promo- there are classes that are $0 and award college credit.  This fantastic list was put together by a couple of members of the InstantCert forum community.  I encourage you to visit the forum if you’re considering distance learning boy1colleges for your teen- it’s the single best resource on the web.

As a homeschooler of high school students, here’s what you should know before you read on:

ALL (but one) of these freebies awards ACE credit.  As such, their transfer is very limited.  If your teen is several years away from high school graduation and selecting a target college, you may want to use these just for fun, and if he gets credit later- that’s a bonus.  You can bundle these together into high school electives too.  But, if you’re getting close to enrollment or you’ve already selected a target college, you’ll want to confirm that they accept ACE credit before investing too much time in these.

That said, since they are free, many parents have their teens complete some anyway.

See my previous posts on colleges that accept ACE courses for college credit and setting up your teen’s ACE account.

Understanding expiration dates:  whenever a course or exam is evaluated for college credit by ACE, they set a date range of usually a few years.  During that time, completing the course or exam allows you to earn college credit.  When a course or exam has “expired” that means the window for college credit has closed.  Frequently, a course or exam is renewed, and the dates will extend out another few years, but occasionally we have seen courses permanently expire.  AS LONG AS you complete a course and get it onto your ACE transcript before an expiration date, the credit is good and you can use it at any point in the future.

I keep a close eye on expiration dates- you’ll see this page updated accordingly.


TEEX Cybersecurity (11 college credits) 

Texas A&M Engineering Extension Service (TEEX) offers ACE-approved courses recommended for 1-2 credits each. These are DHS/FEMA funded and therefore free for the general public to take.  

NOTE:  if you’ve used TEEX courses prior to 12/2018, you’re going to notice a change in their credit assignment options.   In the past, TEEX offered 3 courses Cyber101, 201, and 301 – each worth 2 college credits (6 total) but to earn the credit you had to complete all of the individual “mini-courses” which weren’t worth anything by themselves.  They still offer that option, and it’s now worth 10 credits instead of 6, so that’s better, but wait, there’s a better way!  

TEEX mini-courses are now all worth college credit individually!  This means you can complete as many or as few of the mini-courses, and submit each one for college credit- you choose! 

Here’s the snag- you have to choose between the umbrella courses (old way) or the individual courses (new way) because you can’t do both…but they still offer both, making it seem like there are more options than there are.    If you choose the old way, you’ll walk away with 10 lower level college credits, but if you do it the new way, you’ll walk away with 11 college credits, and one of them is upper level,  for the EXACT SAME amount of work.   Choose the new way!

I’m pretty sure TEEX made a mistake by creating routes through the same courses that end up with different totals, but until they work that out on their end, I’m going to make sure you get the best credit available on your end, so be sure you choose the (New Way) options below and you’ll get the MOST CREDIT when you complete all 10 courses!

  • (Old Way)  Cyber 101 – Cybersecurity for Everyone  before 12/18 worth 2 lower level (LL) college credits, after 12/18 worth 4 LL college credits when you complete all 3:
    • AWR168 Cyber Law and White Collar Crime
    • AWR174 Cyber Ethics
    • AWR175 Information Security for Everyone
  • (New Way) up to 5 credits when taken individually
    • AWR168 Cyber Law and White Collar Crime, 2 LL credits
    • AWR174 Cyber Ethics, 2 LL credits 
    • AWR175 Information Security for Everyone, 1 LL credit 

 

  • (Old Way) Cyber 201 – Cybersecurity for IT Professionals  before 12/18 worth 2 lower level (LL) college credits, after 12/18 worth 3 LL college credits when you complete all 4:
    • AWR138 Network Assurance
    • AWR139 Digital Forensics Basics
    • AWR173 Information Security Basics
    • AWR178 Secure Software
  • (New Way) up to 3 credits when taken individually
    • AWR138 Network Assurance  ***and*** AWR139 Digital Forensics Basics, 1 LL credit
    • AWR173 Information Security Basics, 1 LL credit
    • AWR178 Secure Software, 1 LL credit

 

  • (Old Way) Cyber 301 – Cybersecurity for Business Professionals before 12/18 worth 2 lower level (LL) college credits, after 12/18 worth 3 LL college credits when you complete all 3:
    • AWR169 Cyber Incident Analysis and Response
    • AWR176 Disaster Recovery for Information Systems
    • AWR177 Information Risk Management
  • (New Way)  up to 2 LL and 1 UL credits when taken individually
    • AWR169 Cyber Incident Analysis and Response, 1 LL credit
    • AWR176 Disaster Recovery for Information Systems, 1 LL credit
    • AWR177 Information Risk Management, 1 UL credit

To signup, use the following link and make sure you complete each mini-class in each main class before submitting to ACE.   https://teex.org/Pages/Program.aspx?catID=607 

After you are enrolled, use this login URL to take the classes: https://my.teex.org

Course consists of reading long modules and taking many quizzes.  Approximate time needed to complete EACH mini course:  1 day-3 days.


Saylor Academy (over 100 college credits)

Saylor is 100% free if you can find a local proctor to administer your final exam. If you have to use Saylor’s online proctoring service, the cost is $25 per course.

More about Saylor Academy

Courses consist of optional reading modules and links to videos and a final exam (proctored).  Approximate time needed to complete the course: NA


Sophia – (2 college credits)

Sophia offers a number of paid ACE-approved courses that are fairly expensive. team2However, they do offer 2 free 1 credit courses:

  • Developing Effective Teams (1 credit)
  • Essentials of Managing Conflict (1 credit)

You can sign up for the courses at Sophia.org

The courses consist of video-based modules and short quizzes followed by an online exam.  Approximate time needed to complete one course and exam:  less than 1 day


FEMA Independent Study (over 40 college credits)

  • NOTE: FEMA is NOT ACE evaluated for credit.  As such, FEMA IS courses are only acceptable as transfer credit at Charter Oak State College and two other small 2-year colleges.  IF you’re planning to attend COSC, you can still apply some FEMA courses to your degree, but COSC hasn’t set an official limit – at least not one that they’re sharing with the public. I’m hearing between 3 and 9.  Cost:  $0 

The Federal Emergency Management Agency operates an online Independent Study program offering approximately 197 courses online for free. Anyone can take FEMA courses for high school credit or for fun, but only the following courses are approved for college credit:

The current list of  FEMA courses worth college credit can be found here.

The courses consist of reading modules followed by an online exam.  Approximate time needed to complete each course and exam:  1 day


The Institutes (2 college credits)

The American Institute For Chartered Property Casualty Underwriters (commonly referred to as “The Institutes”) offer a free ethics course that is ACE recommended for 2 credits. (deadline to participate 3/31/2019)

Course consists of reading modules followed by an online exam.  Approximate time needed to complete the course and exam:  less than 1 day

312N-H Ethics and the CPCU Code of Professional Conduct (2 credits) – an upper-level ethics/philosophy course that meets TESU’s General Education “ethics” requirement. (it meets 2 of the 3 credit requirement – you might have to ask for an exception to be made for the last credit, but typically this is automatically granted. The 3rd credit can be made up as a general ed elective).
To signup, use the following link: http://www.theinstitutes.org/comet/learning_modules/cpcu_ethics.htm

Select the FREE option. You should not do the $5 option. The paid option is for “Continuing Education credit,” which is different than college credit. The free version is ACE approved for college credit.


