Posted in Community college, Credit by Exam, Distance Learning, Straighterline

BOG AAS Pierpont Community and Technical College

This is the follow-up post you’ve been waiting for!  Last week I told you about the West Virginia Community College System’s little secret:  CHEAP and FAST associate degrees for adults with at least 12 previously earned college credits from a Regionally Accredited college (I mistakenly said 15 in my original post, you only need 12!). The cost?  Nothing….. but wait.  Let’s talk.

First, know that this is a totally legitimate Regionally Accredited Associate’s degree through a community college in West Virginia.  Pierpont Community and Technical College is not the only college in the country that offers a Board of Governor’s Associate of Applied Science degree – many do. In fact, your local community college may.  A Board of Governor’s degree is simply a traditional college’s way of going around a college’s traditional requirements to encourage adult learners to return to school, or to allow those with non-traditional credit to complete a degree.

Since I’m organizing a degree plan through Pierpont for a friend, my research is specific to Pierpont.   We had a lot of interest on the Facebook group about this degree, so I’m thrilled to bring this to you!

I am told that all of the West Virginia Community Colleges offer BOG – AAS degrees, however, not all are as easy to complete as this one, which is why I selected Pierpont.  There are many adults pursuing this specific degree over on InstantCert, so you can also visit that forum and read some first-hand experiences. 


Is Pierpont’s BOG – AAS a good fit for you?

  1. Did you graduate high school /earn a GED at least 2 years ago?
  2. Do you have at least 12 graded college credits earned through a Regionally Accredited college?  They can be online or in-seat, but if you don’t have them, you’ll have to complete them somewhere.  You can do it anywhere or Pierpont.

As you can see, this is a program focused on attracting the adult learner who may have left college or the military and wants to finish their degree.  So, what’s the catch?

Not a “catch” but a limitation.  This is an Associate’s of Applied Science degree- which means it’s not meant to transfer perfectly into a 4-year program, however, if you attend a West Virginia-based public 4-year college or university, they have an articulation agreement that allows a perfect block transfer.  In other words, if your goal is to earn a 4-year degree, you’re going to want to look at West Virginia public colleges.  If you intend on attending in a different state or a private college, a transfer may be limited or significantly restricted and not result in a 60 credit transfer.   This degree is best suited to someone who is satisfied with only an Associate’s degree, or who wouldn’t object to attending a WV public university.  (Yes, online is an option too).


Cost

The cost to complete this degree through Pierpont is $0.  Meaning, they don’t charge you anything to apply, anything to transfer, or anything to graduate.  You can literally transfer in 100% of your credits and be awarded a degree.

If you don’t have all of the credits you need, you’ll have to pay for them yourself, but the good news is that you can control those costs and cash flow the whole thing for very little out of pocket cost.  Since they accept all military, CLEP, DSST, AP, and ACE credit, you can choose the way you earn those credits.  As an example, you can use Straighterline (a program my 10th grader used last school year to earn 39 credits for $1200)  For someone that only needs 3 or 4 courses, you could simply take CLEP exams ($100 each).

Since there is no way for me to know what credit you already have or where they will fall on the degree template, it’s hard to estimate costs that apply to all of you, but, you can use this generic tool to help give you an idea.  (YOUR COSTS may differ)

60 credits REQUIRED for this degree

Subtract the number of credits you already have from all sources including CLEP, ACE, etc.  Be sure you already have at least 12 college credits from a Regionally Accredited college!

Subtract 11 10 (the number of free credits you’ll earn from the options below)

= the number of credits to pay for.  

If you use the resources in this post, you can earn the rest of your college credits for about $33 per credit, so multiply the number left to earn x $33 to get a rough idea.

If you have 12 left to earn = $396

If you have 24 left to earn = $792

If you have 36 left to earn = $1188

The cost examples you see are the “all in” costs from application to graduation.  You can see why this is so exciting!!  The average Associate’s Degree in the United States can cost between $10,000 and $30,000.

