Posted in CLEP, DSST, Math

DSST Math for the Liberal Arts vs. CLEP College Mathematics

What is the difference between the DSST Math for the Liberal Arts and CLEP College Mathematics exam?

~a question asked by MANY homeschool moms

Exam Information

DSST Math for the Liberal Arts

This exam was developed to enable schools to award credit to students for knowledge equivalent to that learned by students taking the course. This exam covers topics such as real number systems; sets and logic; metric system, conversions and geometry; algebra, graphs and functions (as applied to real-life applications); linear systems and inequalities; exponents and logarithms including financial literacy and counting, probability theory and statistics. The exam contains 80 questions to be answered in 2 hours. The use of a non-programmable calculator is permitted in this exam.

Passing Score for Math for the Liberal Arts
ACE Recommended Score: 400
Semester Hours: 3

CLEP College Mathematics

This examination covers material generally taught in a college course for nonmathematics majors and majors in fields not requiring knowledge of advanced mathematics.

The examination contains approximately 60 questions to be answered in 90 minutes. Some of these are pretest questions that will not be scored. Any time candidates spend on tutorials and providing personal information is in addition to the actual testing time.

Questions on the College Mathematics examination require candidates to demonstrate the following abilities in the approximate proportions indicated.

  • Solving routine, straightforward problems (about 50% of the examination)
  • Solving nonroutine problems requiring an understanding of concepts and the application of skills and concepts (about 50% of the examination)

The subject matter of the College Mathematics examination is drawn from the following topics. The percentages next to the main topics indicate the approximate percentage of exam questions on that topic.

A scientific (nongraphing) calculator, the TI-30XS MultiView™, is integrated into the exam software and available to students during the entire testing time. Students are expected to know how and when to make appropriate use of the calculator.

Information about the scientific calculator, including opportunities to practice, is available here.

Passing Score for College Mathematics
ACE Recommended Score: 50
Semester Hours: 6


Overlap Between the CLEP and DSST Exams

The following information is taken from the DSST Math for the Liberal Arts fact sheet and the CLEP College Mathematics information page. This was my best attempt to match up the content of each test, however, I do not guarantee 100% accuracy! If you see any errors, please leave a comment and I will update the chart.

Blue indicates content overlap between the DSST and CLEP math exams. In some instances, the overlap is assumed because it is a foundational concept.

DSST Math for the Liberal Arts

CLEP College Math

REAL NUMBERS SYSTEMS – 11% NUMBERS – 10%
Real numbers: Natural Numbers, Integers, Rational Numbers, Irrational Numbers, The real number line. Operations with real numbers and their properties (including the distributive properties) Properties of numbers and their operations: integers
and rational, irrational, and real numbers (including
recognizing rational and irrational numbers)
Percentages; Fractions and reducing fractions; conversion between decimal numbers and fractions; operations with fractions (including distributive property)
Prime and composite numbers; divisibility rules; prime factors of composite numbers Elementary number theory: factors and divisibility, primes and composites, odd and even integers, and the fundamental theorem of arithmetic
Absolute value
Systems of Numeration: Place value or positional value numeration, Base 10 expanded forms; base 2 numbers; conversion between base 10 and base 2; (Including Roman Numerals)
METRIC SYSTEMS, CONVERSIONS, AND GEOMETRY – 12%
Introduction to metrics and U.S. customary unit systems
Conversions between metric and U.S. customary unit systems, including Dimensional Analysis Measurement: unit conversion, scientific notation, and numerical precision
GEOMETRY- 10%
Properties of lines and angles Parallel and perpendicular lines; Properties of circles: circumference, area, central angles, inscribed angles, and sectors;
Perimeter and area of 2D geometric objects; Area, Surface area and volume of 3D solid objects Properties of triangles and quadrilaterals: perimeter, area, similarity, and the Pytharorean theorem
SETS AND LOGIC – 16% LOGICS AND SETS – 15%
The Nature of Sets
Subsets and Set Operations, (setbuilder notation; roster form, using sets to solve problems) Set relationships, subsets, disjoint sets, equality of sets,
Using Venn Diagrams to Study Set Operations  and Venn diagrams
Infinite sets
Operations on sets: union, intersection, complement, and Cartesian product
Simple and compound statements; qualifiers “and” and “or” and their symbols; conjunction and disjunction; conditional and biconditional statements including Qualifiers Logical operations and statements: conditional statements, conjunctions, disjunctions, negations, hypotheses, logical conclusions, converses, inverses, counterexamples, contrapositives, and logical equivalence
Truth value of a compound statement including Truth Tables
Types of Statements ( Negations of Conditional Statements and De Morgan’s Laws
Logical Arguments including Euler Circles
COUNTING, PROBABILITY THEORY, AND STATISTICS – 20% COUNTING AND PROBABILITY – 10%
Fundamentals of Probability including the Counting Principle
Permutations and Combinations Counting problems: the multiplication rule, combinations, and permutations
Events Involving Not and Or
Odds and Conditional Probability Probability: union, intersection, independent events, mutually exclusive events, complementary events, conditional probabilities, and expected value
DATA ANALYSIS AND STATISTICS – 15%
Mean, Median and Mode; Range Numerical summaries of data: mean (average), median, mode, and range
Variance and Standard Deviation Standard deviation and normal distribution (conceptual questions only)
Graphical representation (including Bar graph, pie chart, histogram, line graph, scatterplots etc.) Data interpretation and representation: tables, bar graphs, line graphs, circle graphs, pie charts, scatterplots, and histograms
EXPONENTS AND LOGARITHMS INCLUDING FINANCIAL LITERACY – 22% FINANCIAL MATHEMATICS – 20%
Properties of Logarithms
Logarithmic and Exponential Functions
Percents, percent change, markups, discounts, taxes, profit, and loss
Simple Interest; Compound Interest Interest: simple, compound, continuous interest, effective interest rate, effective annual yield or annual percentage rate (APR)
Present value and future value
Installment Buying
Student Loans and Home Buying
Investing in Stocks and Bonds
ALGEBRA, GRAPHS, AND FUNCTIONS (AS APPLIED TO REAL LIFE APPLICATIONS) – 11% ALGEBRA AND FUNCTIONS – 20%
LINEAR SYSTEMS AND INEQUALITIES – 8%
Order of operations
Simplifying expressions; equations with one variable; proportion problems
Evaluation of formulas
Solving Linear Equations including applications and systems Solving equations, linear inequalities, and systems of linear equations by analytic and graphical methods
Interpretation, representation, and evaluation of functions: numerical, graphical, symbolic, and descriptive methods
Graphs of linear equations in the rectangular coordinate system; Graphing and solving Linear
inequalities; Graphing and solving systems of
inequalities
Graphs of functions: translations, horizontal and vertical reflections, and symmetry about the x-axis, the y-axis, and the origin
Linear and exponential growth
Functions including polynomials (not to include rational, exponential and logarithmic Functions)
The Rectangular Coordinate System and Linear Equations in Two Variables

 

Posted in CLEP, DSST

English Composition Resource List

TYPES OF WRITING:
Narrative writing – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eByzm-hEByM
Informative writing – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=53L-5zE7Ibw
Argumentative writing – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-lzGy5gizKg
Critical Response writing – http://write.siu.edu/_common/documents/h…sponse.pdf
http://tipsforresearchpapersandessays.bl…essay.html

ELEMENTS OF EFFECTIVE WRITING:
Audience and purpose analysis – http://www.readwritethink.org/files/reso…dience.pdf
http://open.lib.umn.edu/writingforsucces…d-content/
Pre-writing strategies – http://slc.berkeley.edu/you-start-writin…chniques-0
Drafting –
https://depts.washington.edu/owrc/Handou…0Paper.pdf

READING AND WRITING ARGUMENTS:
Identifying elements in arguments/analyzing arguments – https://library.wlu.ca/sites/default/fil…uments.pdf
http://web.mnstate.edu/malonech/Psy481/N…uments.htm
Types of evidence – https://prezi.com/4_nw_awnic2r/forms-of-…-argument/
https://proofwiki.org/wiki/Definition:Logical_Argument
https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/logical
https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/anecdotal
https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/source

USING SECONDARY SOURCES:
Finding sources – http://libguides.merrimack.edu/research_help/Sources
http://awelu.srv.lu.se/sources-and-refer…f-sources/
https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/552/03/
Evaluating sources – https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/553/2/
https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/553/3/
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j8OAPxcXibo
Credibility in sources – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PLTOVoHbH5c
Using sources – https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/563/01/
Citing and documenting –
https://writing.wisc.edu/Handbook/DocGeneral.html
Citation styles – http://simpson.edu/hawley/documentation-styles/
https://www.thebalance.com/which-style-g…se-1360722
https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/560/01/
https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/747/24/
https://owl.english.purdue.edu/owl/resource/717/02/
https://www.midmich.edu/student-resource…c-citation

Quizlet flashcards – https://quizlet.com/242161089/principles…ash-cards/

http://citationgame.org/

Posted in CLEP, High School

CLEP for 9th, 10th, 11th, and 12th Grades

If you’re planning CLEP exams as part of your teen’s high school journey, you’re probably worried about selecting a first, or next, exam.  Should your teen take Natural Sciences or Chemistry?  Humanities or American Literature?  When is the best time to take Composition?  Since my goal is to help you become your child’s best guidance counselor, I’m going to give you the tools to make that call yourself!