WATCH LIST

Courses under this line have been worth college credit in the past but are currently not worth college credit.  These courses are still available to take, but beware that if you take them while they are expired, you will NOT receive college credit.  If any of these courses are renewed, I’ll update it asap.


National Fire Academy (1 college credit) 

  • Q0118 Self-Study Course for Community Safety Educators  (1 credit)

The National Emergency Training Center/National Fire Academy (NFA) offers one free course that is ACE-recommended for 1 credit. To signup, use the following link and find Q0118 on the list: National Fire Academy Course List

After you are enrolled, use this login URL to take the classes: NFA Login


 


 

Take a CLEP for free!

Taking a CLEP Exam Using Modern States –

STEP by STEP instructions

image 3

Modern States offers free, online classes to help you prepare for CLEP exams. When you complete a course through Modern States you will receive a free voucher for the exam.

Here are the steps:

  1. Create an account at www.modernstates.org .
  2. Choose a class from the Modern States catalog.
  3. Enroll and complete the course. View the videos (or read the transcripts) and answer all of the practice questions. You can view your progress in the class by choosing the progress tab at the top of the screen.image 1
  4. Request a voucher when you’ve completed 100% of the course. You will need to upload a screenshot of your course progress. It will look like the image above, but the total at the right needs to be 100%. You should receive an email from Modern States with the voucher code within a few days.
  5. Register for the CLEP exam using the voucher number you received. Add the voucher number at the checkout (see the image below). Your total will be $0. Print the CLEP Exam Registration Ticket. Bring this to the testing center.image 2
  6. Make an appointment at your local testing center to take the exam. Your Exam Registration Ticket expires six months from the date your order it. You can take the exam any time before it expires.
  7. Take the CLEP exam. You will need to bring the Exam Registration Ticket, a valid ID, and money for the test center fee. (Make sure that you get a receipt for the test center fee! My test center receipt always lists the wrong test -the Accuplacer- but it has always been accepted by Modern States.)
  8. Submit a reimbursement request for the test center fee. You will need to attach a copy of your score report and the test center fee receipt in addition to providing the CLEP voucher number you received in step 4.

The voucher is received from Modern States after completing their course and is used to purchase a CLEP Exam Registration Ticket from the College Board.

The CLEP Exam Registration Ticket is presented at the testing center and allows you to take the CLEP exam.


 

CLEP can really save you thousands of dollars, and you can use it anywhere CLEP is accepted (about half the colleges in the country accept CLEP). 

Thinking about using CLEP?  Learn more, read this!

Southern New Hampshire University

Homeschooling for College Credit at Southern New Hampshire University (online)

Listen to a brief introduction to this cost map:


Rack Rate Tuition: $19,200 ($320 per credit x 60 credits)

Resourcefully Planned: $5,125 (45 credits in homeschool at about $325,  15 cr. taken through SNHU online once enrolled)


Degree:  Associate of Arts

Note:  Southern New Hampshire University requires 25% of the degree (15 cr.) to be earned through SNHU online, thus 75% of the degree (45 cr.) can be completed during or after homeschool and transferred in before starting classes with SNHU.  Students who do that will save the most money and begin their studies at SNHU Online with 1 semester remaining.

What is a resourcefully planned degree?  In short, a cost map shows you how Homeschooling for College Credit in high school can be transferred into a specific college to save money.  We’ll use alternative college credit sources that are accepted by this college to devise a strategic plan for your student.  The cost map is a general outline that gets you headed in the right direction.

What a Resourcefully Planned Cost Map is NOT:  It’s not a guarantee.  This is an informed DIY plan using the college’s advertised transfer and credit acceptance policies.

Why DIY?  As the parent of a high school student, you won’t have access to academic advisors or the registrar of a college, in addition, colleges don’t specialize in helping you avoid taking their classes!  But, college transfer protocol and transfer policies are often available to the public, allowing teens to start earning college credit NOW that can be used LATER.

Where is Dual Enrollment?  Since some families have free tuition through dual enrollment, while other families may not, dual enrollment has been completely left out of the plan. If you have dual enrollment available to you, you may want to use it.

NOTE: Southern New Hampshire University offers VERY AFFORDABLE dual enrollment high school program ($100 per course – not per credit!) however it is currently limited to those who can commute to take the classes in person at the New Hampshire campus.  If you are a LOCAL STUDENT, the 5 courses that “count” toward the degree can all be completed through their dual enrollment program, which changes the cost of those classes from $960 to only $100.  Resourcefully Planned LOCAL STUDENT:  $825 

Other costs:  Colleges will have other costs beyond the scope of our basic tuition calculation.  Application fee, graduation fee, technology fee, etc. are all fees that you should plan for when your teen eventually enrolls.  To keep the playing field even, the rack rate listed above doesn’t include fees either – the numbers shown are straight tuition.

Saylor Academy has a partnership with SNHU that guarantees credit transfer.  Read more about how to homeschool for college credit using Saylor Academy here.

Additionally, SNHU policy allows acceptance of credit that is ACE or NCCRS evaluated for college credit.  Read more about ACE and NCCRS credit you can take here.


Rack Rate Tuition:  $19,200

Resourcefully Planned:  $5,125

$325 would be paid throughout high school for the first 45 credits (cash). 

The remaining  15 credits will cost $4,800 at SNHU. (apply for scholarships)


How to avoid student loan debt

  1. Reduce the number of credits your teen must complete by doing as many of them as possible in high school.
  2. Secure scholarships, apply for Federal work-study and use savings/cash to cover the balance of tuition once you’re an enrolled student.
  3. Only after you’ve exhausted options 1 & 2 should you consider borrowing money.

Cost Map for Southern New Hampshire University   (01/2019)

Requirement Homeschooling for College Credit Approximate Cost taken during homeschool

$325

Cost if taken through SNHU

$19,200

English 1, 3 cr. CLEP College Composition  Modular (no essay) $0* $960
English 2, 3 cr. NA NA $960
Math, 3 cr. CLEP College Mathematics (MAT130)

 

$0* $960
Perspectives in Liberal Arts, 3 cr. NA NA $960
Success Strategies for online learning, 3 cr. NA NA $960
Humanities, 3 cr. Saylor Academy ENVS203 Environmental Ethics, Justice & World Views $25** $960
Humanities, 3 cr. NA NA $960
History 100, 3 cr. CLEP U.S. History 1 $0 $960
History 200, 3 cr. DSST Civil War & Reconstruction $100 $960
Natural Science 200, 3 cr. NA NA $960
Natural Science 100, 3 cr. CLEP Natural Sciences $0* $960
Humanities 200, 3 cr. DSST Art of the Western World $100 $960
Public Speaking, 3 cr. DSST Public Speaking $100 $960
Free Elective: CLEP American Government $0* $960
Free Elective: CLEP Analyzing Interpreting Literature $0* $960
Free Elective: CLEP Introduction Sociology $0* $960
Free Elective:

 

TEEX Cybersecurity, 6 cr.

