Posted in CLEP, College Admission

10 RA Christian Colleges that Accept CLEP

Colleges / Universities on this list are listed in no special order, but are all Regionally Accredited (RA) and have a public CLEP policy (meaning I can find it in one of their publications.)  You can look up colleges using the same tools I use:

(1) Accreditation U.S. Department of Education Accreditation Database

(2)  Search “CLEP” on the College’s website.

Regional accreditation is very important when choosing a dual enrollment college *during high school*  because credit earned at a non-RA college credit rarely transfers into RA colleges.  After your teen graduates high school, choosing an RA or non-RA college is a matter of career direction and personal preference.  Examples of careers that require an RA degree are generally those that require a state-issued license:  Nurse, Medical Doctor, Physician Assistant, Lawyer, CPA, Dietitian, Psychologist, K-12 Teacher, Social Worker, etc.  or that require a master’s degree or higher.  Non-RA college attendance is discouraged on this site as a general policy.

 


1. College of the Ozarks

P.O.Box 17
Point Lookout, MO 65726
Phone: 417-334-6411
http://www.cofo.edu

College of the Ozarks CLEP Policy

Fun fact:  Students here do not pay tuition!  


2. Liberty University

1971 University Blvd
Lynchburg, VA 24502
Phone: 434-582-2000
http://www.liberty.edu

Liberty University CLEP Policy

Fun fact:  This is the largest Christian university in the world!


3.  Eastern Nazarene College

23 E Elm Ave
Quincy, MA 02170-2999
Phone: 617-745-3000
http://www.enc.edu

Eastern Nazarene College CLEP Policy

Fun fact:  All children of pastors or missionaries receive a $5000 grant each year.


 

4.  Texas Christian University

2800 S University Dr
Fort Worth, TX 76129
Phone: 817-257-7000
http://www.tcu.edu

Texas Christian College CLEP Policy

Fun fact:  Accumulating 30 CLEP credits will save $58,000 at this college.


5.  Bob Jones University

1700 Wade Hampton Boulevard
Greenville, SC 29614
Phone: 864-242-5100
http://www.bju.edu

Bob Jones University CLEP Policy

Fun fact:  High school students can take online dual enrollment courses at 50% tuition.


6.  Northwest University

5520 108th Ave NE
Kirkland, WA 98083-0579
Phone: 425-822-8266
http://www.northwestu.edu

Northwest University CLEP Policy

Fun fact: High school students can earn an Associate degree in Ministry Leadership online. 


7.  Biola University

13800 Biola Ave
La Mirada, CA 90639-0001
Phone: 562-903-6000
http://www.biola.edu

Biola University CLEP Policy

Fun fact:  Students can apply up to 32 CLEP credits toward their degree. 


8.  Cedarville University

251 N. Main Street
Cedarville, OH 45314-0601
Phone: 937-766-2211
http://www.cedarville.edu

Cedarville University CLEP Policy

Fun fact:  High school students can take online dual enrollment courses for $150 per credit (free through PSEO for Ohio residents).


9.  Oklahoma Christian University

P.O. Box 11000
Oklahoma City, OK 73013-1100
Phone: 405-425-5000
http://www.oc.edu

Oklahoma Christian University CLEP Policy

Fun fact:  Average student teacher ratio is 13:1


10.  Oral Roberts University

7777 S Lewis
Tulsa, OK 74171
Phone: 918-495-6161
http://www.oru.edu

Oral Roberts University CLEP Policy

Fun fact:  Students can complete 60 credits (50% of their degree) by CLEP and AP!


 

Posted in College Admission, Community college, Dual Enrollment, Uncategorized

Community College in the News

NPR Want to Finish College?

Did anyone read The Center for Community College Student Engagement Report 2017? Maybe not, but you may have read about it on NPR’s website this morning.  If you have the time, you can read the quick summary linked above.  I’m going to take a moment and share my thoughts, which I think other Homeschooling for College Credit parents may find useful.

“Center for Community College Student Engagement demonstrates that students who enroll full-time in community colleges fare better than their part-time counterparts…50 percent of always-full-time students earned an associate degree or certificate. In contrast, only 23 percent of always-part-time students complete their degrees.”

The community college was my employer for 18 years.  I worked for the largest district in the state of Iowa, first as a department chair and administrator, and later when I started homeschooling, as a community college teacher.  Some of you may remember reading in Homeschooling for College Credit, that I was confused by the lack of love for the community college system- it serves a lot of people from all walks of life.  In fact, if you’ve followed our Facebook Group, you know that I have a lot of great things to say about the community college as a system.  That being said…..

The community colleges seem a little out of touch lately with their role in the education industry and seem to be having a bit of an identity crisis.

“Probably for over a decade now, there’s been a lot of conversation about getting more students to complete community college,” says Evelyn Waiwaiole, executive director for the Center for Community College Student Engagement at the University of Texas at Austin. “While attending full-time will be unrealistic for every student, we need to think about why always-part-time students are having a qualitatively different experience and push for changes to be made.”

Here’s what she didn’t say- community college completion rates are somewhere around 8-12% depending on what source you reference. These rates make upper administration lose their minds- and I get it, they want to see higher numbers like those of a 4-year college (about 50-65% which is still pretty low), but what if they’re worried about the wrong thing?  Not everyone uses the community college to earn an Associate of Arts degree!

Community colleges serve a purpose.  They are open enrollment, which is to say that no matter your academic ability, they’ll let you sign up to learn something.  Whether you take courses for credit or personal enrichment, you’re allowed to register.  If you don’t have the required credentials or prerequisite test scores to take certain courses, they’ll provide those too.  Community colleges provide an avenue to earn a GED as well as many quick-employment certificates that can lead to immediate job training.  IN ADDITION, they also award Associate degrees.  

degree

It is my opinion that upper administration has lost sight of their role in our community, and has really started to push for all their students to earn an Associate degree.  Yet, an Associate degree doesn’t always transfer to a 4-year college (depends on your state) and an Associate degree isn’t always an efficient route to a career (ex. Real Estate License requires completing a course, not a degree) and an Associate degree is usually full of general education courses- the very courses students complain about.

The report and summary go on to argue that when students attend full time vs part time, that they’re more likely to complete a degree (this shouldn’t shock anyone) so we should encourage all students to attend full time!  This was the best-dressed marketing effort I’ve read this year.  Of course, colleges want your student to attend full time, of course, they do.  You don’t need an economics lesson from me to tell you why community colleges want to increase their enrollment or why 4-year colleges think you should skip community college and head right to their front door.

EVERYONE is fighting for your student and the dollars they bring. EVERYONE wants enrollment.