Through my own testing journey, I’ve found that CLEP exams tend to represent one of two exam types:

CLEP Exam Types

  1. Individual subjects
  2. Cumulative subjects

 

CLEP Exam Types

How and when your teen prepares for any given exam depends first on the exam type.  This is actually a really big deal- and may make the difference between success and failure!

An individual subject is one that you can approach with no pre-existing knowledge about the subject, and learn it well enough to pass an exam.  A few examples of these exam types are American Literature or Sociology.  In both cases, you can start learning from scratch without any kind of disadvantage.

An example of a cumulative subject is one that does require prior knowledge.  Exams in this category include College Algebra or Spanish.  In the case of College Algebra, you can’t begin the study of the subject without previous math preparation (ideally completion of Algebra 2) and in the case of Spanish, you’ll have to learn Spanish before taking the exam.  In both cases, where you start is a significant factor in determining how fast and how easily you can learn the material.

Why should you care?  Because in order to choose the best time for your teen to take a specific course/exam, you need to know where it best fits into your homeschool program.

Some exams fall neatly into categories, others can go either way.  I’ve sorted them for you.  Exams in the “Decide for Yourself” category are multi-disciplinary or require at least familiarity with elementary content before approaching the subject at the college level.  Meaning they incorporate more than one subject.    The exam titles in the list are active links,  so you can click the title to explore the content decide for yourself.

Clearly Individual Subject Exams

Clearly Cumulative Subjects


 

Tips for Individual Subjects & Exam Prep

  • Learning creates the foundation of knowledge, test prep memorizes facts and figures.  Make a learning plan that includes both.
  • If your teen typically studies one subject at a time, estimate 1 month of learning and test prep for each subject.  (Monday-Friday about 3-4 hours per day = about 60 hours, or 1/2 high school credit)
  • If your teen typically studies multiple subjects at a time, estimate about 60 hours divided over the course of your block, trimester, semester, or unit that you use.
  • I’ve never met someone who told me they were over-prepared for their exam.  When in doubt, allow a little extra time.
  • Some subjects offer exams in 2 parts (US History, Western Civ., Economics) and lend themselves to a full year of high school study.  The mid-year point is a good time to take the first exam, end of year is a good time to take the second exam.
  • Keep in mind all CLEP subjects are 100/200 level college learning- that makes availability of resources abundant!!  Discarded textbooks, thrift store finds, and online MOOCs are excellent sources of learning material. Learning material doesn’t have to be current.
  • Exam prep material should match the current edition of the exam so your test prep matches what they’ll be tested on.
  • Group subjects together to build on knowledge (Psychology, Educational Psychology, Human Growth and Development all have some cross-over)
  • Start with a subject your teen likes.
  • If reading level isn’t at or above the 12th grade level, learning the content might not be enough to pass.  Study the subject now, continue to work on reading level, and take the test in a year or two when reading level is higher.

Tips for Cumulative Subjects & Exam Prep

  • You’ll want to investigate what pre-existing knowledge is necessary to learn the subject.  For instance, Calculus requires first knowing Precalculus which first requires College Algebra which first requires Algebra 2 (high school).  The exam prep material assumes all preexisting knowledge is in place.
  • All college level sciences require a good foundation in high school level sciences.  For instance, college level chemistry assumes knowledge of high school level biology and chemistry as well as algebra.  Starting from scratch for CLEP Chemistry will be exceptionally challenging without that base- but not impossible.
  • Both composition exams and the Analyzing Literature exam assume strong command of college level language (reading and writing).  If you use standardized tests in your homeschool, your student should be testing beyond 12th grade Language Arts before you begin exam prep.
  • Foreign Language CLEP exams cover 2 semesters of college foreign language.  Your teen should have completed at least high school level 1 and probably 2 before attempting.

Now that you have a good understanding of if an exam will make up a subject in your homeschool, or if it will follow a year or more of study, you’re ready to make a schedule!  You can read my entire original post about creating a sample here:

Sample High School CLEP Schedule

In short, only YOU can decide where CLEP exams make sense in your homeschool schedule.  It’s based on what they’ve done, and what they plan to do in the coming years.  In part, it also helps to know if you’re planning to use dual enrollment options, and whether or not they have zeroed in on a college major.  The more information you have, the more specific you can be – but being uncertain isn’t a reason to do nothing.  If you have a teen with the knowledge, a CLEP exam can be a wonderful “final exam” in the bank.  The exam scores can be held for 20 years before being used, so the risk/reward ratio really supports testing while its fresh in their mind.

This is only ONE sample of how a family might inject CLEP credit into their homeschool.

SAMPLE 9th GRADE SCHEDULE

9th Grade
Subject Area Semester 1 Semester 2 CLEP Exam
ENGLISH 9th Grade English 9th Grade English (N/A)
MATH Algebra 1 Algebra 1 (N/A)
SCIENCE Survey Science Survey Science (N/A)
HISTORY United States History United States History U.S. History 1U.S. History 2
FOREIGN LANGUAGE Spanish 1 Spanish 1 (N/A)
ELECTIVE Typing Photography (N/A)

In this sample, we are laying a foundation for future exams in English, Math, Spanish, and Science….but we’re not there yet.  We are going to allow some foundational learning to happen first, and then we’ll inject college credit when our teen is better prepared.  Instead, in this year, we are using a full year curriculum for United States History, and taking the U.S. History 1 exam at the half-way point, and then U.S. History 2 at the conclusion of the school year.  These two exams work perfectly together!


SAMPLE 10th GRADE SCHEDULE

10th Grade
Subject Area Semester 1 Semester 2 CLEP Exam
ENGLISH 10th Grade English 10th Grade English (N/A)
MATH Algebra 2 Algebra 2 (N/A)
SCIENCE Biology Biology Biology CLEP
HISTORY World History World History (N/A)
FOREIGN LANGUAGE Spanish 2 Spanish 2 Spanish -maybe?
ELECTIVE Physical Education Health (N/A)

In this year, we continue to develop English and Math skills but are attempting two very big CLEP exams.  Both Biology and Spanish cover a full year of content, so we’ll play this by ear.  If our teen isn’t a solid “A” student, we may wish to eliminate the exams from our girl4plan or wait until later to attempt the.  Spanish is a tough call because if you’re only allowing 2 years of study, it’s now or never.  On the other hand, a 3rd or 4th year of Spanish would be ideal since we’re aiming for a high score (Level 2).  On the other hand, if we stop now, we have time to learn a second language.  As we go into 11th grade, we may have the added option of taking college courses through dual enrollment, which throws a monkey wrench into things a bit.  For the purpose of this sample, we’ll assume you’re only using CLEP.