 

$0

$325

$1920

$19,200

*Modern States is currently awarding vouchers to cover CLEP and AP exam fees as well as testing center fees.  You can obtain a free voucher through their website. 
**Saylor Academy allows for local proctoring $0 or digital proctoring $25.  This plan is calculated using digital proctoring, but you may deduct $25 per course if you choose local proctoring.


Important links for Southern New Hampshire University:

Saylor Academy Partnership Page

Southern New Hampshire University Dual Enrollment (on campus only)

Southern New Hampshire University CLEP Exam Equivalencies use COCE column

SNHU Transfer Policy

 

Need help from scratch?   Start here –> Homeschooling for College Credit

Want to know more about the types of college credit used in this chart? –>  Take me there.

See more Cost Maps

 

University of North Carolina-Pembroke

Homeschooling for College Credit at University of North Carolina Pembroke

Listen to a brief introduction to this cost map:


Rack Rate Tuition IN STATE: $6,360 ($53 per credit x 120 credits)

Resourcefully Planned IN STATE: $4,611 (33 credits in homeschool $0,  87 credits taken online with UNC)

Resourcefully Planned with Career and College Promise: $2,000 (60 credits in homeschool, 4 semesters online with UNC)

-or-

Rack Rate Tuition OUT OF STATE: $22,560 ($188 per credit x 120 credits)

Resourcefully Planned OUT OF STATE: $16,365 (33 credits in homeschool $0,  87 credits taken online with UNC)


Degree:  Bachelor of Arts, Criminal Justice  or Bachelor of Arts, Sociology

Note:  UNC Pembroke is one of three NC Promise colleges in North Carolina.  Promise schools offer flat-rate tuition ($500 per semester in-state, $2,500 per semester out of state).  Read more about the NC Promise program here.   


What is a resourcefully planned degree?  In short, a cost map shows you how Homeschooling for College Credit in high school can be transferred into a specific college to save money.  We’ll use alternative college credit sources that are accepted by this college to devise a strategic plan for your student.  The cost map is a general outline that gets you headed in the right direction.

What a Resourcefully Planned Cost Map is NOT:  It’s not a guarantee.  This is an informed DIY plan using the college’s advertised transfer and credit acceptance policies.

Why DIY?  As the parent of a high school student, you won’t have access to academic advisors or the registrar of a college, in addition, colleges don’t specialize in helping you avoid taking their classes!  But, college transfer protocol and transfer policies are often available to the public, allowing teens to start earning college credit NOW that can be used LATER.

Where is Dual Enrollment?  Since some families have free tuition through dual enrollment, while other families may not, dual enrollment has been completely left out of the plan. If you have dual enrollment available to you, you may want to use it.

Note:  North Carolina homeschool high school students can participate in the Career and College Promise through their local community college from grades 11 and 12. This program allows teens to take guaranteed transfer courses on the AA or AS pathways tuition-free.  In addition, there is a Criminal Justice pathway that allows 12 credits (4 courses) that would also apply to the CJ degree. If you are an NC resident, I strongly urge you to consider using Career and College Promise (dual enrollment).  If your teen can not hit the testing benchmark to begin the AA or AS pathway, follow this plan making use of CLEP exams instead.  Once your teen has graduated from high school, simply complete the AA or AS before you transfer.   The CLEP policy of UNC-P may differ from that of your local community college.  UNC-P allows up to 30 CLEP credits.

Read more here:  $2000 Bachelor’s Degrees in NC

Other costs:  Colleges will have other costs beyond the scope of our basic tuition calculation.  Application fee, graduation fee, technology fee, etc. are all fees that you should plan for when your teen eventually enrolls.  To keep the playing field even, the rack rate listed above doesn’t include fees either – the numbers shown are straight tuition.


Rack Rate Tuition IN STATE: $6,360 ($53 per credit x 120 credits)

Rack Rate Tuition OUT OF STATE: $22,560 ($188 per credit x 120 credits)

Resourcefully Planned IN STATE: $4,611 

Resourcefully Planned OUT OF STATE: $16,365


How to avoid student loan debt

  1. Reduce the number of credits your teen must complete by doing as many of them as possible in high school.
  2. Secure scholarships, apply for Federal work-study and use savings/cash to cover the balance of tuition once you’re an enrolled student.
  3. Only after you’ve exhausted options 1 & 2 should you consider borrowing money.

Cost Map for University of North Carolina Pembroke (01/2019)

Requirement Homeschooling for College Credit Approximate Cost taken during homeschool Cost when taken through UNC in state Cost when taken through UNC out of state
English Composition 1, 3 cr. CLEP College Composition (with essay), ENG1050, 3 cr. $0* $159 $564
ENG1060 English Composition 2 NA NA $159 $564
Fine Arts, 3 cr. CLEP Humanities, ART 2050 and MUS 1020, 6 cr. (+3 credit elective) $0* $318 $1,128
Literature, 3 cr. CLEP Analyzing and Interpreting Literature, ENG2030, 3 cr. $0* $159 $564
Philosophy or Religion, 3 cr. NA NA $159 $564
History, 3 cr. CLEP U.S. History 1, HST1010, 3 cr. $0* $159 $564
Social Science, Psychology, 3 cr. CLEP Psychology, PSY1010, 3 cr. $0* $159 $564
Social Science, Sociology, 3 cr. CLEP Sociology, SOC1010, 3 cr. $0* $159 $564
Social Science, Political Science, 3 cr. AP Government and Politics, PLS1010, 3 cr. $0* $159 $564
Natural Sciences, 6 cr. CLEP Natural Sciences, BIO 1000 and PHS 1100, 6 cr. $0* $318 $1,128
Mathematics CLEP College Math, MAT1050, 3 cr. $0* $159 $564
General Ed. Elective, 6 cr. 3 credit overage from Fine Arts, need more 3 cr. NA $159 $564
Freshman Seminar, 1 cr. NA NA $53 $188
Physical Education, 2 cr. NA NA $106 $376
Criminal Justice Core or Sociology major, 18-21 cr. NA NA $1,113 $3,948
Criminal Justice or Sociology Electives, 15 cr. NA (Career and College Promise eligible) NA / $0 $795 $2,820
University Electives, 39 -42 cr. NA (Career and College Promise eligible) NA / $0 $2,067 $7,332
         
      $6,360 $22,560

*Modern States is currently awarding vouchers to cover CLEP and AP exam fees as well as testing center fees.  You can obtain a free voucher through their website. 