If you do not already have 12 college credits from a Regionally Accredited College, your costs will be more.  If you live outside of West Virginia and want to take classes at Pierpont, their tuition is $432 per credit, which is the LEAST cost effective way to complete this degree.  Look at your local community college first, where you may be able to complete your courses for closer to $100 per credit.


Program Information Page Pierpont Board of Governors AAS Degree


Credit Distribution

A credit distribution explains where your credits have to fall in order to meet a degree’s requirements.  In other words, the degree requires 60 credits, but you don’t meet that requirement by simply having 60 credits.  You have to distribute credit into the right slots.  it doesn’t matter where your existing 12 credits fit into this distribution, only that you have them in there somewhere.   NOTE: You have to have English 101 credit, either by course or exam.  Everything else is undesignated.  In other words, you can choose ANY course from a category.

NOTE 1: It doesn’t matter where your pre-existing 12+ credits fit into this distribution, only that you have them in there somewhere.

NOTE 2: You have to have English 101 credit, either by course or exam.  Everything else is undesignated.  In other words, you can choose ANY course from a category.

6 Credits Communication English 101 (or similar)

AND

Any 3 cr. English or Communication

6 Credits Math or Science Any 3 cr. Math or Science

AND

Any 3 cr. Math or Science

6 Credits Social Sciences Any 3 cr. Social Science

AND

Any 3 cr. Social Science

3 Credits Computer Literacy Any 3 cr. Computer Literacy
39 College Credits Any subject*

COOL THING TO NOTE:  If you have 15 or more credits in one subject, you’ll be awarded an Area of Study on your transcript.  


WARNING:  I need to emphasize that the courses below meet all of the specified requirements set by the college and should transfer seamlessly.

Still, it is a wise investment of your time to reach out to the program advisor and discuss your degree plan in advance of earning tons of credit independently.

Parks, Nancy W.

Director of Assessment, Advising & Testing
Associate Professor of Academic Studies
304-367-4990

Ways to Earn Free ACE Credit

If you have enough space in the “39 credit” category, you can pick up 11 10 college credits totally free through the following ACE sources open to anyone!

This list was generously assembled by the members of InstantCert.    Members there have successfully applied these 11 10 credits to this degree.  NOTE:  You will have to open an ACE account to collect and hold your ACE credit.  ACE is a third party credit evaluator, it’s necessary in order to turn your work into actual college credit.

Don’t be intimidated by this step –  I made a video to walk you through the process.

(2 Credits) The Institutes

The American Institute For Chartered Property Casualty Underwriters (commonly referred to as “The Institutes”) offer a free ethics course that is ACE recommended for 2 credits.

  • 312N-H Ethics and the CPCU Code of Professional Conduct (2 credits) – an upper level ethics/philosophy course that meet’s TESU‘s General Education “ethics” requirement (you might have to ask for an exception to be made for the last credit, but typically this is automatically granted. The 3rd credit is to be made up as a general ed elective).

To signup, use the following link: http://www.theinstitutes.org/comet/learning_modules/cpcu_ethics.htm

Select the FREE option. You should not do the $5 option. The paid option is for “Continuing Education credit,” which is different than college credit. The free version is ACE approved for college credit.

(2 Credits 1 Credit) National Fire Academy

The National Emergency Training Center/National Fire Academy (NFA) offers two free courses that are ACE-recommended for 1 credit each.

  • Q0118 Self-Study Course for Community Safety Educators  (1 credit) currently not available for college credit, but if it is renewed, I’ll add it back in.
  • Q0318 Fire Service Supervision: Self Study (1 credit)

To signup, use the following link and find the course code in the list, Q0318: http://apps.usfa.fema.gov/nfacourses/catalog/search?&&forget=true&courseCode=Q

After you are enrolled, use this login URL to take the classes: https://nfa.plateau.com/learning/user/login.jsp

(1 Credit) Sophia – Developing Effective Teams

Sophia offers a number of paid ACE-approved courses that are fairly expensive. However, they do offer a free 1 credit course:

  • SOPH-0021 – Developing Effective Teams (1 credit)

You can sign up for the course at https://www.sophia.org/online-courses/developing-effective-teams

(6 Credits) TEEX Cybersecurity

Texas A&M Engineering Extension Service (TEEX) offers three ACE-approved courses recommended for 2 credits each. These are DHS/FEMA funded and therefore free for the general public to take.