SAMPLE 11th GRADE SCHEDULE

11th Grade
Subject Area Semester 1 Semester 2 CLEP Exam
ENGLISH 11th Grade English 11th Grade English (N/A)
MATH College Algebra with PreCalculus College Algebra with PreCalculus College MathCollege Algebra
SCIENCE Chemistry Chemistry Natural SciencesChemistry
HISTORY Western Civ. I Western Civ. II Western Civ. IWestern Civ. II
ELECTIVE American Literature American Literature American Lit.Analyzing & Interpreting Lit.
ELECTIVE Music Appreciation Art Appreciation Humanities

We are experiencing major traction now.  In fact, while the CLEP exams all align perfectly to the subjects on the schedule, it may be too aggressive for all but the most motivated students.  I included them anyway so you could see how it fits together.  If you’ll take a moment to look at the SCIENCE row, the Natural Science CLEP exam would be perfect at the close of the 1st semester because that exam is 50% biology (taken last year) and 25% chemistry – a student with solid knowledge of biology and a cursory knowledge of chemistry can pass this exam without addressing the physics segment.  Chemistry, as its own exam, is difficult and should only be considered after a full year of robust chemistry study.  If I could also draw your attention to Humanities, that exam requires knowledge of music and art, but also a lot of the Western Civilization knowledge intersects with this exam, making it a perfect fit for this schedule.


NO SAMPLE 12th GRADE SCHEDULE

At this point, my advice is that you’ll select remaining courses and exams that align with a target college.  College policy, awarding of credit, and accepted exams should all make their way into the conversation when selecting a college.  It’s reasonable that a college might not take all your teen’s hard work, but if a college doesn’t accept most of it, you may want to reconsider!  An encouragement to choose wisely comes from my friend Carol.  She allowed me to share her story with you.   We just saved $96,780

And by the way, were you keeping count?  How many potential college credits does the 11th grader in the sample have?

60

Our teen also took a total of 13 exams (I included Spanish) over the course of 3 years. Since CLEP exams cost about $100 each, the total financial investment was about $1300. Since a family can pay as they go, it allows most people to budget and plan for a good portion of their teen’s college education well ahead of time!  Not to mention the savings associated with books, meals, dorms, etc. that happen later.

Assuming the sample student attends a college that accepts all 60 credits, our sample student will have 2 years completed toward their bachelor’s degree, may have already earned an associate’s degree.  (We still have 12th grade left, and can fill in courses for a degree if we want)

For those wondering about the cost savings, you may want to revisit my post listing the current Cost of Tuition in the United States and calculate your potential savings based on the kind of college your teen may attend.  In general, if a college credit costs $325, your teen earned 60 of them for $1,300 over 3 years instead of paying (or borrowing) $19,500.  Now THAT’S something to get excited about!

Posted in AP Advanced Placement, CLEP, SAT, Saylor Academy, Straighterline, Study.com

Forms of ID when Homeschooling for College Credit

Parents of teens earning college credit in high school may be shocked to find that many exams require identification.  For those with a driver’s license, that’s usually enough, but many of you have teens without a driver’s license. What can they do?

You’ll find some very different policies regarding the acceptable forms of ID based on the test your teen is taking.  I’ve done my best to collect the most current information from the more popular exams we talk about here, but know that companies can change their requirements at any time!  Please, allow yourself enough time to confirm and also obtain acceptable ID for your teen.

 

CLEP (College Board)

Identification: Your driver’s license, passport, or other government-issued identification that includes your photograph and signature. You will be asked to show this identification to be admitted to the testing area. The last name on your ID must match the name on your registration ticket. The ID you bring must meet the following criteria:

  • Be government-issued.
  • Be an original document—photocopied documents are not acceptable.
  • Be valid and current—expired documents (bearing expiration dates that have passed) are not acceptable, no matter how recently they may have expired.
  • Bear the test taker’s full name, in English language characters, exactly as it appears on the registration ticket, including the order of the names.
  • Middle initials are optional and only need to match the first letter of the middle name when present on both the ticket and the identification.
  • Bear a recent recognizable photograph that clearly matches the test taker.
  • Include the test taker’s signature.
  • Be in good condition with clearly legible text and a clearly visible photograph.
  • Military test takers must bring their military ID.
  • Homeschooled students and high school students: If you do not have the required government-issued ID, please complete a Student ID Form (.pdf/55 KB) which is valid for one year. The form must be accompanied by a recognizable photo with a school or notary seal overlapping the photo. The form must be signed in front of a school official or notary. If you fail to present appropriate identification, you will not be tested.
  • Examples of other types of acceptable indentification include:
    • Government-issued passport with name, photograph and signature
    • Driver’s license with name, photograph, and signature
    • State or Province ID issued by the motor vehicle agency with name, photograph, and signature
    • Military ID with name, photograph, and electronic signature
    • National ID with name, photograph, and signature
    • Tribal ID card with name, photograph, and signature
    • A naturalization card or certificate of citizenship with name, photograph, and signature
    • A Permanent Resident Card (Green Card) with name, photograph, and signature
    • Source link

SAT & AP (College Board)

Note:  AP Students taking AP exams at their high school do not need identification.  More information about AP exams:  AP Bulletin for Parents

Test center staff will compare the information on your Admission Ticket and your photo ID with the test center roster to confirm your registration and identity. You cannot be admitted to the test center if any of the information does not match. This includes the use of a nickname on one item but your full name on another. Source link

The staff is not required to hold your seat if you did not bring acceptable identification.

ID Checklist

ID documents must meet all of these requirements:

  • Be a valid (unexpired) photo ID that is government-issued or issued by the school that you currently attend. School IDs from the prior school year are valid through December of the current calendar year. (For example, school IDs from 2015-16 can be used through December 31, 2016.)
  • Be an original, physical document (not photocopied or electronic).
  • Bear your full, legal name exactly as it appears on your Admission Ticket, including the order of the names.
  • Bear a recent recognizable photograph that clearly matches both your appearance on test day and the photo on your Admission Ticket.
  • Be in good condition, with clearly legible English language text and a clearly visible photograph.

Note: Not all of these requirements apply to Talent Search identification documents used by students who are in the eighth grade or below at the time of testing; however, Talent Search identification forms must bear an original student/parent signature.

Important:

Check Your ID—Every Time

Even if an ID got you into a test center before, it does not guarantee it will be acceptable in the future.

Acceptable ID Examples:

  • Government-issued driver’s license or non-driver ID card
  • Official school-produced student ID card from the school you currently attend
  • Government-issued passport
  • Government-issued military or national identification card
  • Talent Search Identification Forms (allowed for eighth grade and below)
  • SAT Student ID Form (.pdf/490KB); must be prepared by the school you currently attend or a notary, if home-schooled

Unacceptable ID Examples:

  • Any document that does not meet the requirements
  • Any document that is worn, torn, scuffed, scarred, or otherwise damaged
  • Electronic document presented on a device
  • Any document that appears tampered with or digitally altered
  • Any document that bears a statement such as “not valid as identification”
  • Credit or debit card of any kind, even one with a photograph
  • Birth certificate
  • Social Security card
  • Employee ID card
  • Missing Child (“ChildFind”) ID card
  • Any temporary ID card

More About Names

If you need to make a change to your name after registering, please contact Customer Service at least 30 days prior to your intended test date. Middle names and initials are optional on your documents; however, if provided, the middle initial must exactly match the first letter of your middle name on your ID.

More About Photos

You may not be allowed to enter the test center, let alone take the test, if test center staff cannot sufficiently authenticate your identification from the ID you present. Your score may even be withheld or canceled.

Admission to the test center is no guarantee that the ID you provided is valid or that your scores will be reported. All reported or suspected cases of questionable ID or test-taker identity are subject to our review and approval before, during, and after the test administration.

ID Requirements Apply All Day

You should keep your ID and Admission Ticket with you at all times while at the test center, including during breaks. You may be required to show your ID and Admission Ticket and/or to sign a test center log multiple times and at various points throughout the test administration.

If it is discovered after your test administration that you used a false or invalid identification, your test scores will be canceled, and you will forfeit your registration and test fees. Your parent(s) or legal guardian(s) (if you are under 18), your high school, and the colleges and programs you have designated to receive your score reports will be notified and may be told why your scores were canceled. Law enforcement authorities may also be notified when fraud is suspected, and you may be banned from future tests.

If you fail to comply with these identification requirements and policies, you may be dismissed from the test center and your scores may be withheld or canceled. If you are dismissed from the test center prior to completing the test because of invalid or unacceptable ID, or failure to comply with these ID requirements and policies, your test fees will not be refunded.