Important links for University of North Carolina:

List of all NC degrees across all NC universities

UNC Tuition and Fees

UNC General Education Requirements

Accepted CLEP and AP exams

Need help from scratch?   Start here –> Homeschooling for College Credit

Want to know more about the types of college credit used in this chart? –>  Take me there.

See more Cost Maps

Colorado Technical University

Homeschooling for College Credit at Colorado Technical University (Online)

Listen to a brief introduction to this cost map:


This college uses QUARTER credits

Semester credits are worth 1.5 times more than quarter credits. Thus, a 120-credit-hour bachelor degree under the conventional system is equal to a 180-credit-hour degree under the quarter credit system.


Rack Rate Tuition: $58,500 ($325 per credit x 180 credits)

Resourcefully Planned: $39,713 (61.5 credits in homeschool at about $1,200,  118.5 cr. taken through Colorado Tech online once enrolled)


Degree:  Bachelor of Science, Cybersecurity  

Note:  Colorado Technical University requires 25% of the degree to be earned through Colorado Tech University online, however, it is not possible to complete all of the other specific courses required in advance.

Since CTU does not publish a “list” that matches CLEP exams with their courses, I spoke at length with their registrar to get a handle on their policy.  Per my conversation (nothing in writing) they assured me that general education courses were interchangeable within the same category (ex. their “Introduction to Science” could be replaced with Biology or their “Modern American History” could be replaced with any other history, etc.)  

Since I rarely trust what’s spoken, I approached this cost map from an extremely conservative position. It is possible that you can use more transfer than I worked in, but this is one of those schools that makes it harder than it has to be.  

What is a resourcefully planned degree?  In short, a cost map shows you how Homeschooling for College Credit in high school can be transferred into a specific college to save money.  We’ll use alternative college credit sources that are accepted by this college to devise a strategic plan for your student.  The cost map is a general outline that gets you headed in the right direction.

What a Resourcefully Planned Cost Map is NOT:  It’s not a guarantee.  This is an informed DIY plan using the college’s advertised transfer and credit acceptance policies.

Why DIY?  As the parent of a high school student, you won’t have access to academic advisors or the registrar of a college, in addition, colleges don’t specialize in helping you avoid taking their classes!  But, college transfer protocol and transfer policies are often available to the public, allowing teens to start earning college credit NOW that can be used LATER.

Where is Dual Enrollment?  Since some families have free tuition through dual enrollment, while other families may not, dual enrollment has been completely left out of the plan. If you have dual enrollment available to you, you may want to use it.

Other costs:  Colleges will have other costs beyond the scope of our basic tuition calculation.  Application fee, graduation fee, technology fee, etc. are all fees that you should plan for when your teen eventually enrolls.  To keep the playing field even, the rack rate listed above doesn’t include fees either – the numbers shown are straight tuition.


Rack Rate Tuition:  $58,500

Resourcefully Planned:  $39,713

$1,200 would be paid throughout high school for the first 61.5 credits (cash). 

The remaining  118.5 credits will cost $38,513 at Colorado Tech. (apply for scholarships)

Savings of $18,787


How to avoid student loan debt

  1. Reduce the number of credits your teen must complete by doing as many of them as possible in high school.
  2. Secure scholarships, apply for Federal work-study and use savings/cash to cover the balance of tuition once you’re an enrolled student.
  3. Only after you’ve exhausted options 1 & 2 should you consider borrowing money.

Cost Map for Colorado Technical University  (01/2018)

Requirement Homeschooling for College Credit Approximate Cost when taken during homeschool Cost when taken through  CTU
Cybersecurity Core, 52 cr. NA NA $16,900
Cybersecurity Concentration, 64 cr. NA NA $20,800
Spreadsheet Applications, 4 cr. NA NA $1,300
Discrete Mathematics and Statistics, 4.5 cr. NA NA $1,463
Technical Writing DSST Exam Technical Writing $100 $1,463
Principles of Macroeconomics CLEP Principles of Macroeconomics $0* $1,463
English 104 & 105 CLEP College Composition (with essay) $0* $2,925
Introduction to Algebra CLEP College Mathematics $0* $1,463
College Algebra CLEP College Algebra $0* $1,463
History 101 Straighterline U.S. History 1 $100** $1,463
Math 301 Straighterline Business Stats. $100** $1,463
Philosophy 101 Straighterline Business Ethics $100** $1,463
Political Science 101 Straighterline American Govt. $100** $1,463
Science with Lab Straighterline Biology with Lab (any lab science) $300** $1,950
Science with Lab Straighterline Chemistry with Lab (any lab science) $300** $1,950
University 104 Academic Success Straighterline Student Success 101 $100** $1,463
$1,200 $58,500

 

*Modern States is currently awarding vouchers to cover CLEP and AP exam fees as well as testing center fees.  You can obtain a free voucher through their website. 

**Colorado Technical University has a partnership with Straighterline that guarantees transfer of these specific courses.  See full transfer agreement list here.   It’s worth noting that they require a slightly higher score (73%) than normal (70%) to qualify for the credit.


Important links for Colorado Technical University:

CTU Tuition Page

College Catalog

CLEP Policy (max: 30 credits / 45 quarter credits)

Articulation agreements with this college

Colorado Technical University under scrutiny 

Need help from scratch?   Start here –> Homeschooling for College Credit

Want to know more about the types of college credit used in this chart? –>  Take me there.

See more Cost Maps

 

Math Success 4 Math Averse

So, if you already feel yourself mounting a reaction to the title… this post isn’t for you.  Like anything you’re good at, you can’t imagine that other people can’t “become” good at it too… if they only had a better attitude, different curriculum, a better teacher, etc.  STEM fields (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) are all the rage – most universities have watched their STEM-majors double in the past few years, so there is a ton of emphasis on not only high school math, but college-level math in high school.  Sure, with 10,000 hours it’s possible to become an expert in anything.  This is not that.

You’ve heard me tell you that YOU are the best guidance counselor for your teen.  That extends beyond math, obviously, but I’m not going to tell you whether I think it’s right or wrong to push your non-mathy teens into Calculus, that’s for you to decide.  In this post, we’re going to embrace the possibility that some of our teens don’t enjoy math – have no interest in STEM – want to study as little math as possible, and certainly, don’t want a career that requires a lot of math.  It is possible to lead a happy, healthy, educated life without loving math.  That is this.

High School Math

How much is required?  First, you have to answer that question for your state.  If you live in a state with specific high school graduation requirements, then you’ll want to be sure you comply with them.  Compliance assures your teen’s diploma will be valid and legal as they exit high school and move forward in life.  State Requirements Look-Up  Everything that follows in this post assumes you’re making decisions within the framework of homeschooling lawfully.  The truth of the matter is that most of you don’t have graduation requirements, rather your state offers up their public school math program as a suggested course for you to follow. Compliance with public school suggestions are always up to you.