So, what does this mean for homeschooling families who want to know where the community college fits into their high school?  I want to point out some reasons that I think the community college is worth your consideration.  This isn’t an apologetics piece, but it’s not a criticism either- it’s simply my thoughts and opinion on how to use the community college in high school and after graduation.


 

For homeschooled high school teens:

  1. DUAL ENROLLMENT.  It’s the community college is the most likely college to allow dual enrollment participation for your teen.  While a few private colleges offer this option, but those programs tend to have competitive admissions or restrictive summer programs.  Community college dual enrollment allows full semester enrollment that awards college credit alongside the high school credit awarded by the parent.
  2. VARIETY:  Dual enrollment through the community college is broader than that of a 4-year college, and includes liberal arts as well as career and trade occupational courses- reflective of the kinds of degree programs offered at the college.
  3.  NON-CREDIT:  The community college closest to you offers a nice catalog of non-credit options.  These are perfectly compatible with homeschooling and can be used as a full curriculum.  Best of all, non-credit options do not require the student to “apply” to the college, rather they simply “register” for the course.  Examples you’ll probably find locally include full sequences of foreign languages, computer programs, and even those that lead to licensure or certifications (property management, real estate, nursing assistant, EMT, and others)  The entrance requirement is usually “age 16” however exceptions can sometimes be made.
  4. TUITION BREAKS:  Some states have community college (or public 4-year college) funding that allows high school students to take courses for free or reduced tuition.  Call your local community college to see if your state has this program.
  5. DISTANCE LEARNING:  Community colleges have really embraced distance learning and a number Homeschooling for College Credit families use community colleges from all over the country.  In other words, you can live in any state and take advantage of the super-low tuition offered through New Mexico’s community college system (about $40/credit).
  6. TESTING CENTER:  If you’re looking for a CLEP or DSST testing center, it’s probably at your community college.  Typically, community colleges have lower proctoring fees than the 4-year colleges.
  7. TRANSFER-FRIENDLY:  Universities in your state almost always all dual enrollment and summer credit earned in high school to transfer to their university.  If they don’t, it’s probably because they don’t accept transfer credit as a general policy, not because of the community college.
  8. PRESERVING FRESHMAN SCHOLARSHIPS:  Credit earned while enrolled in high school almost never counts “against” freshman status, leaving your teen eligible for freshman scholarships.  Typically, the credit earned during high school is applied once the student is already enrolled and sometimes after completion of the first semester.  In other words, they enroll as a freshman, and after 1 semester may be bumped to a sophomore or junior.
  9. HIGHER LEVEL COURSES:  If your teen finishes calculus or French 4 by sophomore year in high school, you’re probably going to have a hard time locating a suitable higher level course.  For those students, it makes sense to enroll in the community college and access no only college credit, but classes at a higher level.

For homeschool graduates:

  1. OPEN ENROLLMENT:  The community college will enroll your homeschool graduate.  The entire “college application process” can be removed from your equation, and your teen can simply register for classes.  In the case of not meeting a certain benchmark for a certain class, the community college will provide a pathway to make it happen.  For instance, if your teen never finished Algebra 1, never took the SAT, and struggles through math, they can still enroll.  There are no essays, interviews, SAT scores, letters of reference, etc.  The college welcomes all students and places them in the level they need, even if the level is lower than “college level.”
  2. TRANSCRIPT ACCEPTANCE:  You can be sure that your homeschool transcript will be accepted at your community college.
  3. LAST MINUTE ENROLLMENT:  Applying a year ahead of enrollment is great if you have a target college in mind, but community colleges allow application and enrollment even through the first week of classes- assuming there is space.
  4. ENTRANCE TESTING:  The majority of community colleges offer their own entrance test at no charge.  This test, taken on your own schedule, is to assess writing, reading, and math level.  There is no way to “fail” this test, though doing well is obviously better for your student.  Students who have taken high school tests like ACT or SAT can sometimes use those in place of entrance testing.
  5. CLEP/AP/DSST AWARDS:  The majority of community colleges award college credit by exam for CLEP, AP, and DSST.  While policies vary, it is unusual that they would award little to nothing (if that’s the case, pick a different community college).
  6. ACCREDITATION:  Community colleges are all regionally accredited, that is the gold standard.  Note that not all 2-year colleges are community colleges and not all 4-year colleges are regionally accredited!
  7. ARTICULATION:  About half of the states have articulation agreements in place, which are formal contractual agreements between the community college and the state’s public colleges.  These agreements guarantee transfer of certificates, diplomas, degrees, or courses.  It’s also worth emphasizing that about half of the states don’t have articulation agreements, but if yours does, this is a huge bonus.
  8. GED / HIGH SCHOOL EQUIVALENCY: If your student wants a GED, prep courses and advisement are available (almost always for free) through your community college. Most community colleges offer the exam as well.  In addition, some of the new high school equivalency exams are worth 10 college credits.
  9. CERTIFICATES:  Unlike a 4-year university, community colleges have “bite-sized” programs that issue certificates or certification after as few as 1 class.  These are usually directed toward job training or a specialization (forklift certification, graphic design, etc.)  Sometimes, the classes inside of a certificate will transfer into a larger diploma or degree at the same college.
  10. TERMINAL DEGREES:  The term “terminal degree” means that the degree has an ending point, in other words, there is not education beyond the terminal degree.  Often, you’ll hear a Ph.D. referred to as a “terminal degree” because there is no degree higher, but at a community college, Associate of Applied Science and Associate of Occupational Studies are also terminal degrees.  These degrees are not intended to transfer to a 4-year college, the degree is the highest training in that industry, and at the completion of the degree, the student enters their career. Besides an AA or AS degree, almost every degree at the community college is a terminal degree.
  11. STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES:  Unlike 4-year colleges, a community college sees a huge population that needs special support.  Whether it’s simple tutoring or accommodating a diagnosed disability, the community college is excellent at serving this segment of our population.
  12. AGE LIMITS:  Community colleges serve students from age 10-100 and attending classes on campus will likely expose your teen to people of all ages.  While the 4-year colleges serve the traditionally aged student (17-22), it’s not unusual to see a huge age range in any community college classroom.  We have Homeschooling for College Credit families with very young teens taking classes (as young as 12) and as a teacher, I’ve had retired senior citizens in my classes- they were some of my best students!
  13. COST:  Community college is almost always the lowest cost option for traditional college attendance.  The average cost of tuition at a community college is $100 per credit, so an average course (3 credits) will cost you roughly $300 plus books.  While this is a lot more expensive than some of the methods we talk about here (CLEP, AP, DSST, Straighterline, Saylor, etc.) those cost saving methods are alternatives that aren’t good options for everyone.  On your basic English 101 taken on campus with an instructor, your community college is likely to be your most affordable option.  As such, you should know community colleges WANT you to stay local.  They often hike the prices beyond belief when you are out of the district or out of state.  If you can’t attend your local community college, all cost promises are off the table.
  14. PELL GRANTS = FREE TUITION:  A Pell Grant is a financial need-based grant given to eligible students who have filled out the FAFSA financial aid application.  Grants don’t have to be repaid, so if your student qualifies for a Pell Grant, it will absolutely go the farthest at your community college.  Some quick math- a full Pell Grant award in 2017 is $5,575.00  That means, if your teen qualifies and attends college full time, they should receive $5,575.00  If you divide that by the number of credits you’d complete as a full-time student in 1 year (30), you’ll get $185.83.  That means, that your student’s Pell Grant will pay full tuition if your college’s per credit rate is under $185.83!  (know that the average in-state 4-year university charges about $300 per credit, and the average private 4-year university charges about $1100 per credit!)

