Posted in ACE, Self-Paced Learning, Shmoop

Shmoop Discount Codes

I emailed Shmoop and asked for discount codes to share with my homeschool community, and they gave me some! I have never used Shmoop, and am unfamiliar with their different plans, so this isn’t a promotion, I just wanted to share.  Shmoop offersACE evaluated college credit courses.

 

Teacher +10 (code: HCCPL10) = 10% discount
Teacher One Year (code: HCCONEYR) = 10% discount
Student One Year (code: HCCSONEYR) = 10% discount
Student College Plus (code: HCCCP) = 10% discount
Student Monthly (code: HCC2OFFSM) $2.00 discount
Teacher Monthly (code: HCC2OFFTM) $2.00 discount

Posted in Uncategorized

DSST World Religions using Harvard edX

If you’re planning the DSST World Religions exam this year, you’ve probably been a bit overwhelmed but the massive amount of content!  If your teen learns well devouring a textbook, you won’t have any trouble – but for those who need more….Imagine how exciting it was to find a full selection of courses that match the content of this exam being offered by Harvard University on the edX platform.

Imagine how exciting it was to find a full selection of courses that match the content of this exam being offered by Harvard University on the edX platform.  EdX courses combine lecture, reading, activities, quizzes, and in some cases human interaction.  Of the many I’ve taken or assigned to my kids, I’ve always been impressed.

EdX is a free platform- it’s like the public library for online education, but there are sometimes opportunities to purchase certificates, credentials, and the like as well.  These courses are all free and do not require purchasing anything.  If you WANT to purchase certificates, that’s completely up to you!

DSST Introduction to World Religion   <– official exam content
This exam was developed to enable schools to award
credit to students for knowledge equivalent to that
learned by students taking the course. The exam
covers topics such as dimensions and approaches to
religion; primal religions; Hinduism; Buddhism;
Confucianism; Taoism; Judaism; Christianity; Islam;
Shintoism; Hellenic and Roman traditions; and  Scientology.

The DSST exam costs $80 and is worth 3 potential college credits.

This list of Harvard courses can be woven together into your own year-long World Religion course.  All are self-paced, but each course will range from 10-20 hours.  Your teen will have no trouble logging 120 hours.

Harvard University edX Religious Literacy

Harvard University edX Religion, Conflict, and Peace Course

Harvard University edX Hinduism Course

Harvard University edX Judaism Course

Harvard University edX Christianity Course

Harvard University edX Early Christianity

Harvard University edX Buddhism

Harvard University edX Islam


OTHER RESOURCES

One of my favorite sites Free CLEP Prep also has a World Religion study guide and practice test.

There are InstantCert Flashcards for those who just want to zero in on the “need to know” facts for this exam.  Use coupon code 100150 for $5 off.


OFFICIALLY SUGGESTED TEXTBOOKS

  • Religions of the World, 12th Edition, 2011, Lewis Hopfe and Mark Woodward
    • Expensive (over $50) look for used or rent
  • Living Religions, 9th Edition, 2014, Mary Pat Fisher
    • Expensive (over $50) look for used or rent