What subjects count?  Let’s assume your state lets you choose your curriculum, in that case, you have a lot of freedom here.  We’re going to go off-book in a minute, but before we do, let’s review a typical k-12  math sequence and roughly when it’s taught:

  1. Arithmetic  (grades k-8)
  2. Pre Algebra (grades 6-9)
  3. Algebra 1 (grades 8-10)
  4. Geometry (grades 9-10)
  5. Algebra 2 (grades 10-12)
  6. Trigonometry / Pre-Calculus (grades 10-12)
  7. Calculus (grades 10-12)

The problem for some students happens around Pre- Algebra.

Algebra, in general, can be when the bottom falls out of your otherwise competent student’s success.  If you ask any adult that “isn’t good at math” where they fell apart, they’ll likely tell you it was in algebra.  If you’ve hit a rough patch in Pre-Algebra or Algebra 1, you have a few options.

  • Do more arithmetic – speed and accuracy are key.  You may be surprised how weak most teens are at arithmetic, and in my opinion, this is likely the culprit. Forget how the transcript “looks” for a minute and think big-picture:  no matter what your teen does for college or a career or in life, they need solid arithmetic skills- this is as important as knowing how to read.  If their arithmetic is weak, make it PRIORITY #1.  No exceptions.  (see my suggestions for this at the bottom)
  • Slow down the pace – assuming the rate of learning new material is the problem, rather than lacking a foundation in arithmetic, slowing down might make it more manageable.
  • Change curriculum- while I hate this suggestion, it is an option.  The problem with curriculum hopping in math, is that the scope and sequence almost never match, and you’ll be left with holes, but the issue here, is that you won’t know you have holes.
  • Change tracks- if you’re sure that arithmetic isn’t a weakness, and your teen is an otherwise fine student capable of learning new things, you do have the option of switching to applied math!  It is possible that your teen just doesn’t like math.  I can feel you gasp through my computer, but if you can wrap your head around the possibility that they might not need as much math as you’re planning, you may find one of the applied math options really hits a home run.  (more about that in a few minutes)

Math in College

Before we can talk about the alternative paths in high school math, most parents protest immediately because they fear their student won’t be able to either (a) get into college (b) do college math.  Let’s look at math in college for a moment and some of the myths.  First, the high school sequence above is actually harder (higher) than the math required for most college degrees.  This is true!  Most parents believe that math through Calculus is required for all college admission, when in fact, math through Calculus is only required for the smallest of career choices.  Let’s learn some vocab:

GENERAL EDUCATION:  the core requirements everyone at that college must take in order to graduate from that college. General Education requirements are as few as 5 classes in some Associate of Applied Science programs, to the more typical 20 courses at a 4-year college.  You’ll find that General Education requirements can be VERY different from one school to the next.

MAJOR:  the requirements beyond the General Education courses necessary to earn your degree. You get to choose your major which should align with your career goals.

Here are some truths:

  • Most non-STEM majors don’t have math requirements.  Their General Education requirement will have some type of math, but you can shop around for low math colleges.
  • General Education requirements across the board usually don’t require math above the College Algebra level (roughly equivalent to Algebra 2 with a chapter or two of Pre-Calculus for good measure).
  • Most 4-year colleges and all community colleges offer math classes for every level.   Even if you enter college unprepared for college math, the college is usually arranged to help you succeed.
  • General Education requirements in math sometimes allow science and technology to count in the same category, meaning it’s sometimes possible to avoid all math entirely by taking an extra science or computer course.
  • There are 2 places you have to check to see the type and amount of math required:
    • The college’s General Education requirement (this will be the same for everyone, so if the college requires Statistics or Trig in their General Education requirements, there is no way around this).  Look for General Education requirements that ask for no more than 3 credits of math (1 class) and with numbers as close as possible to 100.  For instance, MATH105 should be easier than MATH121.
    • Your target major at each target school.  Some majors just require a lot of math, so if you’re looking at a math-heavy major, there isn’t much I can offer.  However, math-light majors can vary from one college to another!  If your teen wants to become a History Teacher, you’ll find most colleges don’t require College Algebra- so if your target school does, keep looking.
MATH-LIGHT MATH-HEAVY
American Sign Language Interpreter

Anthropology

Art History

Automotive

Broadcasting / TV/ Radio

Communications

Construction Technology

Culinary Arts

Diversity

Dramatic Arts

Elevator Installer

Emergency Medicine / Paramedic

Fire Science

Foreign Language

Graphic Design

Hair and Beauty

Health Occupations

History

Horticulture

Hospitality

Human Services/ Social Work

Interior Design

Journalism

K-12 Teacher (non-STEM)

Lawyer / Legal

Library Science

Management

Mortuary Science

Music

Nursing

Performing Arts

Philosophy

Pilot

Police and Law Enforcement

Political Science

Psychology

Real Estate

Religion

Sales and Marketing

Sociology

Studio Art

Sustainability

Writing

Accounting

Actuary

Astronomy

Business

Chemical Engineering

Chemistry

Computer Aided Drafting

Computer Programming

Data Analysis

Economics

Electrical Engineering

Engineering (as a category)

Engineering Technology

Finance

K-12 Teacher (STEM)

Mechanical Engineering

Medical Science

Petroleum Engineering

Physics

Science Teacher

Software Development

Statistics

Supply-Chain

Video Game Design

Jennifer’s tips for students who really, really, really hate math

  1. Spend a lot of time investigating careers and college majors.  You need to know if your career goal works for those who hate math.  If you’re looking at a Math-Heavy career, you’ll have to embrace math or change career trajectories!
  2. If you’ve found a career and major that are Math-Light, start making a list of colleges with low general education math requirements.  The lowest you’ll find is usually called “Mathematics for Liberal Arts” and the lowest amount you’ll usually find is 3 credits – 1 course.  If you’re seeing general education requirements higher than this, keep looking.
  3. Be sure to look for hidden maths that sneak into a major.  Math can lurk in classes with names that contain these words in their title:
    1. Quantitative
    2. Statistics
    3. Probability
    4.  Research
    5. Financial
    6. Analysis
    7. Inference
  4. See if you can test out of the math requirement in high school using CLEP or DSST exams at your target schools.  (not all colleges will accept exam credit!)  This approach has several benefits.
    1. Study in your own homeschool without stress or pressure.
    2. Earn college credit as pass/fail, removing the worry about your GPA.
    3. Start your first semester without a math prerequisite (often you can’t register for science until you’ve finished math).
    4. Start (and finish) college without having to do a single math class.
  5. If you plan to earn your degree as a distance learning student/online, many of these programs also partner with college-credit-businesses that allow you to complete some courses at home (in high school) in a self-paced and open book setting.  These partnerships are a wonderful way to earn credit, but outside of the partnership, you may find that the credit won’t transfer.  The company with them MOST college partnerships is called Straighterline.  The lowest transferable math they offer is College Algebra, but their partnership extends to over 100 colleges, so it’s worth considering.  You can also find math options here.