Referenced:  Center for Community College Student Engagement 2017 National Report

 

Posted in CLEP, College Admission, High School

We just saved $96,780

I have to share my correspondence with one of our Minnesota members. She has graciously agreed to let me post it here:

“With CLEP and PSEO (dual enrollment), I just calculated we are saving $96,780 at the University of Northwestern St. Paul.

1/3 of that is in CLEP alone: 32 credit hours, which is about $30,260. Then, two years free through dual enrollment which is another $30,260 X 2 =$60,520.  

We are saving far more money by CLEPping and dual enrollment than we could get in scholarships.  -Carol Lang Frisk


She’s not exaggerating, I pulled the numbers to share with you.  

It’s -seriously- phenomenal.  Read on…


2017–18 Tuition & Fees 

The University of Northwestern St. Paul

  1. Tuition……………………………………………..$30,260
  2. Room………………………………………………….$5,570
  3. Meal Plan……………………………………………$3,700
  4. Technology Fee……………………………………..$260
  5. Health Services Fee……………………………….$124
  6. Activity Fee……………………………………………..$150
  7. Personal Expenses** …………………………..$2,120
  8. Books & Supplies** ………………………………..$600
  9. Transportation**…………………………………….$620

TOTAL …………………………………..$43,404

 

It’s worth noting that the green items with ** indicate variable expenses you can control to some degree.  (Does anyone else think the college has under-estimated the cost of books?)  So, to be fair, let’s round down to $40,000 per year- just the cost Carol’s family will be BILLED.  

Without smart planning, Carol and her daughter may have wandered onto campus and signed up for a $160,000 degree!  Thankfully, she’ll found a way to bring that cost down closer to $40,000.


Secondary savings and benefits gained by Carol’s plan:

  • In addition to reducing tuition cost, this family will cut items #2- #9 on the list by at least two years!  She won’t have to pay the meal plans, health services fees, technology fees, etc. if she’s not there!

  • A scholarship, while saving cost, doesn’t save TIME.   Injecting college credit in high school is extra work, but it is saving this student a full 2 years off the TIME it takes to finish her degree.  

  • Graduating 2 years earlier than her peers puts her into her career 2 years earlier, thus accelerating her ability to earn a supporting salary.

  • If entering the workforce isn’t in the immediate future, she has time to travel, volunteer, serve, or attend graduate school while her peers finish their undergraduate degree.

  • If she does take out a student loan, she’ll begin repayment 2 years earlier than if she attended a full 4 years- which saves 2 years worth of interest.

  • The average in-state public college costs about $40,000 for 4 years- they’ve found a way to attend a private college for the same price.

  • Using CLEP exams allowed Carol to choose appropriate homeschool curriculum that aligned with their family values while earning college credit. 

  • Using CLEP exams allowed Carol’s daughter to move quickly through subjects she easily understood, and spend more time on those that gave her trouble. 

  • Using CLEP exams and dual enrollment allowed Carol’s family to make credit accumulation a “pay-as-you-go” situation, which is ultimately the most affordable option for many parents.


How much did they spend?  What exams did she take?


 

Carol shared that her daughter earned 45 CLEP credits, but this college only awards credit for 32.  Here’s her list, cost, and reward:

16 credits Spanish CLEP ($100)   This college awards up to 16 credits for the Spanish CLEP exam but requires the student to pass a second college based test for verification.  This will give her credit in Spanish I, II, III, and IV.  (note: most colleges award up to 9 credits)

4 credits World Religions DSST ($100)  DSST is nearly identical to CLEP.

4 credits College Composition CLEP ($100)

4 credits Western Civilization CLEP ($100) 

1 credit Here’s to Your Health DSST ($100) 

3 credit (CLEP) to be determined ($100)

TOTAL INVESTMENT:  $600


Parents who inject CLEP exams into their homeschool by using it as a “final exam” don’t really have that much extra added cost- they’re buying curriculum anyway, so the risk is in paying for an exam.  Currently, CLEP exams cost $80 but a testing center typically charges about $20 for proctoring services, so it’s safest to budget $100 per exam.

Since exams usually award 3-6 credits, the $100 investment is well worth the risk!  You’d have to fail the CLEP exam 5 or 6 times before it’s more expensive than the college class.


Have you thought about using CLEP or DSST to help offset college costs for your teen?  If so, what’s your strategy?  Do you have tips for getting the biggest bang for your buck? Share them below!


Reader D.M. sent me this lovely note:

“Hi. I just wanted to share a story with you. I have struggled to get my almost 15yo daughter interested in taking CLEP exams. This has recently changed! She is now obsessed with preparing. What has changed? She started the Dave Ramsey financial curriculum and I forwarded the blog post you wrote about Carol Lang Frisk. She is now hoping to take and pass three exams this summer. I hope this inspiration continues!” 

Posted in College Admission, High School, Self-Paced Learning

Trending: Non-College Learning

Old-School, MOOCs, Coding Bootcamps, and now MissionU

Depending on the age of your teens, your techno-savviness, and how closely you follow educational trends, some of this may already be old news…. but, hold onto your chalk, the landscape of higher education is changing, and it’s happening FAST!

Higher Education in the USA hadn’t changed much for centuries.  That’s no exaggeration.  First, we had Harvard (1636), and then about a hundred years later we had a few public universities, and then almost two hundred years later we got our first community college (Joliet Jr. College in Illinois was founded in 1901).  If you were a young person growing up at that time, the line between a college educated man and one who wasn’t was clear and thick.  If you were “smart enough” and “had means” you applied to college.  Remember that during the early 1900’s it wasn’t even expected that you’d graduate high school, so college was an exceptionally high aspiration for that time in history; college was an enormous privilege.  