  SAMPLE QUESTIONS

All test questions are in a multiple-choice format, with one correct answer and three incorrect options. The following are samples of the types of questions that may appear on the exam.
1. In Hinduism, the term “karma” implies
a. duty
b. predestination
c. action and reaction
d. good action
2. Vedic religion originated with
a. people who were indigenous to India
Rev 3/2017
b. Aryans who came to India ca. 1500 B.C.E. from Central Asia
c. Persians who came to India ca. 700 B.C.E.
d. Greeks who came to India ca. 300 B.C.E. with Alexander the Great
3. Theravada Buddhism upholds liberation through
a. devotion to Brahman
a. one’s own moral efforts and spiritual discipline
b. divine intercession
c. worship of Buddha
4. Which of the following is NOT one of the Pillars of Islam?
a. Muslims are expected to go on a pilgrimage to Mecca at least once in their lives, if
financially and physically capable.
b. Muslims have to seek the intercession of Muhammad to achieve paradise.
c. Muslims are expected to fulfill their charitable duties.
d. Muslims have to engage in prayer every day.
5. In the Four Noble Truths, the Buddha proclaims that the cause of suffering is
a. lack of proper teachers
b. aggression and violence
c. craving
d. original sin
6. In the Tao Te Ching, Lao Tzu indicates that the best way of living is a life of
a. passivity
b. assertiveness
c. natural simplicity
d. social commitment
7. The New Testament Gospels are primarily
a. complete biographies of Jesus of Nazareth
b. summaries of Christian ethics
c. proclamations of Jesus as Risen Lord and Messiah
d. eyewitness accounts of four apostles
8. The Covenant of Judaism refers to
a. ancient agreements between Israel and neighboring peoples
b. a pact initiated by Yahweh with a particular people
c. a contract among Jewish religious leaders
d. an agreement negotiated to be the Hebrew people and the Egyptians
9. A religious observance commemorating the Exodus is
a. Mishnah
b. Passover
c. Yom Kippur
d. Rosh Hashonah
10. Which of the following Chinese figures transmitted Confucian teachings?
I. Meng-tzu (Mengzi)
II. Hsun-tzu (Xunzi)
III. Mo-tzu (Mozi)
IV. Chu Hsi (Zhu Xi)
a. I and II only
b. III and IV only
c. I, II and III only
d. I, II and IV only
Answers to sample questions:
1-C, 2-C, 3-B, 4-B, 5-C, 6-C, 7-C, 8-B, 9-B, 10-D

Posted in College Majors

College Majors

You won’t find a test, a report, or a data table that will help your teen choose the “perfect” college major.  And by perfect, of course, we mean one that your teen is ridiculously passionate about, undoubtedly fulfilling/challenging, and pays a really great stable salary for 30+ years.  There is no such thing!  That’s a unicorn, and you’ll never find it.

But, there are tests, reports, and data tables that can give us tools to help guide our teen into one path or another when they would consider all things being equal.  In other words, if my teen were ridiculously passionate about photography, and found it undoubtedly fulfilling and challenging, we’d still fall off when we assessed salary and career stability.  Of course, if we only chased salary, we’d all be petroleum engineers.  (at which time to market would become flooded and the demand would sink like a rock- taking salary and career stability with it…so….)

Still, I like to look at information.  I think being informed helps us guide our teens.  I like looking at The Department of Labor Occupational Outlook Handbook first.  I have shared that link before, and if it’s not in your “favorites” it should be!

I like looking at job trends (Occupational Outlook Handbook also reports on those), I like to look at my teen’s natural talent alongside their level of grit.  Let’s be honest, it’s not equally easy to push through some majors, and when you’re fighting the 50% college drop out rate, you don’t need to make things harder than they already are.

Zippia wrote a great article earlier this year talking about college majors, but the part I want to share is the list they pulled from US Census Data about unemployment rates.  Unemployment rates are very important for new grads because a grad has only 6 months before their student loan repayment kicks in.  A delay in employment, or underemployment, can cause your teen to consider deferring or defaulting on their loan payment- and that would be a huge mistake.  As you may have heard, new student loan laws make it next to impossible to discharge student loan debt in bankruptcy, so those who defer or default, are the “horror stories” you hear about that profile students who borrow $50,000 but owe $200,000 after 10 years.  That kind of craziness happens from unemployment or underemployment in the first few years out of school.  So, immediate employment is very important to managing student loan debt. (in terms of the math).