CLEP Testing:  College Mathematics CLEP Exam Website

DSST Testing: Mathematics for Liberal Arts DSST Testing Website

Applied Math Courses in High School

If you’ve caught your breath, and have decided that you may not have to spend all 4 years of high school in pursuit of Calculus credit, I want to offer you some alternative math courses that you can use in place of the traditional sequence we discussed earlier.  Using applied math takes the “theory” of math, and puts it into “application” or real-world use of numbers.  For many students that struggle with math, you’ll see a huge improvement when they begin studying applied math- this happened to my 12th grader.  After struggling through 3 years of Saxon Algebra 1/2 (aka pre-algebra) with barely passing marks every year,  (yes, he did the same book 3 years in a row and it never “clicked” for him) my 12th-grade son is now a solid “A” math student in Consumer Math.  He has turned the corner, we found a way for him to be successful! I only wish I’d started him in applied math years earlier.

In most cases, you can find these books through your favorite online bookstore.

Consumer Math:  I spent months reviewing the top 4 publishers in this space, and my hands-down favorite is A Beka.  I know some of you aren’t Christian, but besides an occasional bible verse, you won’t find a strong Christian theme in this book.  The content is exceptional.  Full color, practical, easy to read, excellent explanations, manageable lesson sizes, can be done over 1 year or 2.  Note: You don’t need the half-dozen books they sell for the “complete kit” you just need the Teacher Book (answers) and Student Book.  Highly recommend. 

Culinary Math:  This is my wheelhouse.  I taught Culinary Math for 10 years at a community college early in my career.  If your student wants to be a chef, they’ll be miles ahead of their culinary school peers if they start culinary math now.  While Culinary Math is a variation on arithmetic, the terminology is a little different.  Beyond converting recipes and measurements, the student will learn to calculate food and labor costs, convert between weight and volume, and understand purchasing.  The textbook I taught from would be great for a homeschool course:  Culinary Math by Linda Blocker/Julia Hill. 

Math for Health Care Professionals:  Review of the metric system, reading drug labels, medicine cups, syringes, intravenous administration bags, dosages, basic intravenous administration, and basic dosage by weight units.

Personal Finance:  There are dozens of curriculum options since I get to plug my favorites, I love Dave Ramsey’s Foundations in Personal Finance High School course. It can be taken in person, via DVD, or online.

Introduction to Accounting / Bookkeeping:  Many homeschool curriculum companies offer complete products if you don’t see it under “math” try looking under “electives.”

Statistics:  For visual learners, Statistics might be a great fit.  Statistics use a lot of charts, graphs, and spreadsheets.  While traditional Advanced Placement students usually have to wait until after Pre-Calculus to take Statistics, that’s because they want the students to finish their core first.  Most people can study statistics with a mathematical level of around Pre-Algebra or Algebra 1.  There is a college-credit exam for students who want to take their learning to the next level.  See the DSST link above.  

Game Theory & Probability:  This will totally appeal to anyone who likes to play card games, roll dice, flip coins, or talk about sports statistics and winning the lottery.  The Great Courses has several really great full curriculum options, but I personally loved the free streaming lecture series called Against All Odds  

College Math / and or / Mathematics for Liberal Arts:  We spoke earlier about testing out of college math while still in high school.  If you’re eager to try this option, you can find out about the content of these 2 exams at the links above.  While you might be able to find a college text, you can likely build a curriculum DIY style for either of these courses.  This is a great math credit option for 11th or 12th grade. Compare the DSST Math for the Liberal Arts vs. CLEP College Mathematics

High School Math / Practical Math:  This isn’t applied math, however, it’s a perfectly acceptable math course title if you’ve decided to dedicate more time to arithmetic.  Keep in mind that your teen’s real education is more important than what appears on their transcript, so if you see gaps in their skills, ignore the criticisms and do what needs to be done.  A community college accepts all high school graduates at every level of mathematics ability.


 

Arithmetic for High School Students

Earlier, I wrote “Do more arithmetic – speed and accuracy are key.  You may be surprised how weak most teens are at arithmetic, and in my opinion, this is likely the culprit. Forget how the transcript “looks” for a minute and think big-picture:  no matter what your teen does for college or a career or in life, they need solid arithmetic skills- this is as important as knowing how to read.  If their arithmetic is weak, make it PRIORITY #1.  No exceptions.”

If this is where you need to focus, start here:  Arithmetic on Khan Academy


 

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Homeschooling for College Credit at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (online)

Listen to a brief introduction to this cost map:


Rack Rate Tuition: $49,530 ($390 per credit x 127 credits)

Resourcefully Planned: $41,340 (21 credits in homeschool at $0,  106 cr. taken through Embry-Riddle online once enrolled)


Degree:  Bachelor of Science in Engineering

Note:  Embry-Riddle has high school curriculum admissions requirements here.

What is a resourcefully planned degree?  In short, a cost map shows you how Homeschooling for College Credit in high school can be transferred into a specific college to save money.  We’ll use alternative college credit sources that are accepted by this college to devise a strategic plan for your student.  The cost map is a general outline that gets you headed in the right direction.

What a Resourcefully Planned Cost Map is NOT:  It’s not a guarantee.  This is an informed DIY plan using the college’s advertised transfer and credit acceptance policies.

Why DIY?  As the parent of a high school student, you won’t have access to academic advisors or the registrar of a college, in addition, colleges don’t specialize in helping you avoid taking their classes!  But, college transfer protocol and transfer policies are often available to the public, allowing teens to start earning college credit NOW that can be used LATER.

Where is Dual Enrollment?  Since some families have free tuition through dual enrollment, while other families may not, dual enrollment has been completely left out of the plan. If you have dual enrollment available to you, you may want to use it.

NOTE: Embry-Riddle specifically asks for an unweighted GPA.  If your teen earns dual-enrollment credit, use a standard 4.0 scale on their transcript.

Other costs:  Colleges will have other costs beyond the scope of our basic tuition calculation.  Application fee, graduation fee, technology fee, etc. are all fees that you should plan for when your teen eventually enrolls.  To keep the playing field even, the rack rate listed above doesn’t include fees either – the numbers shown are straight tuition.


Rack Rate Tuition:  $49,530

Resourcefully Planned:  $41,340

$0 spent throughout high school for the first 21 credits. 

The remaining  106 credits will cost $41,340 at ERAU. (apply for scholarships)

Saved by Homeschooling for College Credit:  $8,190


How to avoid student loan debt

  1. Reduce the number of credits your teen must complete by doing as many of them as possible in high school.
  2. Secure scholarships, apply for Federal work-study and use savings/cash to cover the balance of tuition once you’re an enrolled student.
  3. Only after you’ve exhausted options 1 & 2 should you consider borrowing money.