In fact, it wasn’t until late 1960’s that we hit a national high school graduation rate of 50%!

Even at the turn of the new millennium, fewer than 25% of adults held a bachelor’s degree…. but, close to 80% held a high school diploma with some amount of college.  Wow! What a huge spike!   Since I’m not an academic researcher, I won’t pretend to know all of the influences that contributed to that spike, however, if you’re near my age, you were raised by baby boomers and undoubtedly heard the same message I did:

“Go to college so you’ll get a good job.”

The message was loud and clear, so much so, that people in my generation headed to college in very large numbers.  If you’re in my generation and didn’t go to college (so you’ll get a good job) you’ve still probably told your own children zillion times that they must go to college (so they’ll get a good job) and it should be pursued at all costs.  It’s deeply ingrained!  But is it still the right advice?


The reason for the quick history lesson is to demonstrate the growth pace of higher education from 1600’s to 1700’s (like a turtle) and then to the 1800’s (same turtle) and then to the 1900’s (same old tired turtle).  From 1900 to 2000 our turtle gets spunky, but from 2000 to 2017?  He’s pretty much got a jet engine strapped to his back.

When old-fashioned correspondence courses were replaced by computer-based distance learning around 2000, everything changed.   Within only 5 years- the industry computermanaged to get a handle on delivering legitimate and accredited courses through roughly 98% of all public colleges and universities, and by the end of the first decade, you could even attend public K-12 online.   For our children, the “go to college” message is very strong, but our children are more resourceful and capable of attaining an education than we could have ever imagined.  With access to information only a click away, our teens expect education to be free, streaming, and shareable.  They expect technologically capabilities that remove inefficiencies – and there are more than a few inefficiencies in the “traditional” college experience.

Some estimate that just under half of all college students will take at least one online course during the completion of their degree, but millions will take courses that are both free and do not offer college credit.  MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses) have tapped into the deep desire for education without the inefficiencies of going to a building somewhere to learn.  Coursera, a large provider of MOOCs, had educated over 5 million students by 2013.  Wrapped into the MOOCs providers are all of the “brand name” university partners you could ever dream of:  Stanford, MIT, Harvard, etc.  Students have access, the courses are free, the courses are streamable, and the courses are shareable.  If the course is poor, the student simply drops and chooses something else.  If the course fills a need for the student, they can dive in and “binge-watch” an entire semester in a weekend!

Students who’ve grown up in the world of non-traditional education (homeschool), with instant access to free content, and a solid awareness of how to access ANYTHING they want to learn, technology is part of their world in a way that hadn’t existed before Placeholder Imagethis millennium.  Is it so impossible to accept that this generation of teens has a different understanding of what education means?  When my children & teens want to know something, they usually Google it.  (YES!  I still taught them how to use an encyclopedia.)  When they’re stuck on an algebra problem, it’s Khan Academy that patiently explains and demonstrates with perfect clarity who to solve the equation.  It’s Professor Martyn Poliakoff at The University of Nottingham who taught my teens about elements of the Periodic Table.  Frankly, our students can access experts in every field through their computer, something unimaginable even 20 years ago.

It’s no surprise that non-college-based learning has developed at an astounding rate.  It’s also no surprise, that there are wrinkles in the cloth.  While a few bad apples spoil the bunch, a uniquely new trend is the “coding boot camp.”  These programs are not affiliated with colleges, eliminate liberal arts and other “college” courses, and get right to the training.  In short, it’s a fast program meant to train coders and get them working asap.  Coding boot camps are almost never longer than 6 months, and graduates of good programs find (high paying) jobs quickly.  It’s hard to argue “go to college, get a good job” confused.jpgwhen colleges graduates are leaving college after 4-6 years with $35,000-$200,000 in student loans and a staggering unemployment rate.  Less than 20% will graduate in 4 years, and about 50% will leave with the debt but not a degree.  The average cost of a coding boot camp lasts about 4 months, costs about $15,000 and graduates can expect to walk into jobs paying around $80,000.  To recap, by the time my high school senior leaves for college in the fall, his classmate may have already finished boot camp and moved to Silicon Valley.

“Go to college so you’ll get a good job.”

Did I mention things are changing at lightning speed?  In an article by CNN Money earlier this week, a new “university” that isn’t really a university at all, just entered the playing field and may be a game-changer.  MissionU has merged the concept of coding boot camp (fast-relevant teaching) with significant industry input  (Spotify, Uber, Caper, Lyft, Facebook, Chegg founders built the curriculum) and the debt-free mentality into a new program that launches later this year.  MissionU is a “learn now, pay later” concept that takes a percentage of your salary once you graduate, but only if you earn more than $50,000 per year.  Students who graduate but do not meet that threshold will never have to pay anything.  The concept, in my humble opinion, is brilliant, because it forces educators to put their money where their mouth is.  This is a significant shift towards a model of shared responsibility.  The school is sharing the responsibility of the student, in essence, they promise to deliver a product “or your money back.”

The traditional college experience is filled with snake pits and makes little to no effort to help students and parents navigate the system.  In fact, colleges offer dozens of majors that lead to high debt and unemployment- it’s on you not to choose one.   I’ll stop short of speaking too harshly because students and parents should take more responsibility before dropping a quarter of a million dollars on their education, but I’ll just finish by saying that colleges are not financially motivated to help your student avoid those mistakes, and it is very hard to get good advice that holds your teen’s best interests at heart.

In closing, the purpose of today’s post is to warn parents in my generation, that what we “know” and “trust” to be true about the “best” and “most direct” path to a rewarding career looks different than when we were pondering our own path.  Our trust and confidence are based on a foundation that is shaky and being redesigned before our eyes.  To say that the education industry has been disrupted is an understatement- it’s completely being revolutionized.  In fact, I can’t even begin to imagine where we’ll be in 6 years when my youngest sets out on this journey for himself.  I’d like to leave you with 3 tips to help you navigate this process:

  1. Work backward.  Start with a target career, and then build a plan to achieve the skills and credentials to practice that career.  The most common mistake is choosing a college before a career plan is devised.  Until you know the exact pathway required (including licenses, certifications, degrees, etc.) to practice the career, you may be wasting valuable time and money.
  2. Constant retraining is expected.  Years ago, one trained for a career and their value as an employee came from their years of experience.  In today’s market, constant retraining is expected.  As such, it doesn’t make sense to invest “everything” in an undergraduate degree that serves to “check the box” while more education, certifications, and credentials will all be expected to remain current and competitive.
  3. Be open minded.  As we’ve seen in the past 17 years, the educational landscape has changed significantly, and the only thing we can be sure of is that more change is coming!

students

Posted in College Admission, Dual Enrollment, High School

Predicting Credit Placement

College subjects are not treated equally. In this post, we’ll predict where your teen’s English 101 or Management CLEP should fall once they go to college.  This is important because choosing college courses for your teen to take while in high school can be a little overwhelming, and this piece of the puzzle will help you tremendously.