College Majors with the Highest Unemployment Rates

  1. Composition And Rhetoric
  2. Environmental Science
  3. Anthropology And Archaeology
  4. Drama And Theater Arts
  5. Film Video And Photographic Arts
  6. Mass Media
  7. Fine Arts
  8. Area Ethnic And Civilization Studies
  9. Intercultural And International Studies
  10. Communication Technologies

 

If you’re sitting there thinking “that’s the list of majors my teen is considering” don’t despair.   There are a lot of ways to do what you love without making it your major.  As an example, when you visit the DOL Occupational Outlook Handbook, you’ll find a “similar occupations” tab next to each career.  This can be a great way to find similar careers or careers that use the same kind of skills.

Least employable major:  Composition and Rhetoric

Instead of fighting against a 20% unemployment rate in that major, there are ways to keep your curriculum full of writing but also add in job skills that will go farther in the job market.

Alternative majors for Composition and Rhetoric

*these links take you to the DOL details page- tons of good info!!!

Technical Writing (demand growth rate:  faster than average)  Technical writers, also called technical communicators, prepare instruction manuals, how-to guides, journal articles, and other supporting documents to communicate complex and technical information more easily. They also develop, gather, and disseminate technical information through an organization’s communications channels. $70,000 per year.

Public Relations Manager/ Business Communications (demand growth rate: average) Public relations managers plan and direct the creation of material that will maintain or enhance the public image of their employer or client. Fundraising managers coordinate campaigns that bring in donations for their organization.  $100,000+ per year.

College English Teacher or Professor (demand growth rate:  faster than average) Postsecondary teachers instruct students in a wide variety of academic and career and technical subjects beyond the high school level. They also conduct research and publish scholarly papers and books.  A Master’s Degree would be required.  $75,000 per year.


 

As you go down this list, you can do what I did.  Check out the occupations at the DOL website, and look for alternative career opportunities that are in the same lane, but just slightly directed toward a goal with a little bit better trajectory.  If you can’t find anything that might be a good alternative, remember that some interests and passions can take their place in your teen’s heart as a hobby instead of a career.  Photography, especially those who enjoy taking portraits,  might be a great side business or weekend hobby, and it could be part of one’s “day job” without being the sole focus of a career.   Jobs that use photography, like crime scene investigator, requires a major in Forensic Science (growth rate: much better than average) but in a different way.  If that’s difficult to stomach, scientific photographers take pictures of microscopic slides and are among the highest paid of the group.

If I can share a short personal story- my brother’s passion in high school was music performance.  He spent every summer marching drum corps and every school year in orchestra and band.  When it came time for college, instead of choosing performance, he chose Music Education.  While it hasn’t been easy to constantly lobby to keep music education programs from budget cuts, he and my sister in law enjoy a comfortable life with summers off.  On occasion, he’ll play drums for a friend’s weekend gig, and he’s taught summer camps since his schedule allows.  This is an example of making a career that allows you to still have a passion but also secures a future.


My other posts you might like:

College Graduation Rates (part 1 of 2)

College Graduation Rates (part 2 of 2)

 

 

 

Posted in Foreign Language

Foreign Language on Udemy

I’ve written about Foreign Language before, mainly because it can yield HUGE amounts of college credit.  In short, there are about 50 languages that allow you to earn college credit, so if your family speaks any language besides English, you should let them scoop up this credit!  For the rest, it’s not too late to learn a language.  Today’s post will feature a non-traditional curriculum option:  Udemy.

Udemy is an online learning platform marketplace.  You’ll find courses on everything under the sun, but I’ve selected several that will help your teen prepare for the 3 CLEP languages:  French, Spanish, and German.  <—-These links take you to official exam content.

The trick with any foreign language curriculum is to find options that extend beyond the beginner’s level.  You’ll find a lot of interesting options through Udemy.  (Note, Udemy runs sales often, sometimes you’ll see a very expensive course for $150 today, and then tomorrow it will be on sale for $10, so if you see something you like, save the link and check back from time to time).