Cost Map for Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University   (01/2019)

Requirement Homeschooling for College Credit Approximate Cost when taken during homeschool Costs when taken through ERAU
MATH241 & MATH242, 8 cr. AP Calculus BC

Calculus & Analytical Geometry, 8 cr. (score of 4 for MATH241, score of 5 for MATH241 & 242)

$0* $3,120
PHY150. 4 cr. Physics 1 for Engineers

AP Physics C Mechanics (score of 4)

$0* $1,560
Humanities lower level elective, 3 cr. CLEP Analyzing and Interpreting Literature $0* $1,170
Humanities upper-level elective, 3 cr. CLEP English Literature $0* $1,170
Social Science lower level elective, 3 cr. CLEP U.S. History 1 $0* $1,170
Courses at ERAU NA $41,340 $41,340
    $41,340 $49,530

*Modern States is currently awarding vouchers to cover CLEP and AP exam fees as well as testing center fees.  You can obtain a free voucher through their website. 


Important links for Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University:

AP Exams accepted at ERAU

CLEP and DSST exams accepted at ERAU

Need help from scratch?   Start here –> Homeschooling for College Credit

Want to know more about the types of college credit used in this chart? –>  Take me there.

See more Cost Maps

Southern New Hampshire University

Homeschooling for College Credit at Southern New Hampshire University (online)

Listen to a brief introduction to this cost map:


Rack Rate Tuition: $38,400 ($320 per credit x 120 credits)

Resourcefully Planned: $11,160 (87 credits in homeschool at about $600,  33 cr. taken through SNHU online once enrolled)


Degree:  Bachelor of Science, Business Administration (any concentration) 

Note:  Southern New Hampshire University requires 25% of the degree to be earned through SNHU online, thus 75% of the degree can be completed during or after homeschool and transferred in before starting classes with SNHU.  Students who do that will save the most money and begin their studies at SNHU Online as a college senior.

What is a resourcefully planned degree?  In short, a cost map shows you how Homeschooling for College Credit in high school can be transferred into a specific college to save money.  We’ll use alternative college credit sources that are accepted by this college to devise a strategic plan for your student.  The cost map is a general outline that gets you headed in the right direction.

What a Resourcefully Planned Cost Map is NOT:  It’s not a guarantee.  This is an informed DIY plan using the college’s advertised transfer and credit acceptance policies.

Why DIY?  As the parent of a high school student, you won’t have access to academic advisors or the registrar of a college, in addition, colleges don’t specialize in helping you avoid taking their classes!  But, college transfer protocol and transfer policies are often available to the public, allowing teens to start earning college credit NOW that can be used LATER.

Where is Dual Enrollment?  Since some families have free tuition through dual enrollment, while other families may not, dual enrollment has been completely left out of the plan. If you have dual enrollment available to you, you may want to use it.

NOTE: Southern New Hampshire University offers VERY AFFORDABLE dual enrollment high school program ($100 per course – not per credit!) however it is currently limited to those who can commute to take the classes in person at the New Hampshire campus.  

Other costs:  Colleges will have other costs beyond the scope of our basic tuition calculation.  Application fee, graduation fee, technology fee, etc. are all fees that you should plan for when your teen eventually enrolls.  To keep the playing field even, the rack rate listed above doesn’t include fees either – the numbers shown are straight tuition.

Saylor Academy has a partnership with SNHU that guarantees credit transfer.  Read more about how to homeschool for college credit using Saylor Academy here.

Additionally, SNHU policy allows acceptance of credit that is ACE or NCCRS evaluated for college credit.  Read more about ACE and NCCRS credit you can take here.


Rack Rate Tuition:  $38,400

Resourcefully Planned:  $11,160

$600 would be paid throughout high school for the first 87 credits (cash). 

The remaining  33 credits will cost $10,560 at SNHU. (apply for scholarships)


How to avoid student loan debt

  1. Reduce the number of credits your teen must complete by doing as many of them as possible in high school.
  2. Secure scholarships, apply for Federal work-study and use savings/cash to cover the balance of tuition once you’re an enrolled student.
  3. Only after you’ve exhausted options 1 & 2 should you consider borrowing money.

Cost Map for Southern New Hampshire University   (01/2019)

Requirement Homeschooling for College Credit Approximate Cost during homeschool

$600

Cost if taken through SNHU

$38,400

English 1, 3 cr. CLEP College Composition  Modular (no essay) $0* $960
English 2, 3 cr. NA NA $960
Math (Applied Statistics required), 3 cr. Saylor Academy BUS204 Applied Statistics, or Saylor Academy MA121 Introduction to Statistics, or DSST Principles of Statistics exam $25** $960
Perspectives in Liberal Arts, 3 cr. NA NA $960
Success Strategies for online learning, 3 cr. NA NA $960
Humanities, 3 cr. Saylor Academy ENVS203 Environmental Ethics, Justice & World Views $25** $960
Humanities, 3 cr. CLEP Humanities $0* $960
Macroeconomics (required), 3 cr. Saylor Academy ECON102 Macroeconomics or CLEP Macroeconomics $25** $960
Microeconomics (required), 3 cr. Saylor Academy ECON101 Microeconomics or CLEP Microeconomics $25** $960
Natural Science, 3 cr. CLEP Biology or Chemistry $0* $960
Natural Science, 3 cr. CLEP Natural Sciences $0* $960
Integration Course, 3 cr. NA NA $960
History, 3 cr. CLEP U.S. History 1 $0* $960
History, 3 cr. CLEP U.S. History 2 $0* $960
Financial Accounting, 3 cr. Saylor Academy BUS103 Financial Accounting, or CLEP Financial Accounting $25** $960
Managerial Accounting, 3 cr. Saylor Academy BUS105 Managerial Accounting $25** $960
Business Law, 3 cr. Saylor Academy BUS205 Business Law $25** $960
Principles of Finance, 3 cr. DSST Principles of Finance exam (FIN320) $100 $960
International Business, 3 cr. Study.com BUS120 International Business $100*** $960
Business Systems and Design, 3 cr. DSST Management Information Systems exam (IT210) $100 $960
Introduction to Marketing, 3 cr. Saylor Academy BUS203 Introduction to Marketing or CLEP Marketing exam $25** $960
Human Relations in Administration, 3 cr. NA NA $960
Operations Management, 3 cr. Study.com BUS112 Operations Management $100*** $960
Capstone, 3 cr. NA NA $960
Free Elective: CLEP American Literature $0* $960
Free Elective: CLEP Analyzing Interpreting Lit $0* $960
Free Elective: CLEP English Literature $0* $960
Free Elective: CLEP American Government $0* $960
Free Elective: CLEP Introduction Psychology $0* $960
Free Elective: CLEP Introduction Sociology $0* $960
Free Elective: CLEP Western Civilization 1 $0* $960
Free Elective: CLEP Western Civilization 2 $0* $960
Free Elective: CLEP Social Science & History $0* $960
Free Elective: TEEX Cybersecurity, 6 cr. $0 $1920
Business Concentration or electives, 0-15 credits taken with SNHU online NA NA $4,800
$600 $38,400

 

*Modern States is currently awarding vouchers to cover CLEP and AP exam fees as well as testing center fees.  You can obtain a free voucher through their website. 