This list is a general guide to help you understand where your teen’s college credit accumulated in high school might fall once they go to college.  Note:  if your teen is already enrolled in college or is certain of the college they’ll attend, disregard this list and ask the college directly.  This is a guide for those 1 or more years away from enrollment.

If you want to read a one of my earlier posts  about how courses become accepted for credit,  see my post on Linked in called “Will it Transfer?” Jennifer on LinkedIn

Lets proceed as if the credit has been accepted into the college.  A typical FILTER process  looks something like this:

  1. Accepted Credit

    • All credit that has been accepted starts here.  This may include CLEP, AP, dual enrollment, or transfer credit.  Courses must be 100 level or equalivent.
  2. Degree Distribution Directive

    • In every degree, there are some directives that are vague- it may ask for “6 credits in social science” or it may be specific “3 credits Psychology and 3 credits US History.”  In every case, credit is first evaluated to see if it meets one of the directives for the degree.  Once a slot is full, credit overflows to the next filter below.
  3. General Education Elective

    • The number of general education electives vary by college, but can be as many as 30 or more.  General Education Electives are made up of courses also known as LIBERAL ARTS.  It is unusual for a non-liberal arts course to count as a General Education Elective, but this can vary by school.  Once GE Electives are full, credit overflows to the next filter below.
  4. Free / Open Electives

    • Not all colleges or degrees have openings called Free or Open Electives.  If yours does, this is a “catch all” category that includes all overflowed credit as well as credit that was accepted by the college, but but didn’t fill any of the requirements of the degree.  Non-liberal arts courses that don’t meet the earlier filters all overflow here.  Some degrees deliberately allow for a lot of free electives to encourage adult students to return to college.

TIPS for 4-YEAR BACHELOR OF ARTS/ SCIENCE degree seekers:  As you see in the filter process, accumulating a lot of non-liberal arts credit before you’ve selected a school or degree can be risky later – as a rule of thumb for high school students who plan to earn a 4 year degree, take no more than 1 non-liberal arts course for every 2 liberal arts courses.  This ratio will make for optimum transfer.

Tips for ASSOCIATE OF APPLIED SCIENCE degree seekers:  It’s likely that your degree will require no more than 15 general education courses.  If possible, your best bet is to no accumulate more than 6 credits in any one liberal arts category.  For instance, no more than 6 credits of history.  The majority of your degree will consist of degree-specific courses, so you don’t need a lot of liberal arts/gen eds.

Tips for ASSOCIATE OF ARTS  seekers:  Most of the AA degrees consist entirely of liberal arts courses.  As such, choose only courses from the liberal arts list.


The following subjects are usually classified as LIBERAL ARTS

Social Science
Art / Fine Art
Advanced Writing
Communication
Dance
Film
Foreign Languages
Journalism
Literature
Music
Philosophy
Photography
Religion
Speech
Theater
Astronomy
Biology
Chemistry
Environmental Sciences
Geology
Mathematics / Statistics
Meteorology
Physics
Anthropology
Archaeology
Economics
Geography
History
Political Science
Psychology
Sociology

The following subjects are usually NOT classified as LIBERAL ARTS

Automotive / Engine / Body / Machine
Allied Health / Dental
Aviation
Business / Accounting
Computer Technology
Data Processing
Education
Electronics
Engineering/Engineering Technology
Finance
Fire Science
Health Education / PE / Fitness
Health Services /  Medical Assistant
Home Economics / Culinary Arts
Insurance
Library Science
Management / Business /Human Resources
Marketing / Sales / Advertising / Graphic Design
Nursing / Nursing Assistant
Operations Management
Radiologic Technology
Radio-Television
Real Estate
Recreation / Coaching / Sport / Leisure
Rehabilitation Services / Counseling
Secretarial Science / Administrative Assistant
Social Work / Counseling
Technical Services / Repair