French

Conversational French Made Easy

Improve Your French with Stories

Master French Grammar like a Pro

Intermediate French


German

Conversational German

Essential German: 1000 Words and Phrases

76-Lesson Course

Write German Like a Native


Spanish

Freshman Year Spanish: 1st Semester

Freshman Year Spanish: 2nd Semester

Advanced Spanish

Spanish 1, 2, 3, and 4 in One Course

Posted in Breaking News, Straighterline

4 Straighterline Courses set to expire

Every credit source (CLEP, AP, DSST, Straighterline, Study, Sophia, etc.) all receive approval for their class/exam that is valid for a specific time range (about 3 years).  When the end of that time range gets close, the company will either have to apply for renewal or the course/exam will “expire.”  You may remember the drama of ALEKS math expiring and extending multiple times over the past year.

It is expected that Straighterline will renew these 4 courses, but just be aware that they are 45 days away from their expiration – that means if your teen is in progress, they’ll want to finish up now!   If these renew (as expected) just go on with your course progress like normal.  If they do NOT renew, I’ll post an update as soon as I have one.

Introduction to Criminal Justice (CJ101)

Select the date range in which the course/exam was completed:
10/1/2014 – 11/30/2017
9/1/2011 – 9/30/2014

Credit Type: Course
ACE Course Number: 0004
Organization: StraighterLine
Length: 14 weeks (75 hours)
Dates Offered: 10/1/2014 – 11/30/201

 

Personal Finance (FIN101)

Select the date range in which the course/exam was completed:
10/1/2014 – 11/30/2017
9/1/2011 – 9/30/2014

Credit Type: Course
ACE Course Number: 0036
Organization: StraighterLine
Length: 14 weeks (75 hours)
Dates Offered: 10/1/2014 – 11/30/2017

 

Pharmacology I (PHARM101)

Select the date range in which the course/exam was completed:
10/1/2014 – 11/30/2017
9/1/2011 – 9/30/2014

Credit Type: Course
ACE Course Number: 0021
Organization: StraighterLine
Length: 14 weeks (75 hours)
Dates Offered: 10/1/2014 – 11/30/2017

 

Pharmacology II (PHARM102)
Credit Type: Course
ACE Course Number: 0100
Organization: StraighterLine
Location: StraighterLine
Length: Self-paced, 14 weeks (75 hours)
Dates Offered: 10/1/2014 – 11/30/2017
Posted in Scholarships, Tuition

Get a Grip on Scholarships

Scholarships sound wonderful, and in some cases they are.  Several good friends have used scholarships to fund the entire education of their teens.  Others were enticed into deep debt chasing small awards at very expensive schools.

A scholarship is a financial award that doesn’t have to be repaid.  Your teen may receive one for academic merit or test scores because they live in a certain geographic area, because they excel in a sport, possess a talent,  are pursuing a certain major, or because the college they are attending has a fund to either entice or subsidize a student’s enrollment.  

Because there feels like a lot of ways a person “could” earn a scholarship, and we’ve all heard that there are “millions of dollars that go unclaimed every year” we want to be sure our teens don’t leave any money on the table.  And if you register your email address and pay the low price of $99, I’ll tell you all about it….. (NO!)

While it is true that some scholarship opportunities go unclaimed each year, far more common are the scholarships that have thousands of applicants for just one shot at $1,000.

Where does the myth of unclaimed scholarships come from?

According to Marvin Carmichael, past Chairman of the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (NASFAA), this notion that billions of dollars of scholarships go unclaimed year has been around for a long time, but it is most definitely a myth. If a university does not award all its scholarship money one year, Carmichael explains, it is because of weird timing issues or highly restrictive eligibility requirements.