  • Cyber 101 – Cybersecurity for Everyone (2 credits)
  • Cyber 201 – Cybersecurity for IT Professionals (2 credits)
  • Cyber 301 – Cybersecurity for Business Professionals (2 credits)

To signup, use the following link and make sure you sign up for all classes under these three headings, there are multiple courses per heading: Cyber 101, 201, 301: https://teex.org/Pages/Program.aspx?catID=607

After you are enrolled, use this login URL to take the classes: https://my.teex.org


Ways to Earn Low-Cost ACE Credit

There are a handful of popular ACE credit sources. You may have already heard of a few of them:  Saylor Academy, Study.com, Straighterline, Sophia, Shmoop, Davar/Tor, ed4Credit, EdX, and Pearson.   Honestly, it’s impossible for me to go through each of these and provide a full list of options, but know that there are MANY and if the course is ACE evaluated, it’s accepted.  For the sake of keeping this post concise, I want to emphasize 2 providers:  Saylor Academy and Straighterline.

 Saylor Academy

If you can pass a really tough exam, Saylor Academy is THE cheapest option for Communications, Math, Science, Social Science, and Other.   I don’t know the exact pass rate for each, but I know a lot of good testers who couldn’t pass these exams or barely passed- still, I want to tell you about them because they only cost $25 each (proctored at home via webcam) and for $25, that’s only $8.33 per credit – without leaving your house! So, if your budget is tighter than tight if you’re a good test taker, and you’re up for a challenge, I think you should give one a try.    You can choose courses from this list that have an ACE# next to them.  Note, I don’t suggest their Sociology or Psychology since they are not a full 3 credits each.  But, you can still use them, but you’ll need to make up the difference with another course.

Saylor Coures Matched to the Credit Distribution

COMMUNICATION:

  • COMM001: Principles Of Human Communication

MATH or SCIENCE:  

  • BIO101: Introduction to Molecular and Cellular Biology
  • CHEM101: General Chemistry I
  • MA001: College Algebra
  • MA005: Calculus I
  • MA121: Introduction to Statistics
  • PHYS101: Introduction to Mechanics
  • PHYS102: Introduction to Electromagnetism

SOCIAL SCIENCE:

  • ECON101: Principles of Microeconomics
  • ECON102: Principles of Macroeconomics
  • POLSC101: Introduction to Political Science
  • POLSC221: Introduction to Comparative Politics

OTHER:

  • ENVS203: Environmental Ethics, Justice & World Views (while this does have a science prefix, it has been ACE evaluated a philosophy course – not science)
  • BUS101: Introduction to Business
  • BUS103: Introduction to Financial Accounting
  • BUS105: Managerial Accounting
  • BUS203: Principles of Marketing
  • BUS206: Management Information Systems
  • BUS205: Business Law and Ethics
  • BUS208: Principles of Management
  • BUS210: Corporate Communication
  • BUS303: Strategic Information Technology
  • CS102: Introduction to Computer Science II
  • CS302: Software Engineering
  • CS402: Computer Communications and Networks
  • PHIL103: Moral and Political Philosophy

 

Straighterline

Straighterline is cost-effective when you work quickly, and the way to work quickly is to skip the lessons.  I would never suggest that to my teens (I make them do every lesson!) but the tests and quizzes are what make up your grades, and all of the test content comes from the free ebook – not the lesson.  Really, it’s your decision.

I wrote a really long post on how to select Straighterline courses.  The strategy I use is a good one, and I highly suggest you read it before signing up.   Also, Straighterline ALWAYS has coupon codes running.  You can find my coupon list here.

To keep things simple, any Straighterline course can be used.  Most of the courses cost $59 before coupon and require a $99/month membership fee.  An adult focused on the tests (skipping the lessons) can complete 1 course per week comfortably.  If you really grind, you can complete 2 per week, but you won’t have a social life.   Since you’re paying a monthly fee, you want to try and complete ALL your Straighterline courses in 1 month (or 2 at the most).