Student Success / Study Skills / Intro to College / Orientation

Posted in College Admission, Credit by Exam

2017 Survey of College Admin

Sometime I like to share articles that help you see inside the big picture of higher education – how it works and what they think. I just read the report from Insider Higher Education this morning (link follows)- they looked at the 2017 survey that asks college leaders (Chief Academic Officers/Provosts- the big bosses) about the state of higher education on their campus today.   I realize you may not be interested in reading the entire thing, but there are 4 quotes I wanted to pull from the summary. If you only have 2 minutes, skip straight to number 4.
1.  “Seventy-three percent also say that their institution relies ‘significantly’ on non-tenure-track professors…35% expect more reliance on adjunct faculty.”
WOW! Ok folks, this is huge. Let me break this down for you.  Tenure (not without problems) really means having a teaching position for life.  Coming from a community college where there are almost zero tenure faculty, even I was shocked by this number. Colleges and universities that have tenure faculty have typically stood out as being the creme de la creme.  Thnk: flagship universities and Ivy League.  These professors are integral to the college’s “brand” and for some fields, it’s the reason students choose a specific university.    But wait, there’s more….
There are other categories besides tenure and non, so if they rely less on tenure, who is doing the teaching?  Certainly they mean just regular -full time faculty?  Uh, nope.  Over 1/3 of them are going to use more adjunct faculty.
What is adjunct?  That’s the academic term that means “temp hire.”  Adjunct work 1 semester at a time, teaching classes the full timers can’t or don’t want to teach.  As it stands, community colleges already have the highest number of adjunct faculty.  I’m not going to slam adjunct work – I did it for 14 years in the community college system, but if you’re paying a premium dollar for tuition, you may be getting the same teacher who is also teaching 6 other sections at 3 other colleges in your town.  (Adjunct earn on average only $1500 per semester per course taught).   As a temp, there are extreme limitations to that teacher’s commitment to the student (that they will never see again) their ability to interject quality into the curriculum (they have no power) and their desperation to be hired back next term (be extra nice to the students – students like A’s).
2.  “45 percent of provosts believe that liberal arts education (across institutional types) is in decline.”
I suspect that’s because students with a strictly liberal arts preparation are having a hard time repaying their enormous student loans while earning low paying jobs. There is a push (rightfully) that college graduates should be employable upon graduation.
My first degree (Associate of Occupational Studies) was to get a job – plain and simple.  I went to culinary school to learn culinary arts so I could become a chef.  Simple.  Everything else is not so simple.  Later, when I earned an AA in general studies and a BA in Social Science (liberal arts), I realized how starkly different a liberal arts education and vocational education were.  My BA didn’t give me “work place skills” I studied social psychology, anthropology, history, and other social sciences.  Interesting, but not job skills.  If I wanted a job in social science, I’d have to earn a PhD so I be hired by a university that would then pay me to teach students studying social science who would then have the option of earning a PhD so they could teach social science to students….  [I’ll give you a minute to let that soak in….]
So, if a vocational education is job training, why do people earn BA degrees in liberal arts? Well to be “educated” of course.  Everyone knows vocational education isn’t real college (heavy sarcasm).  BUT, here’s the rub.  The highly educated but underemployed segment is growing at a HUGE rate.  This is the group that can’t repay their student loans, and the group that is getting expensive colleges in major hot water.  (To be fair, vocational colleges whose students can’t get jobs are also in hot water).
3.  “Eighty-five percent of provosts report that their institutions use student evaluations when judging faculty members for tenure, promotion or raises.”
Do students know that they hold this kind of power?  Bad reviews on Rate My Professor can make or break a career.  I remember in 1997, our college adopted a new philosophy called “Continued Quality Improvement” or CQI.  In short, we could no longer call students students, we were now to think of them as a “customer” and our focus was to shift toward customer service.  Having been a college student as a teen and as an adult, I can tell you there is a stark contrast between my experience as a youth and that of an adult.  While I liked having more power (don’t laugh), we also know what student-driven success looks like.  It looks like an “A” or else.
4.  “This year, 91 percent of provosts at public colleges and universities said they favored awarded credit through CBE”
THIS!  CBE is “competency based education” which is to say a college awards credit for competency rather than time spent in a classroom.  This looks like CLEP, AP, DSST, prior learning assessments, and others.  If you read nothing else in the article, pan down and read the section titled Competency Based Education.  Frequently, at least a few times per month, someone asks me what I think of fewer colleges accepting CLEP or awarding credit for AP.  Huh?  Those number have soared over the past decade (I keep records of such things).    As you read the article, you’ll see 2/3 of all public colleges report awarding credit for some type of CBE, while only around 1/3 for private.  I think that’s reasonable.   Private colleges have a brand development dilemma that gets in the way – but that’s not because of CLEP, those same private colleges also don’t accept much transfer credit either.  It’s just the nature of their business model.
So, one more bit of good news, even with 2/3 currently participating in CBE, those that don’t were asked if they were exploring the idea.  49% said yes.
Posted in Breaking News, College Admission

Heightened Cash Monitoring

Many of you have high school seniors – one more important consideration before narrowing down their target list is to be sure their financial aid status is in good standing.

The following is the most current (December 2016)  list of 540 colleges that were placed under “heightened monitoring” from the Federal Financial Aid/Dept of Education.  You’ll want  to confirm your teen’s target colleges are NOT on this list.

In my city (Charlotte, NC) the local law school just had it’s financial aid participation revoked- completely pulled.  That left a lot of students in a really bad situation because they were/are no longer allowed to borrow using the student loan program – even if they are just a year from graduation. Many students believe they’ll have to transfer and potentially start over.  Keep in  mind, the college is still open, but they can no longer participate in the Federal Financial Aid program.

If a school is on this list, proceed with extreme caution.

What is Heightened Cash Monitoring?  From the Dept of Education:

There are two levels of Heightened Cash Monitoring:

  • Heightened Cash Monitoring 1 (HCM1): After a school makes disbursements to eligible students from institutional funds and submits disbursement records to the Common Origination and Disbursement (COD) System, it draws down FSA funds to cover those disbursements in the same way as a school on the Advance Payment Method.
  • Heightened Cash Monitoring 2 (HCM2): A school placed on HCM2 no longer receives funds under the Advance Payment Method. After a school on HCM2 makes disbursements to students from its own institutional funds, a Reimbursement Payment Request must be submitted for those funds to the Department.

Schools may be placed on HCM1 or HCM2 as a result of compliance issues including but not limited to accreditation issues, late or missing annual financial statements and/or audits, outstanding liabilities, denial of re-certifications, concern around the school’s administrative capabilities, concern around a schools’ financial responsibility, and possibly severe findings uncovered during a program review. Some schools are on this list due to preliminary findings made during a program review that is still open. Those findings could change when the program review is completed.

Below, I’ve copied/pasted the names of schools from the table, but you can get the full Excel spreadsheet (includes address, etc.) at the link below.  Select the most current spreadsheet (December 2015).