CAUTION #1  The Marketing Funnel

The overwhelming majority of scholarship sites are dot-com businesses that exist for the purpose of selling you recycled information already on the web.  These are not scholarship experts, these are internet marketers.  In fact, some of these businesses own dozens of websites with similar names, and they link you back and forth between each other.  The purpose is to capture your email address and give you breadcrumbs of information.  Either through a chain of scheduled emails or links, you’ll be given more free help.  At some point, you’ll be offered a free downloadable ebook. (more breadcrumbs) and possibly sent links to products for you to buy (more ebooks) or a subscription to premium content.  In marketing, this is called a “paywall.”  A paywall is where they want to take you.  Once at the wall, you’ll pay a fee, and gain access to their ultra-premium content.  This can be live webinars, video classes, emails, books, etc.  Congratulations, you’ve fallen for the oldest trick in the book – repackaged for the tech times we live in.  You’ve fallen into a marketing funnel, and the one and only purpose of you being there is to buy something (more than once).

Marketers know that by getting you in the marketing funnel, they have a 1-3% chance of “converting” you to a paying customer.  So, thousands of dollars are spent enticing you to click on something that gets you into the funnel.  Ever see Facebook ads in your newsfeed?  Those are to get you in a marketing funnel.

As you can imagine, it’s a lot of work orchestrating a marketing funnel.  (It’s 100% legal) So, that doesn’t leave much time to generate quality content.  That’s ok, these businessmen can access a huge database of open-copyright content that is available to them to reprint without permission as often as they want.  Oh, did I mention that the likelihood of your teen actually getting a scholarship through one of these sources is 0%?

SOLUTION: Do not google “How to find Scholarships.”  There are better ways, and we’ll discuss them below.


CAUTION #2 The Sports Scholarship

Unlike the marketing funnel, sports scholarships aren’t scams.  They are, however, an excellent way to end up in a world of hurt and deep debt.

All NCAA Division Sports Scholarship information is transparent and open to the public (you) to look at.  So, hoping for a scholarship is less helpful than learning about how they work and how much money they (don’t) award.   Fewer than 2% of public high school students receive sports scholarships, so when you filter down to homeschooled students, there is even less information to go on.  Admittedly, we are a much smaller pool of applicants!  Still, some students (like my 2016 high school graduate son) may be eligible for a sports scholarship.

There are 6 sports in which a “full ride” scholarship exists:  football, men’s and women’s basketball, volleyball, tennis and women’s gymnastics.  If your teen is in one of those sports, I urge you to dive deeper than what we’ll cover here.  I recently watched and recommend a documentary called Schooled.  It reveals some of the challenges and limitations surrounding full scholarships in those sports.   Even if your teen plays one of those sports, if they don’t get picked up by a Division I school, your chances of getting a full ride are almost zero.  The “pot” of billions is distributed like this: Division II schools will get 4.37% of the pot, Division III schools will get 3.18%, and Division I colleges will get the rest.  (That’s 92.45%)

Now, if your sport isn’t on that short list, there IS NO MONEY for a full-ride sports scholarship. I know you think I’m exaggerating, but I’m not.  Sports that are NCAA, but not one of the 6,  are given a pool of money to be split each year – at the coach’s discretion- between all / any of the athletes on the team in that sport.

To use the sport I’m most familiar with, Men’s Swimming and Diving, in 2016, the average team consisted of 20 swim (AND) dive members.  Only the top 9 swim (OR) dive members received part of the money pool.  Those that received any money, averaged $8,000 per year (renewable at the coach’s discretion).  The colleges that participate in college-level swimming and diving, however, average $35,000 per year tuition ($11,000 per year room and board).  In other words, best case scenario would have a student swimming “on scholarship” to receive $32,000 off of their $184,000 degree.  That’s NOT a deal, even for the top swimmer OR diver on the team.

Does this mean your teen shouldn’t pursue athletics?  Not at all!  This means you (the parent) shouldn’t chase athletic scholarships.  Most colleges have athletics, and your teen can play athletics in college without the burden of taking on debt to pursue a “scholarship.”