TIP:  when using coupons at Straighterline, purchase your courses in individual transactions.  This allows the “1 coupon per transaction” to reset with each purchase. 

Cost for Straighterline:  $99 (1-month membership) plus course ($59 average with a $50 off coupon = $9 per course)  The minimum cost for 1 course will be $108, but every course AFTER that initial membership fee is whatever you pay for the class! So, if you can use 3 more coupon codes, you can get 3 more courses for $9 each = $27!

TIP:  You can start and stop your Straighterline membership without losing your place in your courses.  My oldest son took a 2-year hiatus and picked up where he left off! 


 

Credit by Exam

Credit by exam allows you to study for a subject on your own using whatever resources you can pull together, and then take a multiple choice exam on the subject.  If you pass, you earn college credit in the subject.  The two big exam brands you’ll want to look at are CLEP and DSST.  If you follow Homeschooling for College Credit on Facebook or this blog, you’ve probably seen my What is CLEP?  video and my suggested study resources.  If not, it’s worth looking at, because it will open an entire world of credit earning options to you!  In short, I want to help you assign CLEP and DSST exams to their proper category.  See the table below:

CLEP DSST
Other Financial Accounting

Introductory Business Law

Principles of Management

Principles of Marketing

American Literature

Analyzing and Interpreting Lit.

English Literature

Humanities

French

Spanish

German

Business Ethics and Society

Introduction to Business

Money and Banking

Organizational Behavior

Personal Finance

Principles of Finance

Principles of Supervision

Ethics in America

Introduction to World Religions

Communications College Composition Advanced English Composition

Technical Writing

Social Sciences American Government

History of the United States I

History of the United States II

Human Growth and Development*

Introduction to Educational Psychology

Introductory Psychology

Introductory Sociology

Principles of Macroeconomics

Principles of Microeconomics

Social Sciences and History

Western Civilization I

Western Civilization II

A History of the Vietnam War

Art of the Western World

The Civil War and Reconstruction

Criminal Justice

Foundations of Education

Fundamentals of Counseling

General Anthropology

Human/Cultural Geography

Lifespan Developmental Psychology*

History of the Soviet Union

Substance Abuse

Math & Science Biology

Calculus

Chemistry

College Algebra

College Mathematics

Natural Sciences

Precalculus

Fundamentals of College Algebra

Math for Liberal Arts

Principles of Statistics

Astronomy

Environmental Science

Principles of Physical Science I

Computer Literacy Information Systems

 

Computing and Information Technology

Management Information Systems

Cybersecurity

*choose one but not both


How Do I Begin?

You can contact Pierpont directly to begin the process.  Since I know many of you have questions about your credit and will want to connect with others working this plan, I have created a Facebook group for this specific purpose.

Pierpont BOGgers will be a special group specifically for Homeschooling for College Credit members who are working on the Pierpont BOG Associate degree.  In the group, you’ll be able to ask questions of others and contribute to the working body of knowledge that is shared here and passed out to the other members who would like to complete this degree.  The group will “open” for membership on 9/10/2017 and will remain active as long as we have an interest.

 

Posted in College Majors, Community college

Reader Question: Is there a low-cost way to do medical school?

Q:  Is there a low-cost way to do med school? 

A:  Yes and no.  Medical school is expensive, and to get there, you need a bachelor’s degree first!  So, you’re talking about a LOT of education.  My BIGGEST piece of advice is to keep your undergraduate degree as low as humanly possible because you’ll be paying interest on THOSE student loans for a long time if you take any.

UNDERGRADUATE NOTES:  Unless your teen receives a full tuition full room and board scholarship to a private or out of state school, the lowest cost process is as follows:  use CLEP, AP and dual enrollment in high school for everything except for the sciences.  Attend your community college for the first two years (general education) earning EXCEPTIONAL grades (you’ll need all A’s), apply for the Phi Theta Kappa Community College scholarship.  Transfer to an in-state public university and live at home while doing so.  Take 15 credits per semester to graduate in 4 years while using summer to work (for money) and volunteer in a medical capacity (for service hours). 