**Saylor Academy allows for local proctoring $0 or digital proctoring $25.  This plan is calculated using digital proctoring, but you may deduct $25 per course if you choose local proctoring.

***Study.com bills by the month ($200) not per course, but allows you to complete 2 courses per month.  If you use Study.com, calculate taking 2 courses so the average becomes $100 per course.  If that pace is too fast, calculate 1 course as $200.


Important links for Southern New Hampshire University:

Saylor Academy Partnership Page

Southern New Hampshire University Dual Enrollment (on campus only)

Southern New Hampshire University CLEP Exam Equivalencies use COCE column

Need help from scratch?   Start here –> Homeschooling for College Credit

Want to know more about the types of college credit used in this chart? –>  Take me there.

See more Cost Maps

3 Student Loan Forgiveness Lies

In 2007, the United States signed into law the Federal Public Service Loan Forgiveness program.  Here’s the deal:  If you meet the following 3 requirements, you were (are) supposed to be eligible to participate:

  • Your loans must be federal direct loans.
  • Your employer must be a government organization at any level, a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit organization or some other type of not-for-profit organization that provides public service.
  • By the end, you need to have made 120 qualifying, on-time payments in an income-driven repayment plan or the standard repayment plan.

In other words, by working for 10 years without missing a payment, whatever is left will be wiped clean.  If you think this sounds like a great program, you’re not alone.  This program is often cited as one of the “reasons” to justify attending an expensive college program or taking out student loans despite plans to work in a lower paying industry like public service.

Over the past 10 years, these kinds of programs have been so popular, that CNBC reported that 70% of the public service employees they spoke to believed that they were accruing years toward full forgiveness (10 years) and would receive full forgiveness in the future.

“Just 96 people across the country have been released from their debt, thanks to public service loan forgiveness. Last year was the first year of eligiblity, since the program was signed into law in 2007 and it requires at least 10 years of payments to qualify. Nearly 30,000 borrowers have applied for the forgiveness, according to the Education Department’s data.” – CNBC @ANNIEREPORTER

In a nightmare of red tape, “gotcha” rules and restrictions, out of the 30,000 who had already worked a FULL 10 YEARS and made payments for all 10 years, only 96 have been granted loan forgiveness.

96

That’s not a typo, 96 out of 30,000 who did their 10 years of service actually had their loans forgiven.  I’ve only found a small bit of media attention around this issue, but I can’t figure out why it’s not making headlines!?  That’s not even 1%, that’s not even half a percentage!  That’s no one.  That’s a big, fat, goose-egg.

As bad as I feel for those hoping to qualify for this program, what we have to do for our teens is in front of us- not behind us. Let’s talk about moving forward and talk about wisdom.


LIE #1) Everyone graduates.  Truth:  only 1/2 will.  That’s a hard pill to swallow, and naturally, everyone thinks they’re in the half that will graduate.  Together we could build a list of 50 reasons people don’t graduate college – and most of them are legitimate,, valid or unexpected.  (as opposed to a person just randomly flunking out, which isn’t usually the reason, though as long as we believe that’s the reason, we avoid considering that it could happen to our teens).  The only way to proceed with wisdom is to proceed under the “worst case scenario” assumption.  I know 3 people in real life who left college with only a few classes left to take. These are smart people, but life happened. The truth is that predicting the future 4 years in advance is impossible.  Unfinished degrees do not qualify for loan forgiveness.

  • wisdom:  bring the goal post of a degree closer if you can.  Reduce the number of classes/ credits your teen needs for their degree by starting in high school.  You can homeschool for college credit, use AP classes, use dual enrollment, and even summer sessions. A typical bachelor’s degree requires 40 courses total.  At least 10 of those can be done in high school.  Bring the goal post closer to leverage the odds of finishing.

LIE #2)  Loan forgiveness will erase my debt.  Truth: to even be eligible for loan forgiveness, you must first make payments perfectly for 10 years.  Literally, perfectly.  That means not a single late payment, no deferment, no gaps at all.  Want to cut your hours from full to part-time?  Can’t do it – disqualified.   Want to stay home and raise your children? Can’t do it – disqualified.  A moment ago we considered how hard it would be to predict the future 4 years in advance when we’re talking about a full decade, it’s not even a conversation.  While there are plenty of allowances and exceptions, tens of thousands who applied (after 10 years of work) were denied for not meeting the exact allowance or exception.

  • wisdom:  assume all debt must be repaid.  If you must borrow for your degree, wisdom is to borrow only for the LAST year of college, when your odds of completion are significantly higher.  If you do borrow, make repayments immediately –  don’t even wait for the “6 month grace period” that starts after graduation. Begin immediately and with intensity.

 

LIE #3) Loan forgiveness makes good financial sense.   EVEN if you’re one of the 96 who was meticulous and received forgiveness, let’s look at the math.  The Federal student loan’s official repayment calculator allows us to enter in the amount of our loan, and determine the monthly payments.  I’m trying to avoid being too mathy here, but let’s assume you borrow $50,000 for your 4-year degree (or $12,500 per year).  Only a maximum of about $20,000 can be “subsidized” which means you don’t get billed interest while you’re in school (about $5,000 per year borrowed this way) and the remaining $30,000 starts charging you interest from the day you borrow (about $7,500 per year borrowed this way).

Since people seeking loan forgiveness must deliberately HAVE A BALANCE at the end of the typical 10-year term, the Federal Student Loan Repayment program doesn’t put you on a “regular” repayment schedule. The schedule for students who want this method are typically placed on a 25-year repayment schedule.

Under the standard 120-month repayment, a student will pay $550 per month for 120 months.  The total they’ll repay with interest is about $67,000.

A student who enters repayment with the intention of using forgiveness will enter a 300-month repayment program.  They’ll pay only $270 per month.  As such, at the 10-year mark, this student has only repaid $14,000 of their whole loan! (even though they’ve made payments totaling over $32,000)  If forgiveness is granted, the remaining $36,000 will disappear (hooray if you’re one of the lucky 96) but the other tens of thousands locked into this repayment program will actually repay $87,000.  A significantly larger amount to repay – not to mention being more than 40 years old by the time you get out from under the loan.

  • wisdom:  use your college’s transfer policy and CLEP/AP policy to the maximum.  Start in high school and take advantage of transfer agreements.  Whittle the “rack rate” tuition down by resourcefully planning the degree as carefully as possible.  (see our Cost Maps to see this in action)  Apply for scholarships every week that you’re enrolled in college, and if you have college savings, use them as late in the game as possible.  Borrowing the absolute minimum to pay the tuition bill (pay cash for living expenses) and tighten the budget.  Once you’ve decided to borrow, repay immediately and with gusto.  Repaying your loans as quickly as possible assures that you’re not wasting 10 years of your life working at a job that may not even forgive your loans.  By taking control of the college process, you remain in control of your finances and power over your future.