Please, spend 6 minutes and watch this Divison I athlete’s WATER POLO debt disaster  (stay with it until the end!):


CAUTION #3 Blinded by the (spot)Light

Is there a difference between receiving a stipend, a government grant, an institutional waiver, an endowment payment, an allocation or a scholarship?   I’ll give you a hint, it isn’t the money.

A “scholarship” is a precious word in our culture.  If your teen receives a scholarship, the amount of the award doesn’t much matter- it strokes our ego just the same.  A scholarship validates 18 years of hard work as a homeschool parent, and we get to post about it on Facebook.   Ok, maybe not you.  Maybe it’s just my observation that so many parents are quick to tell me how they (oops, I mean their) teen earned a “scholarship” for this or that, which certainly makes them an expert in the thing they are selling you.light

I don’t want to undercut the victory of a teen that earns a scholarship, but my role is to help you be the best guidance counselor for your teen, and that requires you to ask some hard questions before the celebration.

  1.  Is this scholarship a one-time (non-renewable) award, or does it renew every year?
  2. If this scholarship renews, how many years can you renew it?
  3. What are the requirements to keep it active?  Grade point average? Financial limits? Residency restrictions? Graduate in X number of years?
  4. What is the total cost of my teen’s education AFTER I subtract this scholarship?
  5. Do I have enough money to fund the remaining cost of my teen’s education?
  6. Does this scholarship allow my teen to use it at the college of her choice? Or is it tied to attending a specific college?
  7. Does accepting this scholarship put my family in a position that is difficult financially or in some other way?

Strange questions?  Maybe, but the truth is that scholarships can sometimes create a strain on the family.  If you put each scholarship into the calculator and use math instead of emotion, you’ll be more likely to make a wise choice.


Strategies for Managing Costs

If you’re down to the wire, you’re probably ready for some solutions at this point.  I have a few, and most involve making your own solution to the college-funding problem.  I solve this problem from only one direction – the direction that assumes zero student loan debt.  For those willing to borrow, many of these tips won’t make the cut.  Afterall, your teen can borrow all the money they need, and when they max their cap, you can borrow the rest.  Since 2004, the phrase “improved financial aid programs” is code for “we’re letting everyone borrow what they need.”  Problem solved, right?  With no financial incentive to keep tuition prices low, we’ve observed a staggering increase in the cost of college.  While this is good news for borrowers, it means that those who want to pay cash, or at least remove debt from the equation, have to be exceptionally resourceful.

  1.  If you’re in a state that offers free dual enrollment – USE IT!  Earning even 1 or 2 free classes will help reduce total cost.
  2. If you’re in a state that guarantees community college credits will transfer into your state’s public 4-year colleges – USE IT!  The guaranteed transfer assures that those credits paid for at a community college rate (under $100 per credit)  will count at a college that charges 4-5-6 times that amount!
  3. If you’re in a state that guarantees an Associate of Arts or Associate of Science degree will transfer into your state’s public 4-year college- USE IT!  The value of this maneuver can save the average family at least $35,000 or more.
  4. If you’re in a state that guarantees an AA or AS transfers as a full block of credit, use CLEP, DSST, or AP exams to accelerate the process and save cost.  When locked into a full block transfer, the receiving 4-year college can’t deny credit by exam transfer.
  5. In all 50 states, the cost of attending your state’s private university as an in-state student is lower than attending a neighboring state’s university as an out of state student.
  6. Sometimes, a college offers a special tuition rate for distance learning classes. Check if your teen can save money (or will spend extra money) choosing one over the other.
  7. Shop “degree” instead of “college.”  In most fields, where you went to college (brand name) is less relevant than the degree, major, or content of courses you take.
  8. If your teen has to pay-as-they-go and graduates a year or two later, then so be it!  Coming out of college debt-free will have a greater return on investment than coming out of college with a $35,000 student loan payment.
  9. In high school, point your teen toward working for one of the thousands of companies that offer scholarships to their workers or full tuition reimbursement.
  10. For parents- if you have multiple children lined up for college, consider taking a position with a college or university.  Even janitors and cooks can send their kids to college for free if they work full-time for a university.  While not all universities offer this benefit, most do!    In addition, employees at Tuition Exchange colleges can send their teens to ANY college in the program, not just where they work.