But, there are some tricks and strategies you can use to bring the cost of Medical School down.  Can you attend for free?  In some cases, yes.  

(1)  The Ph.D. Md route.  Ahh, even MORE education!   If your teen has completed a lot of college credit in high school, they are probably younger than their peers anyway, so what’s another couple years?  Kidding aside, this isn’t an easy route, but you can “add” the research doctorate to your med school process, and usually, they will provide some amount of free tuition and or a stipend for doing so.

(2) National Health Service Corps Scholarship.   This is a 100% tuition scholarship for medical school (also counts for Physician Assistant, Dentistry, Doctor of Nurse Practitioner, or Certified Nurse Midwife) in addition, you get a $1316/month stipend, all fees, books, clinical supplies, uniforms, and educational supplementary fees covered 100%. Some students will also qualify for partial or full undergraduate loan forgiveness.
Recipients of this scholarship will have to repay each year of scholarship with 1 year of service (2-4 years) in a health professional shortage area – in other words, you can’t choose where you work immediately after graduation. You commit to working (full salary) in certain areas where they *really* need doctors, dentists, etc. After those few years of service are fulfilled, you can go on with your practice as you choose. As of 2016, they awarded 330 full awards. What they DON’T disclose is how many applicants try for it. You can assume it is competitive, but in my experience, FEWER THAN YOU THINK will apply. A lot of the time, scholarships are left on the table because people don’t apply.  Application cycles open early Jan/Feb of each year.   http://www.nhsc.hrsa.gov/scholarships

(3)  Attend in-state public.  Apply to ALL of the MD (and DO) programs, of course, but it’s usually cheaper to attend a public university as an in-state student.  Not all states have medical schools, and of those that do, many are private (typically charge the same for instate and out of state) but if you’re in a position to choose, it’s a lot less expensive.  Wikipedia has a nice state-by-state list of all the medical schools.  List of Medical Schools

Example of cost difference at the University of Colorado School of Medicine

in-state 4 years:  ~$146,000

out of state 4 years:  ~$250,000

(4) Health Professions Scholarship (Military).  Army, Navy, and Air Force will all pay 100% of the student’s medical, dental, advanced practice nursing, optometry, pharmacy, veterinary, social worker, or physician assistant tuition.  Candidates must already possess a bachelor’s degree and have an acceptance letter to a med school program before they can enlist.  Incentives vary based on branches of service, but during professional training (med school), the student is placed on inactive reserve.   Upon completion, they begin their service obligation as an officer and will complete anywhere from 4-6 years of service.

Examples of the different branch’s incentives for 2016:

100% tuition, textbooks, lab, and fees

$2,000 per month cash stipend

$20,000 sign on bonus


There are a lot of math/cost questions surrounding the medical school question.  Is it worth it? Most number-crunchers say “no” but they are assuming you’re paying rack rate for tuition. The 1 Million Dollar Mistake …and you’d never let your teen do that, right?

The American Association of Medical Colleges publishes a record of all costs of all medical schools each year.


U.S. NEWS RANKING

Remember to multiply tuition shown x4

Below is a list of the 10 least expensive public medical schools based on tuition and required fees. Unranked schools, which did not meet certain criteria required by U.S. News to be numerically ranked, were not considered for this report. The F. Edward Hebert School of Medicine at Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, a federal service postgraduate academy that waives tuition and fees in return for military service, was excluded from this list.

Medical school (name) (state) In-state tuition & fees (2015-2016) U.S. News research rank U.S. News primary care rank
Texas A&M Health Science Center $16,432 76 (tie) 78 (tie)
University of Texas Health Science Center—San Antonio $17,661 60 (tie) 71 (tie)
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center $17,737 84 (tie) 84 (tie)
University of North Texas Health Science Center $19,022 RNP* 50 (tie)
University of New Mexico $19,233 78 (tie) 45 (tie)
University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center $19,343 25 (tie) 21 (tie)
University of Texas Health Science Center—Houston $20,092 56 (tie) RNP
Marshall University (Edwards) (WV) $20,100 RNP RNP
West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine $21,650 RNP RNP
East Carolina University (Brody) (NC) $22,281 88 (tie) 32 (tie)

 

Below is a list of the 10 ranked private medical schools with the lowest tuition and fees in 2016. Two of these schools offer discounts to in-state residents – the Baylor College of Medicine and the Miller School of Medicine at the University of Miami. The prices given for the schools in this article are the full-freight rates paid by out-of-state students. Unranked schools, which did not meet certain criteria required by U.S. News to be numerically ranked, were not considered for this report.