https://studentaid.ed.gov/sa/about/data-center/school/hcm

Institution Name

Aaron’s Academy of Beauty
Academy for Careers and Technology
Academy of Cosmetology
Academy of Hair Technology
Academy of Natural Therapy
Academy of Radio & TV Broadcasting
Acupuncture and Massage College
Adrian College
Advance Beauty Techs Academy
Aerosim Flight Academy
Alabama State University
Alderson Broaddus University
Alexandria School of Scientific Therapeutics
Alexandria Technical and Community College
Allen University
All-State Career
All-State Career School
American Academy McAllister Institute
American College of Hairstyling-Des Moines
American College, Dublin Limited (The)
American Institute of Medical Technology
American InterContinental University
American Musical & Dramatic Academy
American National University
American Technical Institute
American University of Paris
AmeriTech College
Anoka Technical College
Anoka-Ramsey Community College
Apollo Career Center
Argosy University
Arkansas Baptist College
Art Institute of Atlanta (The)
Art Institute of Colorado (The)
Art Institute of Fort Lauderdale (The)
Art Institute of Houston (The)
Art Institute of New York City (The)
Art Institute of Philadelphia (The)
Art Institute of Phoenix (The)
Art Institute of Pittsburgh (The)
Art Institute of Portland (The)
Art Institute of Seattle (The)
Art Institute of York (The) – Pennsylvania
Art Institutes International Minnesota (The)
ATA College
Atlanta Institute of Music and Media
Bacone College
Baldwin Beauty Schools
Bay State School of Technology
Beacon College
Beauty Academy
Beauty and Health Institute
Beauty Institute Schwarzkopf Professional (The)
Bellefonte Academy of Beauty
Bemidji State University
Benedict College
Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
Bennett Career Institute
Berks Technical Institute
Bethany College
Bethel College
Bethel College
Bethel University
Birmingham City University
Blue Cliff College
Boise Bible College
Boston Baptist College
Bramson ORT College
Briarcliffe College
Brown College of Court Reporting
Brown Mackie College (The)
Buchanan Beauty College
Burnett International College
Calhoun Community College
California College San Diego
Capri Oak Forest Beauty College
Career Care Institute
Caribbean University
Carnegie Institute
Carolina Christian College
Carsten Institute of Cosmetology
Carver Bible College
Catherine Hinds Institute of Esthetics
CDE Career Institute
Center for Employment Training
Central Alabama Community College
Central Baptist Theological Seminary
Central Christian College of Kansas
Central Christian College of The Bible
Central Lakes College
Central School of Practical Nursing
Century College
Champ’s Barber School
Charleston School of Law
Charlotte Christian College and Theological Seminary
Charter College
Chattanooga College – Medical, Dental and Technical Careers
Cheyney University of Pennsylvania
Choffin Career & Technical Center
Cincinnati College of Mortuary Science
Citizens School of Nursing
Clarks Summit University
Cole Holland College
College of Menominee Nation
CollegeAmerica – Flagstaff
CollegeAmerica Denver
Collins Career Technical Center
Colorado Technical University
Columbia College
Commonwealth of Puerto Rico Department of Education
Community Christian College
Concorde Career College
Concorde Career College
Concorde Career College
Concorde Career College
Concorde Career College
Concorde Career College
Concorde Career College
Concorde Career College
Concorde Career College
Concorde Career Institute
Concorde Career Institute
Concorde Career Institute
Conlee’s College of Cosmetology
Copiah-Lincoln Community College
Cosmetology College of Franklin County
Cosmetology Training Center
Cosmotech School of Cosmetology
Court Reporting Institute of St Louis
Coyne College
Cozmo The School
Crave Beauty Academy
Creative Circus (The)
Creative Hair School of Cosmetology
Dakota County Technical College
David’s Academy of Beauty
Dawson Community College
Delaware Learning Institute of Cosmetology
DeVry University
DiGrigoli School of Cosmetology
D’Jay’s Institute of Cosmetology and Esthiology
Dominican College of Blauvelt
Dominion School of Hair Design
Eastern Nazarene College
Eastern Oklahoma State College
East-West Healing Arts Institute
Ecclesia College
eClips School of Cosmetology and Barbering
Ecumenical Theological Seminary
EDHEC Business School
EDIC  College
Edinburgh Napier University
Elaine Sterling Institute(The)
Emmanuel Bible College
Emmanuel College
Empire College
English Center (The)
Entourage Institute of Beauty and Esthetics
Eureka Institute of Health and Beauty
Evangel University
Everglades University
Ex’pression College
Faith Evangelical College & Seminary
Faith Theological Seminary
Fayette Beauty Academy
Fayette Institute of Technology
FINE Mortuary College
Finger Lakes School of Massage (The)
Finlandia University
Florida Institute of Ultrasound
Florida School of Traditional Midwifery
Fond du Lac Tribal & Community College
Fort Berthold Community College
Fort Worth Beauty School
Fortis College
Fortis College
Fortis College
Fortis College
Fortis College
Fortis College
Fortis College
Fortis College
Fortis Institute
Fortis Institute
Fortis Institute
Fortis Institute
Fortis Institute
Fortis Institute
Fountainhead College of Technology
Francois D. College of Hair Skin & Nails
Frederick School of Cosmetology
Gene Juarez Beauty Schools
George Corley Wallace State Community College – Selma
Gill-Tech Academy of Hair Design
Glenwood Beauty Academy
Global Health College
Globe University
Grace College of Barbering
Grace University
Gratz College
Green Mountain College
Griffith University
Hair Academy (The)
Hair California Beauty Academy
Hairmasters Institute of Cosmetology
Hallmark University
Hamilton Technical College
Hands on Therapy
Hannibal – LaGrange University
Harrington College of Design
Harrisburg University of Science and Technology
Harrison College
Healthcare Preparatory Institute
Hebrew University of Jerusalem (The)
Helms College
Hennepin Technical College
Hibbing Community College
Highland Community College
Hiram College
Hiwassee College
Hobe Sound Bible College
Houston Graduate School of Theology
Houston International College Cardiotech Ultrasound School
Illinois Institute of Art (The)
Image Maker Beauty Institute
Indiana County Technology Center
Infinity Career College
InfoTech Career College
Inner State Beauty School
Institucion Chaviano de Mayaguez
Institute For Therapeutic Massage
Institute of Beauty Careers
Instituto de Banca y Comercio
Instituto Tecnologico de Santo Domingo
Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey
International Barber & Style College
International Culinary Center
International Professional School of Bodywork
International School of Skin and Nailcare
Inver Hills Community College
Iowa Wesleyan College
Itasca Community College
J. F.  Drake State Community and Technical College
James Rumsey Technical Institute
JFK Medical Center Muhlenberg Harold B. and Dorothy A. Snyder Schools
Joffrey Ballet School, American Ballet Center
Johnson C Smith University
Jose Maria Vargas University
JRMC School of Nursing
KD Conservatory College of Film and Dramatic Arts
Keene Beauty Academy
Keiser University
Kendall College
Kentucky Wesleyan College
Keystone College
Kuyper College
L T International Beauty School
Laird Institute of Spa Therapy
Lake Erie College
Lake Superior College
Larry’s Barber College
Lawson State Community College
Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts
Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts
Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts
Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts
Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts
Le Cordon Bleu College of Culinary Arts in Chicago
Leech Lake Tribal College
Lees School of Cosmetology
Little Priest Tribal College
London International Film School
Los Angeles ORT Technical Institute
Lubbock Hair Academy
Lutheran Theological Seminary – Philadelphia
MacMurray College
Maple Springs Baptist Bible College & Seminary
Margaret’s Hair Academy
Marion Military Institute