    My other posts/strategies you may be interested in:

  11. BOG AAS Pierpont Community and Technical College  (for those who graduated high school more than 2 years ago)

  12. University of the People  (a free accredited college)
  13. Guaranteed Scholarships (legitimate scholarships for EVERYONE that qualifies)
  14. Sources of Free College Credits (great to use at Thomas Edison State College)
  15. 100 Employer / Employee Scholarships (great companies for your teen!)
  16. Reader Question: Is there a low-cost way to do medical school?  (Yes)
  17. Working During College: Yes or No?  (Yes)
  18. We just saved $96,780  (A member shares how they did it)
  19. Completely FREE Tuition (The follow-up to my book Completely FREE Colleges)
  20. Cost of Tuition in the United States  loan

 

 

Posted in Uncategorized

FREE EVENTS: North Carolina College 101

I’m so thrilled to be asked back again this year to participate in the Charlotte Mecklenburg Library District’s College 101 series.   There are DOZENS of fantastic presentations (in addition to mine!) that make this series worth your time.

ALL of these events are totally free, but registration is required.  (Events are canceled if there aren’t enough signups – so make a reservation asap!)

Monday, October 2, 2017

College 101: Jennifer Cook-DeRosa and Homeschooling for College Credit

6:00pm at Community Room at Mountain Island

An informative program for homeschooling parents and teens. Learn how to make the most of your high school years through resourceful curriculum planning, dual enrollment, and credit by exam.

Saturday, October 14, 2017

College 101: SAT Practice Exam with the Princeton Review

9:30am at Community Room at University City Regional

Kick off your SAT prep with a free redesigned 2016 SAT exam. After the test, the Princeton Review will email you a detailed performance report with personalized tips on how to improve your score.

College 101: SAT Practice Exam with the Princeton Review

9:30am at Cornelius

Kick off your SAT prep with a free redesigned 2016 SAT exam.

College 101: SAT Practice Exam with the Princeton Review

10:00am at Davidson Meeting Room at Davidson

Kick off your SAT prep with a free redesigned 2016 SAT exam.

College 101: SAT Practice Exam with The Princeton Review

10:00am at Community Room at Hickory Grove

Kick off your SAT prep with a free redesigned 2017 SAT exam. After the test, the Princeton Review will email you a detailed performance report with personalized tips on how to improve your score.

College 101: SAT Practice Exam with the Princeton Review

12:30pm at Community Room at Mountain Island

Kick off your SAT prep with a free redesigned 2016 SAT exam. After the test, the Princeton Review will email you a detailed performance report with personalized tips on how to improve your score.

College 101: Free SAT Sample Class with the Princeton Review

Students get the opportunity to experience the first session of Princeton Review’s full SAT Ultimate Course.

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

College 101: The Blueprint: Surviving College

6:00pm at Meeting Room at Scaleybark

Learn from undergraduate, graduate, and professional panelists on how to take advantage of resources available to make the most of your college experience.

Thursday, October 26, 2017

College 101: FAFSA Completion Day

4:00pm at Computer Lab at West Boulevard

Join us for this informal drop-in program where you can get assistance from an expert volunteer and library staff member who can connect you with the resources you need to succeed.

Saturday, October 28, 2017

College 101: SAT Practice Exam with the Princeton Review

9:30am at Community Room A at Beatties Ford Road Regional

Kick off your SAT prep with a free redesigned 2016 SAT exam. After the test, the Princeton Review will email you a detailed performance report with personalized tips on how to improve your score.

Monday, October 30, 2017

College 101: ACT Practice Exam with the Princeton Review

9:15am at Dowd Foundation Learning Studio at Main Library

Prepare for college and kick off your ACT prep with a free practice exam.