If You Do Not Have Acceptable ID

If you do not have another form of acceptable ID you may be able to use the Student ID Form (.pdf/490KB). This form must be prepared and authenticated by the school you currently attend or by a notary if you are home-schooled. A current photo must be attached to the form in the area indicated before the form is notarized. This form is only valid as ID if you are testing in the United States and for test-takers under 21 years of age.

If You Are Waitlisted

In countries where waitlist status is used, you must present an acceptable school- or government-issued photo ID that has been issued in the country in which you are testing. Foreign passports, foreign national IDs, or IDs from foreign schools will not be accepted.

If You Are 21 or Older

If you will be 21 or older on test day, the only acceptable form of identification is an official government-issued photo ID, such as a driver’s license or passport, that meets all of the requirements above. Student ID cards are not valid forms of identification for test-takers who are 21 or older.

Testing in India, Ghana, Nepal, Nigeria, and Pakistan

The only acceptable form of identification is a valid passport with your name, photograph, and signature. There are no exceptions to this policy.

Testing in Egypt, Korea, Thailand, and Vietnam

A valid passport or valid national ID card with your name, photograph, and signature are the only acceptable forms of ID. If you travel to another country to test, you must provide a passport as identification. There are no exceptions to this policy.


DSST (Prometric)

Q.4 What form of ID should I bring to the testing location when I take a DSST exam?

A. Prior to the test administration, all test takers must present current and valid picture identification such as a driver’s license, passport, or picture student identification. DANTES funded eligible military test takers must provide a valid Common Access Card (CAC). Only test takers should be permitted into the testing room. Unauthorized visitors are not permitted in the testing room at any time. Source link


Straighterline (Proctor U*)

Proctor U is the 3rd party online proctoring system currently used by Straighterline.  Proctor U’s website:  Always have your ID ready before connecting to a proctor. If you are unsure of what identification is needed for your exam, please reach out to your instructor for clarification. In some instances, a second ID may be required. This includes a school ID or passport. Source link

Straighterline’s Proctoring Page:  Source link

Two forms of IDs, one of which must be a government-issued photo ID, as proof of identification. Valid forms of government identification are as follows:

  • U.S. Passport or U.S. Passport Card
  • Driver’s license or ID card issued by a State provided it contains a photograph or information such as name, date of birth, gender, height, eye color, and address
  • ID card issued by federal, state or local government agencies or entities, provided it contains a photograph or information such as name, date of birth, gender, height, eye color, and address
  • U.S. Military card
  • Foreign passport

Saylor Academy 

OPTION 1 – Proctor U*

Proctor U is the 3rd party online proctoring system currently used by Saylor Academy.  Proctor U’s website:  Always have your ID ready before connecting to a proctor. If you are unsure of what identification is needed for your exam, please reach out to your instructor for clarification. In some instances, a second ID may be required. This includes a school ID or passport. Source link

Saylor’s website:  When it is time for you to take your test, log in to ProctorU and press the blue button under the “My Exam” tab to launch your proctoring session. To verify your identity, your Proctor will ask you to use a webcam to show a form of identification, and then answer a number of questions based on public record information.  If you live outside of the United States, ProctorU will not have access to public record information, and you will instead be asked to show a second form of ID. Source link

OPTION 2 – Private Proctor

Detailed information is not provided for this option.  Source link  While the proctoring instructions do state that the proctor must  “Verify student identification prior to entering the testing area” there are no further instructions.  My recommendation is to contact Saylor Academy well in advance for clarification.  Saylor Academy Help Center. 


Study.com (Software Secure)

Study uses Software Secure AKA Remote Proctor Now as the third party proctoring service.  Study’s proctored exam instructions simply state a student must provide “a photo ID.”  Source link


 

 

ACT 

Acceptable Forms of Identification

Only the following forms of identification are acceptable. If it is not on this list, it is not acceptable, and you will not be admitted to test.  Source link

Current official photo ID

Must be an original, current (valid) ID issued by a city/state/federal government agency or your school. Note: School ID must be in hard plastic card format. Paper or electronic formats are NOT acceptable. Your first and last names must match the ticket. The photo must be clearly recognizable as you.

ACT Student Identification Form with photo  

You MUST present this ACT Student Identification Form (PDF) with photo if you do not have a current official photo ID as described above. It must be completed by a school official or notary public; neither may be a relative. All items must be completed.

ACT Talent Search Student Identification Form 

If you are participating in an Academic Talent Search program and were not required to submit a photo with your registration you must present your ACT Talent Search Identification form. If you are participating in an Academic Talent Search program and were required to submit a photo when you registered, you must present either a current official photo ID or an ACT Student Identification Form with photo.

Unacceptable Forms of Identification

You will not be admitted if you present any forms of ID other than those listed as acceptable. The following are examples of unacceptable identification:

  • ACT ticket alone
  • Birth certificate
  • ChildFind ID card
  • Credit, charge, bank or check cashing cards, even with photo
  • Diploma
  • Family portrait or graduation picture, even if the name is imprinted on the photo
  • Fishing or hunting license
  • ID issued by an employer
  • ID letter that is not an official ACT identification form
  • Learner’s driving permit (if it doesn’t include a photo)
  • Temporary/replacement driver’s license (if it doesn’t include a photo)
  • Organization membership card
  • Passport or other photo ID so old that the person presenting it cannot be identified
  • Personal recognition by anyone, including members of the test center staff, classmates, parents, counselors, and teachers
  • Photo ID of parents
  • Photo with your name embossed or printed on it by a photographer
  • Photocopies or reproductions
  • Photos issued by a business for promotional purposes (e.g., amusement parks)
  • Police report of a stolen wallet or purse
  • Printed, stamped, or photocopied signatures
  • Published photo, including yearbook or newspaper
  • Report card
  • Social Security card
  • Telephone calls to counselors, teachers, or school officials
  • Traffic ticket, even with a physical description and signature
  • Transcript, even with photo
  • Web page with photo

 

ID2

 

*Proctor U :  While not disclosed on any the websites I visited, Proctor U has the ability to use a process called Acxiom-X identifiers.  These identifiers could require your student to answer a number of “unique” questions that they should know about themselves.  The best resource I found identified potential 115 questions in their question bank.  Acxiom’s website states

“The Acxiom Identify-X Authenticate process uses unique data generated questions to identify an individual and then verifies these individuals through our high-quality database, offering greater security to the end user.

Acxiom’s identification platform utilizes demographic and geographic data in challenge questions with nearly 900 data elements for more than 300 million individuals. Identify-X Authenticate data comes from public, publicly available and non-public proprietary databases. Identify-X Authenticate data is current and regularly updated daily, weekly and monthly, depending upon the data source.”

Obviously not all of these would apply- but examples of possible Acxiom questions that could be asked during identification verification when using Proctor U include:

  • Based on your driver’s license do you wear corrective lenses?
  • What professional licenses do you hold?
  • What subdivision do you currently reside in?
  • What state does your relative Joe live in?
  • How many fireplaces did you have in your last residence?
Posted in CLEP

The Easiest CLEP?

If you haven’t heard it yet, there is a pervasive myth that Analyzing and Interpreting Literature is “the easiest CLEP” and “passable with no study.” In this post, I’d like to explore what makes this CLEP “the easiest” for many students, and an unexpected “nightmare” for others.

Official Analyzing and Interpreting Literature CLEP Page

Unlike many other CLEP exams, this exam doesn’t have to follow a semester or year-long course.  Instead, this exam is a literature comprehension exam and must be attempted only by those with strong reading ability and endurance.  If you choose to offer a literature course for your teen (American Literature and English Literature both also offer CLEP exams) this exam fits in well.  Unlike the American or English Literature CLEPs, this exam requires no recall of specific works or authors – just reading.  This exam is worth 3 college credits.

NOTE:  This exam used to be worth 6 credits.  If you took this exam prior to Feb 28, 2015, your college may honor the old assessment and award 6 credits.  Exams taken from March 1, 2015-current are valued at only 3 credits. 