Maryland University of Integrative Health
McCann School of Business & Technology
MDT College of Health Sciences
Med-Assist School of Hawaii
Medical University of Gdansk
Mesabi Range College
Mesalands Community College
Messenger College
Metro Business College
Metropolitan Learning Institute
Metropolitan State University
Miami International University of Art & Design
Michigan Barber School
Mid City College
MidAmerica Nazarene University
Milan Institute
Milan Institute
Milan Institute
Milan Institute of Cosmetology
Miles Community College
Miller – Motte Technical College
Miller-Motte Technical College
Milwaukee Institute of Art & Design
Mineral County Vocational Technical Center
Minneapolis Community and Technical College
Minnesota School of Business
Minnesota State College-Southeast Technical
Minnesota State Community and Technical College
Minnesota State University Moorhead
Minnesota State University, Mankato
Minnesota West Community and Technical College
Missouri College of Cosmetology North
Missouri School of Barbering & Hairstyling
MKG Beauty & Business
Mount Ida College
Multnomah University
Murdoch University
Nashville Barber and Style Academy
National Beauty College
National Conservatory of Dramatic Arts
National Graduate School of Quality Management (The)
National Institute of Massotherapy –
National Personal Training Institute
National University College
National University of Ireland, Galway
Neosho Beauty College
New England College of Business and Finance
New England Culinary Institute
New England Institute of Art (The)
New Hope Christian College
New Life Business Institute
New York Conservatory For Dramatic Arts (The)
New York Theological Seminary
NewSchool of Architecture and Design
Normandale Community College
North American Baptist Seminary
North Central Opportunities Industrialization Center
North Hennepin Community College
Northcentral University
Northcoast Medical Training Academy
Northern New Mexico College
Northland Community and Technical College
Northwest Career College
Northwest Christian University
Northwest School of Wooden Boat Building
Northwest Technical College – Bemidji
NRI Institute of Health Sciences
Oehrlein School of Cosmetology
Ogle School Hair Skin Nails
Ogle School Hair Skin Nails
Ogle School Hair Skin Nails
Ohio College of Massotherapy
Ohio Valley University
O’More College of Design
Ottawa University
Paine College
Panache Academy of Beauty
Paul Mitchell the School Missouri Columbia
PB Cosmetology Education Centre
Penn Commercial Business/Technical School
Pennco Tech
Pennco Tech
Pennsylvania Institute of Technology
Pentecostal Theological Seminary
Phillips School of Nursing at Mount Sinai Beth Israel
Pike Lincoln Technical Center
Pinchot University
Pine Manor College
Pine Technical and Community College
Pittsburgh Career Institute
Ponca City Beauty College
Ponce Health Sciences University
Ponce Paramedical College (POPAC)
Pontifical Catholic University of Puerto Rico (The)
Porter and Chester Institute
Porter and Chester Institute of Branford
Portland Actors Conservatory
Professional Skills Institute
Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh
Rabbinical College of Long Island
Rainy River Community College
Ralph R Willis Career and Technical Center
Raphael Recanati International School, The Interdisciplinary Center
Redstone College
Remington College
RGV Careers An Institute for Higher Learning
Ridgewater College
River Valley School of Massage
Riverland Community College
Riverside College of Health Careers
Rochester College
Rochester Community and Technical College
Rosedale Technical College
Rosslyn Training Academy of Cosmetology
Roxborough Memorial Hospital
Roxbury Community College
SAE Institute of Technology – Miami
Saint Elizabeth Medical Center
Saint Gregory’s University
Saint Louis Christian College
Saint Mary of the Woods College
Saint Paul College – A Community & Technical College
Salon & Spa Institute
Salon Professional Academy (The)
San Diego Christian College
San Diego Culinary Institute
Sanford-Brown College
Sanford-Brown College
Sanford-Brown College
Sanford-Brown College
Sanford-Brown College
Seminario Evangelico de Puerto Rico
Setting the Standard Barbering and Natural Hair Academy
Sheridan College
Sherrill’s University of Barber & Cosmetology
Shimer College
Shorter University
Sisseton Wahpeton College
SOLEX College
South Central College
South Texas Vocational Technical Institute
South University
Southeast Missouri Hospital College of Nursing and Health Sciences
Southeastern College
Southeastern College
Southeastern Institute
Southeastern Institute
Southeastern Institute
Southern California University SOMA
Southern Illinois University at Carbondale
Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
Southern Technical College
Southern Technical College
Southern Vermont College
Southwest Minnesota State University
Spa Tech Institute
Spanish-American Institute
Spartan College of Aeronautics & Technology
Spartan College of Aeronautics and Technology
Spertus College of Judaica
Spring Hill College
St. Cloud State University
St. Cloud Technical and Community College
St. Luke’s Hospital of Bethlehem, PA
St. Paul’s School of Nursing
St. Paul’s School of Nursing
Stevens Henager College
Studio Art Centers International
Suffolk Beauty Academy
Summit Christian College
Summit College
Swedish Institute
Taylor Andrews Academy Of Hair Design
Taylor Technical Institute
Technical Career Institutes
Texas Beauty College
Thomas Jefferson School of Law
Total Image Beauty Academy
Total Look School of Cosmetology and Massage Therapy
Transformed Barber and Cosmetology Academy
Tribeca Flashpoint College
Trident University International
Trinity Lutheran Seminary
Trinity School of Health and Allied Sciences
Tri-State College of Acupuncture
Tucson College
Tuskegee University
Tyndale University College & Seminary
Ultimate Medical Academy
Unification Theological Seminary
Unilatina International College
United Theological Seminary
Universal Technical Institute
Universal Technical Institute
Universal Technical Institute
Universal Training Institute
Universidad Cat≤lica Nordestana
Universidad Central del Este
Universiteit Utrecht
Universiteit Van Amsterdam
University College Dublin, National University of Ireland, Dublin
University of Antelope Valley
University of Auckland (The)
University of Canterbury
University of Debrecen
University of East London
University of East-West Medicine
University of Geneva
University of Gloucestershire (The)
University of King’s College
University of Melbourne
University of Mobile
University of North Alabama
University of Puerto Rico – Arecibo
University of Puerto Rico – Cayey University College
University of Puerto Rico – Central Administration
University of Puerto Rico – Humacao University College
University of Puerto Rico – Mayaguez
University of Puerto Rico – Medical Science Campus
University of Puerto Rico – Rio Piedras Campus
University of Puerto Rico – Utuado
University of Puerto Rico Bayamon Technical University College
University of Puerto Rico Carolina Regional College
University of Puerto Rico, Aguadilla Regional College
University of Puerto Rico, Ponce
University of Queensland (The)
University of St. Augustine for Health Sciences
University of Sydney
University of the Virgin Islands
University of Toronto
University of Valley Forge
University of Wales – Lampeter
University of West Alabama
University of Westminster
Utica School of Commerce
Vatterott College
Vatterott College
Vatterott College
VEEB Nassau County School of Practical Nursing
Venango County Area Vocational Technical School
Vermilion Community College
Victoria Beauty College
Victoria University of Wellington
Virginia College
Virginia Wesleyan College
Walden University
Walnut Hill College
Webb Institute
Western Pennsylvania Hospital School of Nursing
Westminster College
Wilberforce University
Williamson Christian College
Winona State University
Wood County Technical Center
Xtreme Career Institute
Yechanlaz Instituto Vocacional
Yeshiva Shaarei Torah of Rockland
YTI Career Institute
YTI Career Institute – Altoona