School (name) (state) Tuition and fees (2016-2017) U.S. News research rank U.S. News primary care rank
Baylor College of Medicine (TX) $32,663 21 8 (tie)
Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine (PA) $33,055 RNP RNP
University of Miami (Miller) (FL) $42,642 48 (tie) 68
University of Pikeville (KY) $42,975 RNP RNP
Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine—Virginia, Carolinas, and Auburn $43,800 RNP RNP
Kansas City University of Medicine and Biosciences (MO) $44,595 RNP RNP
Lincoln Memorial University (DeBusk) (TN) $47,880 RNP RNP
Hofstra University (NY) $49,500 71 (tie) 55 (tie)
Mayo Clinic School of Medicine (MN) $49,900 20 31 (tie)
Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine (NY) $50,270 RNP RNP
Posted in College Admission, Community college, Dual Enrollment, Uncategorized

Community College in the News

NPR Want to Finish College?

Did anyone read The Center for Community College Student Engagement Report 2017? Maybe not, but you may have read about it on NPR’s website this morning.  If you have the time, you can read the quick summary linked above.  I’m going to take a moment and share my thoughts, which I think other Homeschooling for College Credit parents may find useful.

“Center for Community College Student Engagement demonstrates that students who enroll full-time in community colleges fare better than their part-time counterparts…50 percent of always-full-time students earned an associate degree or certificate. In contrast, only 23 percent of always-part-time students complete their degrees.”

The community college was my employer for 18 years.  I worked for the largest district in the state of Iowa, first as a department chair and administrator, and later when I started homeschooling, as a community college teacher.  Some of you may remember reading in Homeschooling for College Credit, that I was confused by the lack of love for the community college system- it serves a lot of people from all walks of life.  In fact, if you’ve followed our Facebook Group, you know that I have a lot of great things to say about the community college as a system.  That being said…..

The community colleges seem a little out of touch lately with their role in the education industry and seem to be having a bit of an identity crisis.

“Probably for over a decade now, there’s been a lot of conversation about getting more students to complete community college,” says Evelyn Waiwaiole, executive director for the Center for Community College Student Engagement at the University of Texas at Austin. “While attending full-time will be unrealistic for every student, we need to think about why always-part-time students are having a qualitatively different experience and push for changes to be made.”

Here’s what she didn’t say- community college completion rates are somewhere around 8-12% depending on what source you reference. These rates make upper administration lose their minds- and I get it, they want to see higher numbers like those of a 4-year college (about 50-65% which is still pretty low), but what if they’re worried about the wrong thing?  Not everyone uses the community college to earn an Associate of Arts degree!

Community colleges serve a purpose.  They are open enrollment, which is to say that no matter your academic ability, they’ll let you sign up to learn something.  Whether you take courses for credit or personal enrichment, you’re allowed to register.  If you don’t have the required credentials or prerequisite test scores to take certain courses, they’ll provide those too.  Community colleges provide an avenue to earn a GED as well as many quick-employment certificates that can lead to immediate job training.  IN ADDITION, they also award Associate degrees.  

degree

It is my opinion that upper administration has lost sight of their role in our community, and has really started to push for all their students to earn an Associate degree.  Yet, an Associate degree doesn’t always transfer to a 4-year college (depends on your state) and an Associate degree isn’t always an efficient route to a career (ex. Real Estate License requires completing a course, not a degree) and an Associate degree is usually full of general education courses- the very courses students complain about.