Already confused? watch my “What is CLEP?” video

What is analyzing and interpreting literature?  It is the academic process of breaking down a piece of poetry or prose into components and using critical thinking to understand their meaning. 

cautionThis CLEP at home -vs- COLLEGE ENROLLMENT

A basic undergraduate literature course will usually expose the student to both classic and contemporary literature.  The scope will include poetry, drama, fiction, and nonfiction.  In college courses like this, professors often require an “Anthology” book instead of a textbook or whole pieces of literature.  Passages about slavery, politics, romance, and history are likely to be included in most literary anthologies.  Courses in literature will almost always involve extensive discussion and often some type of controversy.  Additionally, a college literature course generally requires a lot of writing. College courses are based on the premise that the attendees are adults, so no consideration is given to your teen’s age.    Choosing a “more conservative” or “more liberal” college doesn’t assure that the teacher’s opinions will match yours.   All things being equal, I like this subject as a CLEP exam instead of a college / dual enrollment course for teens that have read extensively.  

If you want simple:  use this exam after or alongside a regular high school literature curriculum (or following several years of reading widely).  Test prep for this exam can be done in a couple days because the bulk of the content is simply reading comprehension.  There are a few literary terms your teen should become familiar with.  More on that later.   In our home, I consistently use a layering technique to teach my children subjects that will also be part of a CLEP exam.  This exam, however, is a little different.  The best approach here is just to wait. Wait until they read well.  I put a video on youtube explaining how to layer resources.

For the curious, my husband and I took this exam in March 2007.  My score was 59, his was 50.  I liked this exam, but he hated it!  -Jennifer Cook DeRosa

The Easiest CLEP

When I started preparing for this exam in 2007, I read time and again that I didn’t need to study- it was by far the “easiest CLEP” ever, and that “everyone” passes.  I spent a little bit of time googling literary terms (they’ll be included at the bottom for your reference) and I grabbed my husband to join me.  (Afterall, everyone passes!)  The multiple choice exam asks 80 questions in 90 minutes.  The kicker is that you’ll have to read a long passage and then answer a handful of questions about the passage.  The “easy” part here is that you don’t have to have preexisting knowledge about the works on the test.  They won’t ask you who the main character of Such-and-Such was, or who wrote a particular novel.  In short, you can walk in cold.

When you read a passage and understand it well,  you’ll probably do great on the questions that follow.  Each test is random so you may end up with “easier” passages, like those from Huckleberry Finn or Emily Dickenson.  Lucky you!  Now, the problem comes when the passage is extra long, extra technical, extra wordy, or just extra “old-fashioned.”  The problem, is now you’re faced with a handful of questions you probably won’t get right.  If your version of the exam has 12 long passages and you only really understood 4 of them, it’s not going to turn out well for you.   You really need to understand most of your passages and answer most of the questions correctly.  (It’s also possible to understand the passage and miss questions, but we’ll hope that’s not the case!)


What kind of passages?

Francis Bacon. (1561–1626). Essays, Civil and Moral.
The Harvard Classics. 1909–14.

“He that hath wife and children hath given hostages to fortune; for they are impediments to great enterprises, either of virtue or mischief. Certainly the best works, and of greatest merit for the public, have proceeded from the unmarried or childless men; which both in affection and means have married and endowed the public. Yet it were great reason that those that have children should have greatest care of future times; unto which they know they must transmit their dearest pledges. Some there are, who though they lead a single life, yet their thoughts do end with themselves, and account future times impertinences. 1Nay, there are some other that account wife and children but as bills of charges. Nay more, there are some foolish rich covetous men, that take a pride in having no children, because they may be thought so much the richer. For perhaps they have heard some talk, Such an one is a great rich man, and another except to it, Yea, but he hath a great charge of children; as if it were an abatement to his riches. But the most ordinary cause of a single life is liberty, especially in certain self-pleasing and humorous 2 minds, which are so sensible of every restraint, as they will go near to think their girdles and garters to be bonds and shackles. Unmarried men are best friends, best masters, best servants; but not always best subjects; for they are light to run away; and almost all fugitives are of that condition. A single life doth well with churchmen; for charity will hardly water the ground where it must first fill a pool. It is indifferent for judges and magistrates; for if they be facile and corrupt, you shall have a servant five times worse than a wife. For soldiers, I find the generals commonly in their hortatives put men in mind of their wives and children; and I think the despising of marriage amongst the Turks maketh the vulgar soldier more base. Certainly wife and children are a kind of discipline of humanity; and single men, though they may be many times more charitable, because their means are less exhaust, yet, on the other side, they are more cruel and hardhearted (good to make severe inquisitors), because their tenderness is not so oft called upon. Grave natures, led by custom, and therefore constant, are commonly loving husbands, as was said of Ulysses, vetulam suam prætulit immortalitati [he preferred his old wife to immortality]. Chaste women are often proud and froward, as presuming upon the merit of their chastity. It is one of the best bonds both of chastity and obedience in the wife, if she think her husband wise; which she will never do if she find him jealous. Wives are young men’s mistresses; companions for middle age; and old men’s nurses. So as a man may have a quarrel 3 to marry when he will. But yet he 4 was reputed one of the wise men, that made answer to the question, when a man should marry,—A young man not yet, an elder man not at all. It is often seen that bad husbands have very good wives; whether it be that it raiseth the price of their husband’s kindness when it comes; or that the wives take a pride in their patience. But this never fails, if the bad husbands were of their own choosing, against their friends’ consent; for then they will be sure to make good their own folly.”


Are you exhausted?  Was that ok?  How would your teen do with that?  Is the essay content too mature?  This passage is a good representation of this exam.  If your teen hasn’t read classic literature, this exam will give him trouble.   If your teen is a slow reader, this exam will give him trouble.  If your teen zones out after a half hour of hard reading, this exam will give him trouble.  This exam asks 80 questions and allows 90 minutes.   If 1/2 – 3/4 that time is spent reading, they’re left with only about 15-20 seconds per question.

When I took this exam, I felt my mind starting to wander somewhere around the first hour.  It took a lot of focus to get through the last questions, and toward the end, I was simply “pushing through and hoping for the best.”  My husband’s experience with this CLEP exam was enough of a turn off that he didn’t want to attempt any others after this one.  He told me his last 20 or so questions were all marked “B” because it seemed like a good choice- he just wanted to get through it.   My 17-year-old son took this exam and hated it (but passed) and told me it was exhausting.

As to not discourage you, others find this exam really enjoyable!  I’ve asked our Minnesota Homeschooling for College Credit group leader Jenny Bergren to share some words about her daughter’s experience with this exam.  She took it a couple months back and had a great experience.

My daughter just took and passed her first CLEP- Analyzing and Interpreting Literature. She got a 65 and found it to be easy. She even finished 25 minutes early. 

Regarding her daughter’s background:

She’s my reader and poetry writer. I expected it to be easy for her because this subject is her strength. She already knew how to understand and analyze literature before she started studying. She does it for fun!   

Regarding her daughter’s prep for the exam:

She went through the Modern States course to get the free voucher but the only thing she learned was a few terms. She did say the practice tests were a lot harder than the real test. She scored abysmally on the second practice test (29 right out of 80?).

How it went:

I told her not to worry because I’m taking her to Chick-fil-A whether she passes or not. 😉 She wouldn’t talk about what was on the test specifically because she said you have to agree not to. But she did say she enjoyed the passages that she read.

Anything else?

When I asked her what was the most helpful in preparing for the test she said the chapter in your book regarding taking a test. She was so glad that she had read the part about not canceling the test score because they ask you repeatedly. Not that she wanted to. But when they ask you more than once it makes you feel like you are doing something wrong!

Thanks for that feedback Jenny!


Is this the easiest exam? 

About 75% of those who take it WILL PASS.


Analyzing and Interpreting Literature

Overview

The Analyzing and Interpreting Literature exam covers material usually taught in a general undergraduate course in literature. Although the exam does not require familiarity with specific works, it does assume that test takers have read widely and perceptively in poetry, drama, fiction, and nonfiction. The questions are based on passages supplied in the test. These passages have been selected so that no previous experience with them is required to answer the questions. The passages are taken primarily from American and British literature.

The exam contains approximately 80 multiple-choice questions to be answered in 98 minutes. Some of these are pretest questions that will not be scored. Any time test takers spend taking tutorials and providing personal information is added to actual testing time.

An optional essay section can be taken in addition to the multiple-choice test. The essay section requires that two essays be written during a total time of 90 minutes. For the first essay, candidates are asked to analyze a short poem. For the second essay, candidates are asked to apply a generalization about literature (such as the function of a theme or a technique) to a novel, short story, or play that they have read.