College 101: SAT Practice Exam with the Princeton Review

Kick off your SAT prep with a free redesigned 2016 SAT exam. After the test, the Princeton Review will email you a detailed performance report with personalized tips on how to improve your score.

Tuesday, October 31, 2017

College 101: The Blueprint: Surviving College

6:00pm at Children’s Room/MPK Meeting Room at Myers Park

Learn from undergraduate, graduate, and professional panelists on how to take advantage of resources available to make the most of your college experience.

Thursday, November 2, 2017

College 101: Jennifer Cook-DeRosa and Homeschooling for College Credit

6:00pm at Meeting Room at Scaleybark

An informative program for homeschooling parents and teens. Learn how to make the most of your high school years through resourceful curriculum planning, dual enrollment, and credit by exam.

Tuesday, November 7, 2017

College 101: Resources to Help Pay for College

6:00pm at Community Room at Mountain Island

This informative program, led by a College Foundation of North Carolina representative, will introduce you to the FAFSA and how you can find resources to help pay for college.

College 101: The Blueprint: Surviving College

Learn from undergraduate, graduate, and professional panelists on how to take advantage of resources available to make the most of your college experience.

Saturday, November 11, 2017

College 101: ACT Practice Exam with the Princeton Review

10:30am at Community Room at Matthews

Prepare for college and kick off your ACT prep with a free practice exam.

Tuesday, November 14, 2017

College 101: The Blueprint: Surviving College

6:00pm at Community Room B at West Boulevard

Learn from undergraduate, graduate, and professional panelists on how to take advantage of resources available to make the most of your college experience.

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

College 101: Resources to Help Pay for College

6:00pm at IB Community Room at Independence Regional

This informative program, led by a College Foundation of North Carolina representative, will introduce you to the FAFSA and how you can find resources to help pay for college.

Thursday, November 16, 2017

College 101: Planning for College with Central Piedmont Community College

6:00pm at Community Room B at Beatties Ford Road Regional

This program will provide information on the college preparation timeline, differences between high school and college, factors to consider when selecting a college, information about the FAFSA, an

Saturday, November 18, 2017

College 101: ACT Practice Exam with the Princeton Review

9:30am at Cornelius

Prepare for college and kick off your ACT prep with a free practice exam.

College 101: ACT Practice Exam with the Princeton Review

12:30pm at Mountain Island

Prepare for college and kick off your ACT prep with a free practice exam.

College 101: Free ACT Sample Class with Princeton Review

2:00pm at Community Room Full at Sugar Creek

Students get the opportunity to experience the first session of Princeton Review’s full ACT Ultimate Course.

Wednesday, November 29, 2017

College 101: Resources to Help Pay for College

6:00pm at Teen Media Room at Hickory Grove

This informative program, led by a College Foundation of North Carolina representative, will introduce you to the FAFSA and how you can find resources to help pay for college.

Thursday, November 30, 2017

College 101: Resources to help pay for college

6:00pm at Community Room at Plaza Midwood

This informative program, led by a College Foundation of North Carolina representative, will introduce you to the FAFSA and how you can find resources to help pay for college.

Tuesday, December 5, 2017

College 101: Resources to Help Pay for College

6:00pm at Community Room at University City Regional

This informative program, led by a College Foundation of North Carolina representative, will introduce you to the FAFSA and how you can find resources to help pay for college.

Tuesday, December 12, 2017

College 101: Resources to Help Pay for College

12:00pm at Dowd Foundation Learning Studio at Main Library

This informative program, led by a College Foundation of North Carolina representative, will introduce you to the FAFSA and how you can find resources to help pay for college.

Wednesday, December 13, 2017

College 101: Resources to Help Pay for College

This informative program, led by a College Foundation of North Carolina representative, will introduce you to the FAFSA and how you can find resources to help pay for college.