The report and summary go on to argue that when students attend full time vs part time, that they’re more likely to complete a degree (this shouldn’t shock anyone) so we should encourage all students to attend full time!  This was the best-dressed marketing effort I’ve read this year.  Of course, colleges want your student to attend full time, of course, they do.  You don’t need an economics lesson from me to tell you why community colleges want to increase their enrollment or why 4-year colleges think you should skip community college and head right to their front door.

EVERYONE is fighting for your student and the dollars they bring. EVERYONE wants enrollment.

So, what does this mean for homeschooling families who want to know where the community college fits into their high school?  I want to point out some reasons that I think the community college is worth your consideration.  This isn’t an apologetics piece, but it’s not a criticism either- it’s simply my thoughts and opinion on how to use the community college in high school and after graduation.


 

For homeschooled high school teens:

  1. DUAL ENROLLMENT.  It’s the community college is the most likely college to allow dual enrollment participation for your teen.  While a few private colleges offer this option, but those programs tend to have competitive admissions or restrictive summer programs.  Community college dual enrollment allows full semester enrollment that awards college credit alongside the high school credit awarded by the parent.
  2. VARIETY:  Dual enrollment through the community college is broader than that of a 4-year college, and includes liberal arts as well as career and trade occupational courses- reflective of the kinds of degree programs offered at the college.
  3.  NON-CREDIT:  The community college closest to you offers a nice catalog of non-credit options.  These are perfectly compatible with homeschooling and can be used as a full curriculum.  Best of all, non-credit options do not require the student to “apply” to the college, rather they simply “register” for the course.  Examples you’ll probably find locally include full sequences of foreign languages, computer programs, and even those that lead to licensure or certifications (property management, real estate, nursing assistant, EMT, and others)  The entrance requirement is usually “age 16” however exceptions can sometimes be made.
  4. TUITION BREAKS:  Some states have community college (or public 4-year college) funding that allows high school students to take courses for free or reduced tuition.  Call your local community college to see if your state has this program.
  5. DISTANCE LEARNING:  Community colleges have really embraced distance learning and a number Homeschooling for College Credit families use community colleges from all over the country.  In other words, you can live in any state and take advantage of the super-low tuition offered through New Mexico’s community college system (about $40/credit).
  6. TESTING CENTER:  If you’re looking for a CLEP or DSST testing center, it’s probably at your community college.  Typically, community colleges have lower proctoring fees than the 4-year colleges.
  7. TRANSFER-FRIENDLY:  Universities in your state almost always all dual enrollment and summer credit earned in high school to transfer to their university.  If they don’t, it’s probably because they don’t accept transfer credit as a general policy, not because of the community college.
  8. PRESERVING FRESHMAN SCHOLARSHIPS:  Credit earned while enrolled in high school almost never counts “against” freshman status, leaving your teen eligible for freshman scholarships.  Typically, the credit earned during high school is applied once the student is already enrolled and sometimes after completion of the first semester.  In other words, they enroll as a freshman, and after 1 semester may be bumped to a sophomore or junior.
  9. HIGHER LEVEL COURSES:  If your teen finishes calculus or French 4 by sophomore year in high school, you’re probably going to have a hard time locating a suitable higher level course.  For those students, it makes sense to enroll in the community college and access no only college credit, but classes at a higher level.

For homeschool graduates:

  1. OPEN ENROLLMENT:  The community college will enroll your homeschool graduate.  The entire “college application process” can be removed from your equation, and your teen can simply register for classes.  In the case of not meeting a certain benchmark for a certain class, the community college will provide a pathway to make it happen.  For instance, if your teen never finished Algebra 1, never took the SAT, and struggles through math, they can still enroll.  There are no essays, interviews, SAT scores, letters of reference, etc.  The college welcomes all students and places them in the level they need, even if the level is lower than “college level.”
  2. TRANSCRIPT ACCEPTANCE:  You can be sure that your homeschool transcript will be accepted at your community college.
  3. LAST MINUTE ENROLLMENT:  Applying a year ahead of enrollment is great if you have a target college in mind, but community colleges allow application and enrollment even through the first week of classes- assuming there is space.
  4. ENTRANCE TESTING:  The majority of community colleges offer their own entrance test at no charge.  This test, taken on your own schedule, is to assess writing, reading, and math level.  There is no way to “fail” this test, though doing well is obviously better for your student.  Students who have taken high school tests like ACT or SAT can sometimes use those in place of entrance testing.
  5. CLEP/AP/DSST AWARDS:  The majority of community colleges award college credit by exam for CLEP, AP, and DSST.  While policies vary, it is unusual that they would award little to nothing (if that’s the case, pick a different community college).
  6. ACCREDITATION:  Community colleges are all regionally accredited, that is the gold standard.  Note that not all 2-year colleges are community colleges and not all 4-year colleges are regionally accredited!
  7. ARTICULATION:  About half of the states have articulation agreements in place, which are formal contractual agreements between the community college and the state’s public colleges.  These agreements guarantee transfer of certificates, diplomas, degrees, or courses.  It’s also worth emphasizing that about half of the states don’t have articulation agreements, but if yours does, this is a huge bonus.
  8. GED / HIGH SCHOOL EQUIVALENCY: If your student wants a GED, prep courses and advisement are available (almost always for free) through your community college. Most community colleges offer the exam as well.  In addition, some of the new high school equivalency exams are worth 10 college credits.
  9. CERTIFICATES:  Unlike a 4-year university, community colleges have “bite-sized” programs that issue certificates or certification after as few as 1 class.  These are usually directed toward job training or a specialization (forklift certification, graphic design, etc.)  Sometimes, the classes inside of a certificate will transfer into a larger diploma or degree at the same college.
  10. TERMINAL DEGREES:  The term “terminal degree” means that the degree has an ending point, in other words, there is not education beyond the terminal degree.  Often, you’ll hear a Ph.D. referred to as a “terminal degree” because there is no degree higher, but at a community college, Associate of Applied Science and Associate of Occupational Studies are also terminal degrees.  These degrees are not intended to transfer to a 4-year college, the degree is the highest training in that industry, and at the completion of the degree, the student enters their career. Besides an AA or AS degree, almost every degree at the community college is a terminal degree.
  11. STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES:  Unlike 4-year colleges, a community college sees a huge population that needs special support.  Whether it’s simple tutoring or accommodating a diagnosed disability, the community college is excellent at serving this segment of our population.
  12. AGE LIMITS:  Community colleges serve students from age 10-100 and attending classes on campus will likely expose your teen to people of all ages.  While the 4-year colleges serve the traditionally aged student (17-22), it’s not unusual to see a huge age range in any community college classroom.  We have Homeschooling for College Credit families with very young teens taking classes (as young as 12) and as a teacher, I’ve had retired senior citizens in my classes- they were some of my best students!
  13. COST:  Community college is almost always the lowest cost option for traditional college attendance.  The average cost of tuition at a community college is $100 per credit, so an average course (3 credits) will cost you roughly $300 plus books.  While this is a lot more expensive than some of the methods we talk about here (CLEP, AP, DSST, Straighterline, Saylor, etc.) those cost saving methods are alternatives that aren’t good options for everyone.  On your basic English 101 taken on campus with an instructor, your community college is likely to be your most affordable option.  As such, you should know community colleges WANT you to stay local.  They often hike the prices beyond belief when you are out of the district or out of state.  If you can’t attend your local community college, all cost promises are off the table.
  14. PELL GRANTS = FREE TUITION:  A Pell Grant is a financial need-based grant given to eligible students who have filled out the FAFSA financial aid application.  Grants don’t have to be repaid, so if your student qualifies for a Pell Grant, it will absolutely go the farthest at your community college.  Some quick math- a full Pell Grant award in 2017 is $5,575.00  That means, if your teen qualifies and attends college full time, they should receive $5,575.00  If you divide that by the number of credits you’d complete as a full-time student in 1 year (30), you’ll get $185.83.  That means, that your student’s Pell Grant will pay full tuition if your college’s per credit rate is under $185.83!  (know that the average in-state 4-year university charges about $300 per credit, and the average private 4-year university charges about $1100 per credit!)

Referenced:  Center for Community College Student Engagement 2017 National Report