Candidates are expected to write well-organized essays in clear and precise prose. The essay section is scored by faculty at the institution that requests it and is still administered in paper-and-pencil format. There is an additional fee for taking this section, payable to the institution that administers the exam.

Knowledge and Skills Required

Questions on the Analyzing and Interpreting Literature exam require test takers to demonstrate the following abilities.

  • Ability to read prose, poetry, and drama with understanding
  • Ability to analyze the elements of a literary passage and to respond to nuances of meaning, tone, imagery, and style
  • Ability to interpret metaphors, to recognize rhetorical and stylistic devices, to perceive relationships between parts and wholes, and to grasp a speaker’s or author’s attitudes
  • Knowledge of the means by which literary effects are achieved
  • Familiarity with the basic terminology used to discuss literary texts

The exam emphasizes comprehension, interpretation, and analysis of literary works. A specific knowledge of historical context (authors and movements) is not required, but a broad knowledge of literature gained through reading widely and a familiarity with basic literary terminology is assumed. The following outline indicates the relative emphasis given to the various types of literature and the periods from which the passages are taken. The approximate percentage of exam questions per classification is noted within each main category.

Genre

35%–45% Poetry
35%–45% Prose (fiction and nonfiction)
15%–30% Drama

National Tradition

50%–65% British Literature
30%–45% American Literature
5%–15% Works in translation

Period

3%–7% Classical and pre-Renaissance
20%–30% Renaissance and 17th Century
35%–45% 18th and 19th Centuries
25%–35% 20th and 21st Centuries


Score Information

Credit-Granting Score for Analyzing and Interpreting Literature

ACE Recommended Score*: 50
Semester Hours: 3

Each institution reserves the right to set its own credit-granting policy, which may differ from that of ACE. Contact your college as soon as possible to find out the score it requires to grant credit, the number of credit hours granted, and the course(s) that can be bypassed with a satisfactory score.

*The American Council on Education’s College Credit Recommendation Service (ACE CREDIT) has evaluated CLEP processes and procedures for developing, administering, and scoring the exams. The score listed above is equivalent to a grade of C in the corresponding course. The American Council on Education, the major coordinating body for all the nation’s higher education institutions, seeks to provide leadership and a unifying voice on key higher education issues and to influence public policy through advocacy, research, and program initiatives. Visit the ACE CREDIT website for more information.


Study Resources for Learning to Read Literature

The most relevant preparation for the Analyzing and Interpreting Literature exam is attentive and reflective reading of the various literary genres of poetry, drama, and prose.

You can prepare for the exam by:

  • Reading a variety of poetry, drama, fiction, and nonfiction
  • Reading critical analyses of various literary works
  • Writing analyses and interpretations of the works you read
  • Discussing with others the meaning of the literature you read

K12 Curriculum

When I taught my own teens how to analyze literature, some of it was organic and spontaneous, but I really enjoyed the way Teaching the Classics (IEW – Adam and Missy Andrews) gave me tools to facilitate analysis in a homeschool setting.  If you use their product, you’ll want the DVD and workbook, but you can use it with all your children.

Textbooks

Textbooks and anthologies used for college courses in the analysis and interpretation of literature contain a sampling of literary works in a variety of genres. They also contain material that can help you comprehend the meanings of literary works and recognize the devices writers use to convey their sense and intent. To prepare for the exam, you should study the contents of at least one textbook or anthology, which you can find in most college bookstores. You would do well to consult two or three texts because they do vary somewhat in content, approach, and emphases.

A recent survey conducted by CLEP found that the following textbooks (first author listed only) are among those used by college faculty who teach the equivalent course. You might find one or more of these online or at your local college bookstore. HINT: Look at the table of contents first to make sure it matches the knowledge and skills required for this exam.

Abcarian, Literature: The Human Experience (Bedford/St. Martin’s)
Arp and Johnson, Perrine’s Literature: Structure, Sound, and Sense (W.W. Norton)
Booth, Norton Introduction to Literature (W.W. Norton)
DiYanni, Literature: Approaches to Fiction, Poetry, and Drama (McGraw-Hill)

Literature Resources:

Luminarium Anthology of English Literature
Bartleby.com Great Books Online
Voice of the Shuttle Literature (in English)

Online Classes:

A fully online free course offered by Harvard via the edX partnership Modern Masterpieces of World Literature  (they have others too, even for poetry!)

Study.com has a CLEP Analyzing and Interpreting course.  Homeschool Buyer’s CO-OP just added a 3-month subscription option (you used to have to buy a whole year if you wanted a discount) that is 25% off.

The Great Courses Plus  (think: Netflix for streaming educational content) has a number of literature courses, but the one you’ll want to look at is called Life Lessons from The Great Books.  They spend a great deal of time analyzing and interpreting the type of literature on this exam!  (First month is usually free)

 Free online CLEP course by Modern States Education Alliance    Modern States is a free online class with little checkpoints after each lesson.  If you complete their entire course, they will give you a voucher to take a FREE CLEP EXAM.  We have had dozens of parents report back to me that they’ve done this with MULTIPLE exams, not just one, and one mom even told me they paid her proctoring fee!  We don’t know when this program offer will expire, but until then, get your free exam! 



After Learning to Read Literature….Test Prep

For test prep and practice tests:  The best CLEP prep book on the market for this exam is the  REA Analyzing and Interpreting Literature.  You’ll notice I linked you to the older version- you can pick it up for about $4 on Amazon, and it has much better reviews!  You *can get a new version too (about $30), since both include practice tests in the back that explain “why” an answer is right or wrong, I HIGHLY recommend it in one form or another.  You can also check your local library!

Literature Guides:

(Secular) Sparks Notes are a modern version of the old yellow and black CliffsNotes.  You’ll be impressed with their catalog of about a zillion titles – also quizzes, essays, and everything you need to analyze any major literary work.  Did I mention these are free?

(Christian) Progeny Literature Guides are also like Cliffs Notes but from a Christian worldview.  Homeschool Buyer’s CO-OP has 30% off sale for members (free to become a member) and flat $5 shipping.  They sell the guides in 3-pack bundles. These are available electronically or paperback (am I the only one that still loves paper!?). For a sense of scope, a 3-pack would cover 3 books, consistent with 1 semester of high school.

Literary Terms:

This exam slips in literary terms that your teen needs to be aware of.  For instance, they might ask about a story’s mood or tone.  They might ask which passage best-demonstrated satire or foreshadowing.  I suggest using flashcards to memorize the vocabulary.  You don’t need to learn hundreds of terms, but the popular terms will certainly appear.

Cyber English literary terms page has the best free list I’ve seen in a while!

InstantCert has an online flashcard study program and a Specific Exam Resource file where members share feedback about the exam in real time.  Use code 100150 to get $5 off the $20 cost.

A fully online free course offered by Harvard via the edX partnership Modern Masterpieces of World Literature  (they have others too, even for poetry!)

The Great Courses Plus  (think: Netflix for streaming educational content) has a number of literature courses, but the one you’ll want to look at is called Life Lessons from The Great Books.  They spend a great deal of time analyzing and interpreting the type of literature on this exam!  (First month is usually free)

Not Shmoop

If you’re looking for more opportunities to earn college credit studying literature, you’re going to stumble upon Shmoop.  They have several ACE CREDIT® recommended literature courses.  I bring this up because besides the 3 CLEP literature exams (American, English, Analyzing and Interpreting Literature) no one has more college credit options for literature than Shmoop, and it’s a popular recommendation in the very large college credit forum Instantcert.  However, Shmoop is having small problems that may indicate bigger problems for their brand.   On 5/4/2018 Thomas Edison State College announced that they will no longer accept Shmoop courses. This is noteworthy because Thomas Edison is used by many members here, and TESU generally accepts *all* companies that are ACE evaluated for credit.  Later, on 5/23/2018, Shmoop sent out emails to those sites that are affiliated with their college credit programs to stop distributing links.  As such, to protect our members here, we won’t be linking you to this program, despite it holding ACE status at the time of this post.  My recommendation is to choose a different brand until such time that they’ve gotten approval full and clear.

  • American Literature
  • Classical Literature
  • Foundations of Literature
  • Literature in the Media
  • Shakespeare’s Plays
  • Women’s Literature
  • The Bible as Literature
  • Contemporary Literature
  • Holocaust Literature
  • Introduction to Poetry
  • Modernist Literature
  • Victorian Literature
  • British Literature
  • Drugs in Literature
  • Introduction to Drama
  • Literature 101
  • Shakespeare in Context
  • Western Literature

book boy

Posted in CLEP, Sociology

CLEP Psychology

Official CLEP Psychology Page

The Psychology exam is a great first CLEP for your teen.  The content is manageable in a semester and is a great 1/2 credit elective for high school students that can yield 3 college credits.  Note- for teens applying to competitive colleges, you may instead want to consider The College Board’s other exam product:  Advanced Placement

Already confused? watch my “What is CLEP?” video

What is psychology?  It is the academic study of the human mind and its functions, especially those affecting behavior.

cautionCLEP at home -vs- COLLEGE ENROLLMENT

Topics like sexual development, sexuality, gender roles, and mental health are always included in a basic Psychology 101 course -these are areas you probably want to oversee with your minor teen at this age.  College courses are based on the premise that the attendees are adults, so no consideration is given to your teen’s age.  Choosing a “more conservative” or “more liberal” college doesn’t assure that the teacher’s opinions will match yours.  As a parent, it is my opinion that your minor teen (under age 18) learn this content at home with you, and take the CLEP exam as opposed to as a dual enrollment college course with an instructor/professor.  

If you want simple:  select a college textbook and simply have your teen read it.  That will cover the curriculum.  You’ll want to follow learning with some test prep and maybe a few practice tests.  In our home, I consistently use a layering technique to teach my children subjects that will also be part of a CLEP exam.  I like to include documentaries, homework, field trips, research papers and the like- but how deep you dive is really up to you.  I put a video on youtube explaining how to layer resources.

For the curious, I took this exam March 2007 and earned a score of 64.  Jennifer Cook-DeRosa



Introductory Psychology

Overview

The Introductory Psychology exam covers material that is usually taught in a one-semester undergraduate introductory course in psychology. It stresses basic facts, concepts, and generally accepted principles in history; approaches and methods of psychology; biological bases of behavior, sensation, and perception; states of consciousness; learning; cognition; motivation and emotion; personality; psychological disorders and treatment; social psychology; and statistics, tests, and measurements.

The exam contains approximately 95 questions to be answered in 90 minutes. Some of these are pretest questions that will not be scored. Any time test takers spend on tutorials and providing personal information is in addition to the actual testing time.

The questions on the CLEP Introductory Psychology exam adhere to the terminology, criteria, and classifications referred to in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5).

Knowledge and Skills Required

Questions on the Introductory Psychology exam require test takers to demonstrate one or more of the following abilities.

  • Knowledge of terminology, principles, and theory
  • Ability to comprehend, evaluate, and analyze problem situations
  • Ability to apply knowledge to new situations

The subject matter of the Introductory Psychology exam is drawn from the following topics. The percentages next to the main topics indicate the approximate percentage of exam questions on that topic.

History, Approaches, Methods (8–9%)

  • History of psychology
  • Approaches: biological, behavioral, cognitive, humanistic, psychodynamic
  • Research methods: experimental, clinical, correlational
  • Ethics in research

Biological Bases of Behavior (8–9%)

  • Endocrine system
  • Etiology
  • Functional organization of the nervous system
  • Genetics
  • Neuroanatomy
  • Physiological techniques

Sensation and Perception (7–8%)

  • Attention
  • Other senses: somesthesis, olfaction, gestation, vestibular system
  • Perceptual development
  • Perceptual processes
  • Receptor processes: vision, audition
  • Sensory mechanisms: thresholds, adaptation

States of Consciousness (5–6%)

  • Hypnosis and meditation
  • Psychoactive drug effects
  • Sleep and dreaming

Learning (10–11%)

  • Biological bases
  • Classical conditioning
  • Cognitive process in learning
  • Observational learning
  • Operant conditioning

Cognition (8–9%)

  • Intelligence and creativity
  • Language
  • Memory
  • Thinking and problem solving

Motivation and Emotion (7–8%)

  • Biological bases
  • Hunger, thirst, sex, pain
  • Social motivation
  • Theories of emotion
  • Theories of motivation

Developmental Psychology (8–9%)

  • Dimensions of development: physical, cognitive, social, moral
  • Gender identity and sex roles
  • Heredity-environment issues
  • Research methods: longitudinal, cross-sectional
  • Theories of development

Personality (7–8%)

  • Assessment techniques
  • Growth and adjustment
  • Personality theories and approaches
  • Research methods: idiographic, nomothetic
  • Self-concept, self-esteem

Psychological disorders and health (8–9%)

  • Affective disorders
  • Anxiety disorders
  • Dissociative disorders
  • Health, stress, and coping
  • Personality disorders
  • Psychoses
  • Somatoform disorders
  • Theories of psychopathology

Treatment of psychological disorders (7–8%)

  • Behavioral therapies
  • Biological and drug therapies
  • Cognitive therapies
  • Community and preventive approaches
  • Insight therapies: psychodynamic and humanistic approaches

Social Psychology (7–8%)

  • Aggression/antisocial behavior
  • Attitudes and attitude change
  • Attribution processes
  • Conformity, compliance, obedience
  • Group dynamics
  • Interpersonal perception

Statistics, Tests, and Measurement (3–4%)

  • Descriptive statistics
  • Inferential statistics
  • Measurement of intelligence
  • Reliability and validity
  • Samples, populations, norms
  • Types of tests

Study Resources

Most textbooks used in college-level introductory psychology courses cover the topics in the outline given earlier, but the approaches to certain topics and the emphases given to them may differ. To prepare for the Introductory Psychology exam, it is advisable to study one or more college textbooks, which can be found in most college bookstores. When selecting a textbook, check the table of contents against the knowledge and skills required for this test. You may also find it helpful to supplement your reading with books listed in the bibliographies that can be found in most psychology textbooks.

K12 Curriculum

Homeschool Buyer’s Co-op is offering 25% off HMH Psychology Curriculum a secular high school level full curriculum.

Textbooks

A survey conducted by CLEP found that the following textbooks are among those used by college faculty who teach the equivalent course. You might purchase one or more of these online or at your local college bookstore.

Online Resources

These resources, compiled by the CLEP test development committee and staff members, may help you study for your exam. However, none of these sources are designed specifically to provide preparation for a CLEP exam. The College Board has no control over their content and cannot vouch for accuracy.

Score Information

Credit Granting Score for Introductory Psychology

ACE Recommended Score*: 50
Semester Hours: 3

Each institution reserves the right to set its own credit-granting policy, which may differ from that of ACE. Contact your college as soon as possible to find out the score it requires to grant credit, the number of credit hours granted, and the course(s) that can be bypassed with a satisfactory score.



Homeschooling for College Credit Recommends…

This free online Psychology 101 textbook is very well organized and easy to use.  It might be a good place for a parent to do a little background reading before getting started.

An excellent free video series Discovering Psychology by Annenberg Media to round out your psychology curriculum.

You can buy workbooks to go along with most subjects [Annenberg Media]. Give them a call. They have sent me any samples. -Stephanie J from Facebook

The best CLEP prep book on the market for this exam is the REA CLEP Psychology Guide (2nd edition).  It includes practice tests in the back that explain “why” an answer is right or wrong.  HIGHLY recommended.  Two different parents confirmed my experience using this book.

I used the REA second edition for the CLEP Introductory Psychology exam and she scored a 71.  -homeschooling parent from Illinois

One of my kids passed it with no background after studying only the REA book. -homeschooling dad from Texas

A fully online free course offered by St. Margaret’s Episcopal School via the edX partnership Psychology 101

A fully online free course offered by University of Toronto via the Coursera partnership Psychology 101

A fully online free course offered by MIT via the Open Courseware partnership Psychology 101

Free CLEP Prep has a study guide and a practice exam for this test!

InstantCert has an online flashcard study program and a Specific Exam Resource file where members share feedback about the exam in real time.  Use code 100150 to get $5 off the $20 cost.  *If you drop by, be sure to say hello!  I’m a daily contributing member there under the username Cookderosa.  

We used these last year when my daughter took psychology. She found the videos interesting. -Katrinka G from Facebook

 

Saylor Academy offers a completely free Psychology 101 online course. They offer an exam that awards college credit for $25, however, their exam is only worth 2 credits, whereas the CLEP exam is worth 3 credits.

The Modern States organization offers a completely free Psychology 101 video-based online course. As a bonus, they are currently issuing vouchers to take the CLEP exam for FREE to anyone who asks.  Reducing your CLEP cost to $0? Yes, please!

Crash Course Psychology is youtube based accelerated study series, and a good review tool!

My 17 year old daughter just passed the Psychology test with a score of 61. -Texas homeschool parent

Sparks Notes Psychology Study Guide is a free online note site that outlines all the major aspects of psychology.

If you’re looking for something on paper, I love laminated study charts like the one in this photo.  I have a ton of them covering about a dozen subjects.  You can almost always get them for under ten bucks, and they will outline and zero in on all the major topics/dates/names/etc. for the subject without fluff.   Psychology Quick Reference Guide

 

Content Clusters

A study strategy commonly used to make the most of learning includes forming “content clusters” and taking multiple exams that cover the same topics.  Psychology is a good subject for forming a content cluster because it is covered on more than one CLEP exam. These are separate exams that yield separate credits so a successful content cluster in psychology can reward big returns.

These 3 CLEP exams will share psychology content to some extent:

Introductory Psychology

Human Growth and Development (note that the DSST exam called Lifespan Developmental Psychology is considered the same exam by colleges, so do not add that exam to your cluster!  They won’t award credit for both)

Introduction to Educational Psychology

The DSST exam Fundamentals of Counseling doesn’t count as a psychology credit at most colleges, however, it does have its foundation in psychology and would be an added bonus if your teen is interested in pursuing fields in counseling, teaching, child development, or social work.

 

 

 


Affiliate links are may be included in this post where applicable.  Making your purchase using an affiliate link does not change the price you pay for something, but keeps this site alive and ad-free.    

Posted in CLEP, Sociology

CLEP Sociology

Official CLEP Sociology Page

The Sociology exam is a great first CLEP for your teen.  The content is manageable in a semester and is a great 1/2 credit elective for high school students that can yield 3 college credits.

Already confused? watch my “What is CLEP?” video

What is sociology?  It is the academic study of the development, structure, and function of a human society and its problems.  

cautionThis CLEP at home -vs- COLLEGE ENROLLMENT

Topics like marriage, family, gender roles, politics, and poverty are always included in a basic Sociology 101 course -these are areas you probably want to oversee with your minor teen at this age.  College courses are based on the premise that the attendees are adults, so no consideration is given to your teen’s age.  Choosing a “more conservative” or “more liberal” college doesn’t assure that the teacher’s opinions will match yours.  As a parent, it is my opinion that your minor teen (under age 18) learn this content at home with you, and take the CLEP exam as opposed to as a dual enrollment college course with an instructor/professor.  

If you want simple:  select a college textbook and simply have your teen read it.  That will cover the curriculum.  You’ll want to follow learning with some test prep and maybe a few practice tests.  In our home, I consistently use a layering technique to teach my children subjects that will also be part of a CLEP exam.  I like to include documentaries, homework, field trips, research papers and the like- but how deep you dive is really up to you.  I put a video on youtube explaining how to layer resources.

For the curious, I took this exam Feburary 2007 and earned a score of 65.  Jennifer Cook-DeRosa



Introductory Sociology

Overview

The Introductory Sociology exam is designed to assess an individual’s knowledge of the material typically presented in a one-semester introductory-level sociology course at most colleges and universities. The examination emphasizes basic facts and concepts as well as general theoretical approaches used by sociologists on the topics of institutions, social patterns, social processes, social stratifications, and the sociological perspective. Highly-specialized knowledge of the subject and the methodology of the discipline is not required or measured by the test content.

The exam contains approximately 100 questions to be answered in 90 minutes. Some of these are pretest questions that will not be scored. Any time test takers spend on tutorials and providing personal information is in addition to the actual testing time.

Knowledge and Skills Required

Questions on the Introductory Sociology exam require test takers to demonstrate one or more of the following abilities. Some questions may require more than one of these abilities.

  • Identification of specific names, facts, and concepts from sociological literature
  • Understanding of relationships between concepts, empirical generalizations, and theoretical propositions of sociology
  • Understanding of the methods by which sociological relationships are established
  • Application of concepts, propositions, and methods to hypothetical situations
  • Interpretation of tables and charts

The subject matter of the Introductory Sociology exam is drawn from the following topics. The percentages next to the main topics indicate the approximate percentage of exam questions on that topic.

Institutions (20%)

  • Economic
  • Educational
  • Family
  • Medical
  • Political
  • Religious

Social Patterns (10%)

  • Community
  • Demography
  • Human ecology
  • Rural/urban patterns

Social Processes (25%)

  • Collective behavior and social movements
  • Culture
  • Deviance and social control
  • Groups and organizations
  • Social change
  • Social interaction
  • Socialization

Social Stratification (Process and Structure) (25%)

  • Aging
  • Power and social inequality
  • Professions and occupations
  • Race and ethnic relations
  • Sex and gender roles
  • Social class
  • Social mobility

The Sociological Perspective (20%)

  • History of sociology
  • Methods
  • Sociological theory

Study Resources

As you read sociology textbooks, take notes that address the following issues which are fundamental to most questions that appear on the test:

  • What is society? What is culture? What is common to all societies, and what is characteristic of American society?
  • What are other basic concepts in sociology that help to describe human nature, human interaction, and the collective behavior of groups, organizations, institutions, and societies?
  • What methods do sociologists use to study, describe, analyze, and observe human behavior?

I watched a whole series of videos on YouTube from Crash Course – very helpful!! – 17-year-old teen from Ohio

K12 Curriculum

Homeschool Buyer’s Co-op is offering 25% off HMH Sociology Curriculum a secular high school level full curriculum.

Textbooks

A survey conducted by CLEP found that the following textbooks are among those used by college faculty who teach the equivalent course. You might purchase one or more of these online or at your local college bookstore.

Score Information

Credit Granting Score for Introductory Sociology

ACE Recommended Score*: 50
Semester Hours: 3

Each institution reserves the right to set its own credit-granting policy, which may differ from that of ACE. Contact your college as soon as possible to find out the score it requires to grant credit, the number of credit hours granted, and the course(s) that can be bypassed with a satisfactory score.


This was definitely harder than I anticipated.  – 14-year-old homeschooled teen from Texas


Homeschooling for College Credit Recommends…

The best CLEP prep book on the market for this exam is the REA CLEP Sociology Guide.  It includes practice tests in the back that explain “why” an answer is right or wrong.  HIGHLY recommended.

Free CLEP Prep has a study guide and a practice exam for this test!

InstantCert has an online flashcard study program and a Specific Exam Resource file where members share feedback about the exam in real time.  Use code 100150 to get $5 off the $20 cost.  *If you drop by, be sure to say hello!  I’m a daily contributing member there under the username Cookderosa.  

I scored a 59 on the CLEP exam today.  -16-year-old Homeschool teen from Iowa

Free online Sociology course through Arizona State University (non-credit) but can serve as your curriculum.

Free online VIDEO based Sociology course through New York University (non-credit) but can serve as your curriculum.

Saylor Academy offers a completely free Sociology 101 online course. They offer an exam that awards college credit for $25, however since their exam is only worth 1 credit, whereas the CLEP exam is worth 3 credits.

The Modern States organization offers a completely free Sociology 101 video-based online course. As a bonus, they are currently issuing vouchers to take the CLEP exam for FREE to anyone who asks.  Reducing your CLEP cost to $0? Yes, please!

Crash Course Sociology is youtube based accelerated study series, and a good review tool!

Sparks Notes Sociology Study Guide is a free online note site that outlines all the major aspects of sociology

 

If you’re looking for something on paper I love laminated study charts like the one in this photo.  I have a ton of them covering about a dozen subjects.  You can almost always get them for under ten bucks, and they will outline and zero in on all the major topics/dates/names/etc. for the subject without fluff.   Sociology Quick Reference Guide

 

 

My 17-year-old daughter passed Intro to Sociology today with a 58! -Texas parent